Tag Archives: stipa tenuissima

End of Month View – February 2019

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What a crazy January/February!  One of the main distractions has been this:IMG_4645

Not only were we daft enough to buy a puppy (I could stop there).  Not only were we daft enough to buy a puppy, but we chose one born near Ilkley in West Yorkshire which required two weekend trips up north – one to choose her and one to pick her up.  Kiri (Labradoodle x Golden Doodle) arrived home on 10th February and has been terrorising both us and 10 year old Nimbus ever since!

A more miserable February happening was both the OH and me getting flu.  I was stuck in Richmond too ill to travel, and he was stuck on the IoW, likewise.  Consequently there was no TLC to be had.  I thought the ‘kids’ might look after me, but as soon as the daughter realised how poorly I was, she decamped to a friends’.  Conversely the son didn’t, but after two days’ worth of the odd pat on the back and a couple of cups of peppermint tea, he too succumbed!  I don’t think I’ve been so wiped out for decades and am still not 100%.  (I made a new year’s resolution to climb the five floors to my office and, up until the flu, I did so without fail at least once a day when I was in London, but I haven’t been able to face it since).  As you can imagine energy for gardening has also been a little thin on the ground.

The final thing that happened was that I was promoted at work (something that’s been lined up for months but for various reasons has been delayed).  The joke is that almost as soon as it was announced I went down with the flu and had more days off sick (four) than I have in the previous decade!

Anyway, back to the garden.  Finally, in the glorious weather a couple of weekends ago I got out and started some clearly/pruning/weeding.  There’s masses still to do but at least I’ve made a start.

The usual twirl takes us firstly past the troughs.  There should be Minnow Narcissi coming here, but I’m more excited that I’ve got away with leaving the Pelargoniums out over the winterIMG_4659

On to the Veg Patch which has been cleared apart from some cutting plants –  three plants of Dianthus barbatus ‘Green Wicky’, a Peony (Coral Charm)and three new roses for cutting.IMG_4653

I treated the Diving Lady to some Pulmonaria ‘Blue Ensign’ for her pool.IMG_4654

The Swing Beds have had a bit of a weed but all the roses still need pruning and I must do some dividing and general rationalisation. IMG_4655

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In the Grass Bed there is plenty of self sown Cerinthe and masses of forget me nots and bulbs coming.  I still haven’t bought any more Stipas, but I have planted up some seedlings in pots, so the plan is to try to replace them along the whole back of the bed.IMG_4657

The Mid Century bed is also a mass of Cerinthe, accompanied by a massive self sown Euphorbia.  (I pulled one out last year, but this one, left behind, is really taking over!)  In the centre you can still see the Erysimum Red Jep flowering.  I’ve taken cuttings of this so will be able to introduce it elsewhere in the garden. IMG_4660

In the Oak Bed, the Hellebores have bulked upIMG_4665

and the Hamamelis ‘Arnold’s Promise’ is finally looking properly established.IMG_4666

The bulbs in the Bronze Bed are nearly all still in bud – but the ones picked for my Monday vase were very quick to bloom once brought into a warm kitchen.

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More Hellebores in the Shady Bed, but the inherited white rose which used to do quite well here, despite the lack of light, has keeled over during the winter and needs digging out.IMG_4650

Next, the greenhouse, where there were some cuttings and seedlings here when I took these photos in late February, but since then I’ve planted hundreds more seeds and everywhere’s starting to fill up.

Which is a little tricky, as I’m sure you can guess who hasn’t spring cleaned it yet….IMG_4652

And to finish, another shot of mademoiselle.  Butter wouldn’t melt….IMG_4658

End of month view – November 2015

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Whilst there are certain areas of the garden looking reasonably tidy, like the left hand Lavender Bed above, the majority of the garden is in a state of chaos, like the right hand one below. Not only is this bed full of self seeded Lychnis coronaria and Verbena bonariensis corpses, but sadly it’s also pretty full of couch grass.  I think a big dig is called for.IMG_9651

The Swing Beds are also looking almost completely devoid of colour, although they are now marginally tidier than the photos below as I did some chopping back at the same time as planting some Dichelostemma ida maia bulbs, bought from the Avon Bulbs sale.  Hope they’re not in too late!

