Tag Archives: Sea Thrift

Duver dreaming

IMG_4120

Talk about ships that pass in the night – I returned from New York, only for the OH to turn around and head to Toronto!

Today finally saw us breakfasting and dog walking together for the first time in a fortnight – and to celebrate here he is, possibly showing his best side ūüėČ

As many of you know, this blog is named after the National Trust area of land opposite our house called St Helens Duver (pronounced ‘duvver’).¬† It’s the location for our daily walk with Nimbus, our labradoodle.IMG_4103

Slightly earlier in the year the duver is smothered in sea thrift Armeria maritima.¬†¬†(First blogged about here four years ago).¬†¬†It’s a little past its best now, but you get the idea.IMG_4100

Today, however, it felt like all the other wild flowers had joined the thrift, and appeared together – foxglovesIMG_4107

evening primrose, Oenothera biennis,IMG_4108

dog rosesIMG_4115

and sea holly Eryngium maritimum.IMG_4111

Allwere looking magnificent in today’s glorious sunshine.¬† What a perfect day!

Wildflower Wednesday – late May 2015

IMG_7576

I’m a day late joining the Wildflower Wednesday meme, but excited to report that it’s Sea Thrift (Armeria maritima) time again on the Duver.

As last year, I’m struggling to convey the scale and beauty of these wonderful blooms.IMG_7537

In this photo, the thrift is joined in the foreground¬†by¬†Silverweed (Potentilla anserina). ¬†This has a pretty¬†silvery leaf (clue’s in the name!) and spreads by runners. ¬†It seems to be increasing its hold on the Duver, with significant areas now covered in an argent carpet.IMG_7548

Also joining the Thrift are the first spires of Digitalis, projecting through the marram grass.IMG_7553

IMG_7560

Further out on the sandy spit, the first of the Evening Primrose, Oenothera biennis are also blooming.IMG_7567

The¬†small patch of¬†Bladder Campion (Silene vulgaris) is just coming into¬†bloom. ¬†As I mentioned last year, according to Sarah Raven it‚Äôs ‚Äėedible and said to taste like peas ‚Äď the young shoots are good in a spring salad or as quickly wilted greens‚Äô but I’ll continue to leave the wild campions alone and instead pick my peas at home!IMG_7204

And to finish, two photos of the field opposite the house.

The first was taken a couple of weeks ago, and I don’t remember ever seeing the¬†cow parsley, Anthriscus sylvestris so tall, or the Alexanders, Smyrnium olusatrum¬†providing quite such a lime green sea.IMG_7175

Yesterday, the scene was rather different as the fluffy white clouds have been strimmed away. Bizarrely it reminds me of a newly shorn dog, all exposed and uncomfortable.  Doubtless it will all grow back and soften up once more.IMG_7529

With thanks as ever to Gail at Clay and Limestone for hosting the Wildflower Wednesday meme.

Return to the Duver – late May 2014

IMG_2474

Since my last Duver post there have been great floral developments on the Duver.

Firstly, the foxgloves (Digitalis purpurea), which I worried might have been depleted by some over enthusiastic council clearing, seem to be back in full strength.  The seeds can germinate decades after dispersal (much like poppies), so if this year had been disappointing, I suppose all would not have been lost.

I love the density of flowers – my foxgloves, grown from seed, cossetted at every step of the way and protected from council ‘enthusiasm,’ are nothing like as impressive. ¬†Nature eh?

IMG_2454

IMG_2452Also, behind the foxgloves in the first picture is a magnificent Tree Lupin (Lupinus Arboreus). Apparently lupins were brought to the UK by the Romans who used them as food for themselves and their animals, but also ploughed them back into the soil as green manure.

The Isle of Wight is known as a Roman settlement (there is a fabulous Roman Villla not far away at Brading), so amazing to think there may have been lupins here for 2000 years.

There are a number of tree lupins in this area and this one, in a much more shady position, will clearly be flowering later than the one above.

IMG_2455

On a sandy spit which protrudes south into the mouth of the Bembridge Harbour is a magnificent colony of Evening Primrose (Oenothera biennis).   I love the way the colours differ on the same plant, depending on the age of the the individual flower.

IMG_2467IMG_2479

On the same sandy spit is a beautiful small clump of Bladder Campion (Silene vulgaris) . According to Sarah Raven it’s ‘edible and said to taste like peas – the young shoots are good in a spring salad or as quickly wilted greens’. ¬†However, as the clump is not very big I will leave them well alone.

IMG_2460 (2)

IMG_2462

Meanwhile, the beautiful Thrift continues to flower.

IMG_2488

Post script ¬† I’ve been alerted by Chloris from The Blooming Garden, to ‘Wildflower Wednesday’ and, although this was posted on Monday, I’ve decided to join in. ¬†I also think I might try to coordinate my future ‘Duver’ blogs with Wildflower Wednesday in the future.

With many thanks to Gail, who hosts Wildflower Wednesday from Clay and Limestone in Tennessee.