End of month view – November 2016

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I took these photos in Monday’s gorgeous sunshine and it’s now Friday and I’m only just getting round to posting.  Ooops.

There’s not much colour now, but the late blooming Salvias are really earning their keep and there are even a few annuals, such as the Nicotianas still blooming.img_1915

The Grass Bed is being overwhelmed with self seeded Cerinthe and Nasturtium.  The Nasturtiums need to be hauled out and binned, but I’d like to replant some of the Cerinthe elsewhere and hence at the moment I’ve left them where they are.  Funnily enough though, they haven’t stopped growing while I procrastinate, and I’m now in danger of losing the path altogether! img_1916

Near the house, the Flower Carpet roses are still pumping out new buds:img_1923

Whereas the Bronze Bed is now in dire need of sorting, with my lovely ‘Happy Single Date’ dahlias now only sad stalks.img_1924

A little clearing and planting has been done.  I’ve cleared all the dead Hosta foliage,img_1918

in the drive bed I’ve finally planted out some seedlings –  Erysimums and Digitalis and also some new Narcissus ‘Thalia’ bulbs.img_1925

And in the troughs I’ve finally chucked out the old leggy Stocks, Matthiola incana, and replanted with new ones grown from cuttings.  I’ve also planted Narcissus ‘Minnow’ here.img_1913

In the greenhouse, I’ve brought in some succulents img_1920

and tender plantsimg_1922

and also got my ‘Winter Sunshine’ Sweet Peas coming (although sadly not one of the cream ones, weird)img_1921

And the final thing in the greenhouse?  Ah yes, a large box of unplanted bulbs.  Roll on the weekend.img_1929

With thanks to Helen at the Patient Gardener who hosts EoMV.

Babies!

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This time last year, prompted by a Black Friday deal from Chilterns Seeds, I went a bit mad with my seed purchasing:IMG_0089

And whilst I did plant the vast majority, some never got beyond the seed tray where they languished, sad and spindly, until I threw them out recently.  What a waste.

Reflecting on my reducing spare time (and likely move to full time working, with possibly even a fourth day in London every week, gulp) I decided that I really should curb my seed habit and curtail the number I grow in 2017.

And yet….

First of all I read Dan’s wonderful ‘Little Miracle’ account of growing Canarina canariensis from seed in the Frustrated Gardener, then I had a look at the Chiltern ‘preview catalogue’ for 2017 and finally, faced with the soggy mass of Hosta vegetation (above), what couldn’t I ignore?  Oh look:img_1909

My ‘real’ babies are adult now, but just think how many plant ones I can have!

Here we go again…..

In a vase on Monday – bronze cup?

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Having shared one of the lovely Rosa ‘Jubilee Celebration’ blooms in a Wordless Wednesday earlier in the month, I cut three for today’s vase and there were still some left behind.img_1904

These were joined by more of the rose hips from Rosa Wedding Day (which I used in the golf dinner flowers) as well as a couple of tawny Nasturtiums.img_1905

The final component was the Ceratostigma seed headsimg_1906

Not only does this plant have these funky, whiskery seed heads at this time of year, but it also has fabulous pinky bronze leaves (and for those of you who don’t know the plant, stunning bright blue flowers in late summer).img_1902

Why don’t you go over to Rambling in the Garden to see what Cathy and others have found this week?

To bee or not to bee #5

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As you may have gleaned, things have been rather busy recently chez Duver Diary and it was mid November before I suddenly realised I hadn’t returned my Mason Bee tubes. Thankfully it’s been mild here so I thought it was still worth doing.

I pulled out all the tubes and, as instructed, where no ‘cap’ was visible I held them up to the light to see if the tube was blocked (because apparently tubes can be occupied even if not capped) and sure enough there were a number which were blocked.

Happily, whereas in my last post in September I thought I had seven capped and therefore occupied tubes, when I actually investigated them all, there were fourteen!img_1898

As explained last time, some of the tubes appear to have been capped by leaves not mud – see below – and these are occupied by leaf cutter bee coccoons.  Mason Bees UK don’t want these returned, so I’m following their instructions to look after these at home.

I’ve now sent all the mud capped tubes off in a Jiffy bag and am looking forward to receiving another set of Red Mason Bee cocoons in the spring.img_1901

With thanks to Mason Bees UK for making it all so easy.