I still havent tackled the climbing roses as I think gauntlets and a ladder will be required.IMG_9656IMG_9659

The grass beds have had the Zinnias and a few lingering Verbascum pulled pulled out, and are now back to the bare bones of the Stipa tenuissima along the back, with a muddle of forget me nots and self seeded Cerinthe major in front (and let’s be honest, in the path).  I’ve added a few more Narcissi in this bed, but it does makes me a bit sad to think I’ll be waiting until April for anything to happen.IMG_9661

The Mid Century Bed is probably the most colourful with the Salvia ‘Dyson’s Scarlet’ and Rhodochiton atrosanguineus still blooming well, albeit rather manically.IMG_9652

One thing I am excited about in this (easterly) end of the garden, are my Agapanthus grown from seed planted at the back of the strawberry bed.  Although they didn’t flower this year (others planted in front of the greenhouse did) they’ve grown enormously and I’m hoping they will like the reflected heat from the wall and bloom next summer.IMG_9654

At the other end of the garden the Bronze Bed has nearly been put to bed.  The ‘Happy Single Date’ Dahlias which provided so many blooms and so much pleasure this year still haven’t died back, but they do seem to have finally given up flowering.  They’ll be nothing else in this bed until the Hamamelis flowers in February.IMG_9671

However, behind the Bronze Bed, the Melianthus major is madly continuing to produce new leaves.IMG_9672

Other sources of hope and optimism are provided by late season cuttings (or perennial seedlings awaiting a permanent home),IMG_9664

bulbsIMG_9667

and early sweet peas in the greenhouse.IMG_9668

as well as perky succulents.

They’ve been moved under the glass verandah, but are probably in need of being properly inside if continued perkiness is to be assured!IMG_9674

With thanks to Helen at the Patient Gardener for hosting everyone’s End of Month Views.

 

End of month view – June 2015

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I’m joining Helen at the Patient Gardener to share my June End of Month view.

As some of you know, I opened my garden on Sunday for the local hospice as part of a group opening, and I have to say when I got back from work on Thursday I was devastated to see how exhausted everything looked.  Despite some watering and tidying there were definitely areas that were past their best, but the show must go on and I actually got lots of lovely comments (and over 150 visitors!)IMG_7889

All the photos, apart from the one above, were taken in Monday’s bright sunshine, and I’ve struggled a bit with the light levels.  The one above however, was taken during the opening, and you can see it was a lot greyer.  Luckily (for the visitors, not for the garden!) we missed all the rain bar a few drops.IMG_7907

The Swing Beds were definitely struggling, and even the roses which had looked so lovely the weekend before, were going off a little.  There are Dahlias and Cosmos and Dianthus carthusianorum (grown from seed) amongst other things still to come here, so I hope I can keep it going.

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The Grass Bed has a very limited palette of plants, just the grasses (Stipa tenuissima), looking lovely at this time of year, the self seeded Cerinthe, Allium ‘Hair’ (which has been very badly ‘rusted’ this year), the Verbascum chaixxi Album I grew from seed and the Catananche caerulea, which are new and I just love.  However, around all this is much bare soil, following the disposal of all the dead forget me nots, but I’m not sure what else to add.  I still have various seedlings kicking around, so perhaps I’ll pop some of them in.  IMG_7903

Above is the new Mid Century Bed which is really starting to fill out.  The Ranunculus are still going strong and have now been joined by the first of my new roses to flower, Rosa Munstead Wood, just gorgeous.  I’ve also planted some annuals here including Centaurea cyanus Black Boy, Daucus carota Black Knight, Molucella and Malope.  The Centaurea are just starting to flower, but hopefully the rest will have appeared by next month’s EOMV.

In the other new bed, the Bronze Bed, some combinations have worked, including this one of Calendula Sunset Buff, Achillea Terracotta and Nasturtium Caribbean Crush.IMG_7892

But in common with the Swing Beds, the overall look is a bit exhausted.  However, this picture does show clearly why I wanted the new bed as you can see just how shaded the Oak bed is, in comparison, across the lawn.IMG_7893

In the veg beds, the beans and peas are all rushing up their poles, we’re having the best Raspberry crop ever IMG_7913

and the Diving Lady has again got somewhere to swim

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The raised cutting beds are still looking rather empty apart from plants that overwintered.IMG_7917

But the barrow, which has been a bit of a mess for quite a while, had a good tidy up in honour of the opening, and is looking rather pretty again.IMG_7915

The barrow sits to the right of the greenhouse and this year I’ve added some more orangey plants here too.  Firstly the Antirrhinum Orange Wonder, which I’d originally grown for the Bronze Bed but decided there was more room here

IMG_7919and also the Lathyrus Belinensis, grown in pots either side of the greenhouse door.  These have been really slow to get going but are now starting to look more settled.  They don’t grow as tall as ‘normal’ sweet peas, and nor do they have the same fragrance, but I love their bicoloured flowers and how they work with both the brick and the pot.  I just need them to fill out!

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And to finish, the one bed looking untouched by the recent heat – the Shady Bed looking cool and calm.  IMG_7920

With thanks to Helen for hosting this meme.

Garden Bloggers’ Foliage Day – January 2015

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Anyone who’s read this blog for any length of time will know how much I love my Melianthus Major (above).  And seeing it in the sunlight today prompted me to join Christine at My Hesperides Garden with her Garden Bloggers’ Foliage Day, even though I’m a day late!

I’ve used my Macro lens, so these photos are close ups, deliberately concentrating on individual leaves, rather than the whole plant.

It’s been interesting to look at foliage rather than flowers today (and just as well at this time of year!) and I’ve been interested to see how much blue/silver toned foliage I have,  including this tiny Pachyveria succulent,IMG_5825

Phlomis italicaIMG_5844

CinerariaIMG_5826

young Digitalis foliage, IMG_5846

Euphorbia mysinitesIMG_5871

Lavender IMG_5853

and Olive.  IMG_5841

The only red at this time of year is the Cornus and the inherited Phormium below.  I’m not really a fan of phormium and I’ve inherited four.  One I think I should really have out, but the rest provide good structure, so I’ll probably leave them alone this year.IMG_5832

My lovely Stipa tenuissima grasses are looking quite dead, but they will return!   Meanwhile they’re still providing lovely movement along the back of the grass bed.  I’ve combed them through but don’t usually cut them back.  They should start regrowing fairly soon.IMG_5849

One plant I don’t think I’ve ever featured before is another inheritance, a bottlebrush, Callistemon citrinus.  This has got quite large now but I’ve read you can’t prune too severely as it won’t regenerate from low down (a bit like lavender) so I think I should give it just a light trim this year, immediately after flowering, to try to keep it in check.IMG_5864

And to finish, I guess these catkins are strictly flowers, but somehow they sit better here than on GBBD!  These are the lovely catkins of Garrya Eliptica, also known as the Silk Tassel Bush.

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With thanks again to Christina for hosting this lovely meme.

End of month view – yearly round up, 2014

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I’m following Helen at the Patient Gardener (a day late) with a rather indulgent ‘yearly round up’ in lieu of a normal ‘month end view’.

Some of these photos have been shown recently in my Plotting and Planning post (where I also included a garden plan), but whereas in that post there was often only one view of a given area, in this post, like in Helen’s, I’ve tried to include multiple views through the year.  Click on the thumbnails if you want to see larger pictures.

Firstly, the left hand swing bed.  There were a few daffodils early on (which don’t show up very well in the March shot) and these were followed by tulips in April.  Whilst I liked the bold red I found it clashed with pink tree blossom flowering at the same time, and so this year I’ve changed the colouring of the tulips for a (hopefully!) more harmonious spring.  Later in the year the Sisyrinchium were a dominant plant, but I felt too dominant and they have now been moved to the drive bed.  Later still there’s a good display from salvias and asters, but the flowers that kept going for the longest were definitely the Verbena bonariensis and the Penstemons – real stalwarts!

In the grass bed, the Stipa tenuissima is the constant, with bulbs, forget me nots and wallflowers early on, followed by alliums, fox and cubs and Verbascum chaixii album (grown from seed). These were followed later still by Nasturtium black velvet and Salvia viridis blue.  I’ve now thinned out a lot of the fox and cubs as I felt they weren’t really providing enough interest and think I’ll replace them with some annual planting for this summer.

Most of you will already have heard me bemoaning the oak bed.  It’s lovely early on, with daffodils and hellebores, but as the over-the-road-oak leafs up, the bed becomes very shaded and is a rather uninspiring group of shrubs (apart from my favourite Cercis canadensis Forest Pansy seen in purple at the bottom left in the July photo and glowing orange in October) .  My solution (for the time being) is to accept this and instead create a new bed, closer to the house, which will be out of the oak’s shadow and therefore much easier to succeed with.  Watch this space!

The shady bed, although equally shady, manages to be much more pleasing.  It doesn’t change much at all through the year but I like the  structure of the log and the foliage shapes.  (You may think I should be able to apply lessons from this bed to the oak bed, but we need height in the oak bed which the shrubs achieve in a way that, sadly, the shady bed planting wouldn’t, well certainly not instantly)

I’ve added some new bulbs to this bed for spring, and would also like to increase the range of ferns, but otherwise I think this bed will remain largely unchanged this year.

The hosta bed, which was created new in 2013, was doing fine right up until we had the house painted and there was a degree of ladder, scaffolding, and paint damage.  Ah well, makes a change from the slugs 😉

Near the hosta bed are the new raised cutting beds.  Although less shallow than ideal, they were very productive last year and I intend to repeat the idea again, but with some new annuals to play with.

The large galvanised troughs have effectively created a new, thin, bed in front of the decking. These were planted with two different Narcissus, Segovia then Minnow, as well as Allium Purple Sensation and Matthiola Incana.  And in the summer I added Cosmos Purity.

For next year I’ve topped up the Purple Sensation but am fervently hoping the narcissi will return!

My little veg patch is made up of three terraces, the lowest planted with strawberries and rhubarb, and the top one currently has some rather weedy chard.  The main bed shown here, is where I grow the bulk of my veg, this year peas, mange touts, sugar snaps, french beans, runner beans, pumpkin munchkin and courgettes, with a few soft fruits (raspberries, blackberries and tayberries) towards the back.

Other veg, along with hundreds (thousands?) of seeds and cuttings are grown in my greenhouse.

So that’s my round up, quite a lot of positives, but as always, many things to improve on.

2015 will provide a further challenge as I’ve been invited to open the garden (for the third time) for the local biennial ‘Secret Gardens’ event, where a dozen or so gardens open on the day of the village fete in June, in aid of the local hospice.

Furthermore, my daughter turns 18 in late July and is talking about having a party in the garden before school breaks up.  However, I don’t suppose a group of tipsy teenagers will prove to be quite such discerning garden visitors as the June lot!

Here’s wishing you all a happy and floriferous 2015.

 

Plotting and planning

 

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Prompted by Cathy, at Rambling in the Garden (and Helen, at the Patient Gardener), I too have spent a happy hour with the felt tips, creating a plan of my plot.

My starting point was a Google Earth photo which I traced and updated with the changes we’ve made since moving in just over five years ago.  What’s surprised me is just how busy the plot is with structures – some inherited, like the office and decking, but others new like the garage, the chicken shed (currently empty of chickens) the greenhouse, and the pergola with swing.  I’m surprised I’ve got any space for plants!

Unlike Cathy and Helen, I haven’t marked many plants at all, but instead thought I’d go round the garden from top right, sharing some favourite photos of each of the beds from the past year.

So, to start with, the veg bedsIMG_3852

the swing beds,

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Grass bed (spring, summer and autumn),2013 05 009IMG_2727

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the left hand lavender bed,IMG_2738

the oak bed (spring and summer).  IMG_1302

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the melianthus major,IMG_2645

wisteria,IMG_3643

herb bed,IMG_2060 (2)

hosta bed,IMG_4622

raised cutting beds,IMG_4617

shady bed,IMG_4619

the greenhouseGreenhouse (2)

right hand med bed,IMG_3667

and the troughs.IMG_1406 (2)

So, if you’re still with me, what about the two areas shaded with red dots, described in the key as ‘Decisions’?  Well these are areas where I’m considering removing lawn to create new beds. The first, marked with hose below, looking towards the chicken shed, I was envisaging as a rose and peony bed.  I can’t see this bed from the house (due to the changes in height which I haven’t really conveyed on the plan), but it would be very obvious when looking west from the swing.  And swinging would seem more like a rose time activity than spring or autumn.

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The second potential bed, would be on the northern edge side of the smaller lawn.  As you can see from the oak bed photos above, the bed is good in the spring, but in the summer is less interesting, once the canopy of the over-the-road-oak is established.

The advantage of the envisaged new bed is that the oak’s shadow wouldn’t reach it and so I would have a new, sunny, south facing patch to play with.  If we eat outside, we sit under the verandah (see wisteria photo), and the new bed would be in full view of the table and allow for much more interesting summer planting than I currently achieve in the shady beds.IMG_3646

The planting I imagine here is coppery toned (as a break from all the pink in the rest of the garden), with plants like Bupleurum ‘Bronze Beauty,’ Calendula ‘Sunset buff’, Scabiosa atropurpurea `Fata Morgana’, ‘Hordeum jubatum’ and maybe a rose or two – ‘Lady Emma Hamilton’ or ‘Summer Song’.

So any thoughts?  I don’t think funds will extend to both as the lawns are on very heavy clay and we’ll have to dig well down and replace with better quality soil to have any hope of success.

My preference is for the coppery bed.  The lawn here is poor anyway (in many ways I’d like the whole lawn up, but that’s another story) and it would be lovely when eating outside to have some blooms to admire, and maybe some scent too, but what do you think?

Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day – November 2014

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So it’s November, and whilst the garden isn’t exactly overwhelmed with blooms, there are still many flowers – and some quite exotic.  Firstly this orange abutilon, Abutilon ‘Orange Marion’. This is still sitting on my barrow and has been flowering non stop since June.  It’s in a large pot so will be brought into the greenhouse once frost is threatened, but in the meantime it’s enjoying the sunshine.

There are still roses flowering – Snow Goose,IMG_5385

and two inherited, nameless varieties:IMG_5352

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Another good genus still going strong is Salvia, Salvia microphylla ‘Cerro Potosí’IMG_5376

unknown and IMG_5372

Salvia ‘viridis blue’, flowering in front of the Stipa tenuissima in the grass bed.IMG_5381

Climbers include Honeysuckle and IMG_5387

Clematis ‘Freckles’.IMG_5380

In the ‘med’ beds, this Potentilla nepalensis ‘Shogran’ is still flowering well.  I just love this particular shade of pink.IMG_5392

On the more exotic side, flowers which you think should perhaps know better than to be flowering in November, there is a Grevillea (is it just me or do the buds remind you of a rather pretty  fist?)IMG_5370

Marguerites, still looking cheerful despite the chill, IMG_5369

Nerine bowdenii,

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Zinnia ‘Giant Dahlia Mixed’, in the cutting troughsIMG_5362

and the lovely diascia I was given by Nick Peirce from White Cottage Daylilies, which I wrote about here.  I really must ask Nick what it’s called.IMG_5378

And still the Verbena bonariensis come!IMG_5388

With thanks as ever to Carol at May Dream Gardens for hosting GBBD.

End of month view – June 2014

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Well, what a balmy June.  However, partly as a consequence of this balminess, I feel like the garden has got away from me this month.  There has been too much indulging in garden visiting (there have been others, watch this space…) and just not enough proper graft.  One thing I have spent a significant amount of time doing is watering – especially all my pots.

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Whilst others around the country have had some significant downpours, we’ve had nothing but the odd shower and as a consequence I’m developing arms like Popeye from carrying endless watering cans around.  Whilst we’re lucky enough to have a well (and associated complicated pump and holding tanks) the water pressure isn’t high enough to use a hose, hence the endless cans – and impressive muscles!

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So, having made my excuses, here we go.  The first picture is the grass bed.  I still love the Stipa tenuissima, but the rest of the bed is looking rather a mess.  The hope was that the dark nasturtium (Nasturtium Black Velvet) would pick up on the dark orange of the buds of the fox and cubs, but the latter seem to be going over, and rather than orange I have numerous tiny dandelion type seed heads, which don’t go with anything.

On a more positive note, behind the fox and cubs, but in front of the grasses, I’ve planted a whole row of the Verbascum chaixii album which I grew from seed last year.  These are just starting to flower so hopefully by next month I will have pulled out the spent fox and cubs and have some towering verbascums to admire.

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This is the left hand swing bed, which is looking a bit exhausted.  I haven’t pulled up the foxgloves yet in the hope that they’ll self seed, but the combination of them, the brown Nectoscordum heads and my very poorly Euphorbia wulfenii is not good.  However, hopefully some concerted effort in pulling all the above out, cutting back the geraniums (out of shot at the front of the picture), and giving some space, food, time and water to various annuals I’ve planted out recently (Cosmos Rubenza, Malope, Cleomes) as well as the existing Astrantia, Roses and Penstemons, will pull things back from the brink.

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The ‘Med Beds’ (ie Mediterranean) either side of the greenhouse door are looking rather better.  The Geranium and Potentilla are flowering well, the Eryngium are preparing themselves and I’ve planted out many of the Agapanthus I grew from seed.  I don’t suppose they’ll flower this year, but fingers crossed for next.  I’m also pleased with the Euphorbia mysinites (at the front), which I also grew from seed and must now be about four years old.

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This is the left hand Lavender Bed, the ones described as ‘bonkers’ in last month’s End of month view.   (Both lavender beds are shown in the foreground of the top photo).

Here you can see the old Allium Purple Sensation dead heads in amongst the lavender.  The colour of the lavender is picked up by the Veronicastrum behind, with a yellow flowering Euphorbia for contrast (and the ubiquitous Verbena bonariensis)

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The shady bed is continuing to look lush, despite the hot weather, and the inherited rose is flowering well

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and the hostas were also looking great, right up until the scaffolders came and planted their scaffold and ladder on them.

IMG_3666A new addition this month is my raised cutting beds which were made out of some repurposed greenhouse staging.  I’m a bit concerned as to how shallow they are, but whenever I pull up annuals at the end of the season the roots never go very deep so I hope with food and water they’ll do ok.  I’ve already cut some Amaranthus viridis, Molucella laevis as well as the Marigold, Calendula Sunset Buff, but the vast majority are still to come.

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Meanwhile, in the veg bed, the Diving Lady’s pool runneth over (and is being invaded by courgette leaves), but at least she now has plenty to look at:

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As well as three different sort of courgettes (yes, I know, too many altogether), I’ve planted French Beans (Cobra), Runner Beans (Painted Lady and Polestar), Chard Bright Lights, Cavalo Nero, Mange Tout, Sugar Snap peas and Pumpkin Munchkin.

IMG_3671I’ve finally planted out the greenhouse bed with tomatoes, cucumbers and, for the first time, Cucamelons.

IMG_3670And on the staging, second waves of beans and peas (which need to go out), various seedlings (the ones in the foreground are Abutilons) and cuttings, as well as in the grow bags some (rather diminutive) peppers and aubergines.

IMG_3643The wisteria is kindly providing a second flush, and the Oak Bed, which I always find disappointing, is actually looking rather calm in the heat of June.

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And to finish, the most exciting development.  After some weeks’ persuasion, the OH has finally agreed that we can lose some lawn to make another bed (see hose line below) as long as ‘he doesn’t have to dig it’.  Wish me luck!

With many thanks, as ever, to Helen at the Patient Gardener,  for hosting everyone’s End of Month views.

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Jumping horses

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This is the ‘Grass bed,’ so called because of the row of Stipa tenuissima running along the back.
As you can see, at the moment it’s full of forget-me-knots, Erysimum ‘Ivory Giant’ and tulips either in flower, or still to come.  Last year’s Narcissi ‘Sinopel‘ seem to have gone blind this year which is a shame, but bearing in mind the bed faces north, they did all insist on looking the other way, rather than towards the garden, which struck me as rather rude, particularly bearing in mind how expensive they were.
What you can’t see, is that later in the summer this bed is plagued with mare’s tail (Equisetum arvense), and I spend quite a lot of time trying to keep on top of it with varying levels of determination depending on what else is going on.
Having had a problem with it years ago on my London allotment, I’m aware that the roots go deep, but a little investigation has suggested they go down 2 metres.  What I can’t quite fathom, even bearing this in mind, is whether there is a relationship between the mare’s tail in the grass bed, and that growing more like 3 metres below at the road side:
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However new information has recently come to light in the form of the quarterly “Kew” magazine.  Apparently the physicist, Philippe Marmottant of Joseph Fourier University in Grenoble, has filmed the movement of mare’s tail spores with a high-speed camera and discovered that the way they move is humidity dependent.  
At high humidity the spores appear spherical, but as the air dries they change shape – at 75% humidity four ribbon like ‘arms’ unfurl, reaching their full extent when humidity drops to 50%.  Because this movement is related to the different structure of the inner and outer layers of the ‘arms’, the process can be repeated again and again, resulting in the spores ‘walking’ – albeit very slooooowly.  Conversely, when fully hydrated spores are exposed to sudden drying, they ‘leap’ from the ground, reaching a height as much as a…….centimetre. Now a centimetre may not sound much, but it takes the spores out of the still air at ground level and into moving air that can transport them into new areas to colonise.
So the question is, did my mare’s tail come from creeping rhizomes that haven’t read the RHS’s 2 metres fact, or from ‘jumping’ spores, caught in an updraft of a passing car and deposited on my bed?  I’m really not sure, I just wish it was neither.