Tag Archives: Rosa St Swithun

End of month view – August 2016

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Much is looking rather exhausted in this EoMV.  It’s been so hot and I think the OH’s watering efforts when I’m in London consist of a little vague hose waving, which we all know doesn’t really cut the watering mustard!

Having said that, the annuals are finally getting going and the roses are putting on a much appreciated second flush.  Here’s R. ‘St Swithun’ surrounding the swing.IMG_1559

In this rather bleached photo you can see (in the centre) the Diascia personata is still flowering well, and there are Salvias too, but most of the other plants have gone over.  Late season interest from Aster frikartii Monch seems to have disappeared from this bed, although there are a couple of small plants limping along in the right hand Swing Bed.IMG_1558

In the Grass Bed the annuals are finally starting to fill out after a very late planting.  Here Ammi visnaga ‘Green Mist’, Cosmos bipinnatus ‘Fizzy White’, Calendula officinalis ‘Touch of Red Buff’ and self seeded Nasturtium ‘Black Velvet’ are jostling for position.

Although I did lose some of the Cosmos along the way, it’s filled out well despite the dry conditions.IMG_1560

I don’t think the Mid Century bed is doing as well as last year.  I’m missing the bright pink Malope as well as the Rhodochiton (which I’d grown up the obelisk).  I did plant some, but again the lack of water meant they never took off.  There are a few annuals struggling along here – Antirrhinum majus nanum ‘Black Prince’ as well as Amaranthus caudatus which may yet fill out with a bit more TLC.

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Lucky the dahlias and roses (here D. ‘La Recoleta’ and R.’Jubilee Celebration’) are doing their thing.IMG_1563

On the other side of the garden the Bronze Bed is rather overwhelmed by the Dahlia ‘Happy Single Date’.  I think next year I might have to reduce the number of plants from three to two, or even one, to get some variation here.  I loved the hot planting at Mottistone so perhaps should add a bit of (whisper it) red!IMG_1541

In the Veg Bed the Sweet Peas (yes I know they’re not veg) are rather mildewed, and the stems definitely shorter, but they’re still pumping out wonderfully scented blooms.  In front of these is a very handsome row of Chard ‘Pink flamingo’.  Sadly however, it seems to be remaining a very handsome row, which isn’t really the point.  We somehow don’t seem that interested in eating it.  Any top tips as to how best cook it?

Even further forward is Cavolo Nero ‘Black Magic’ and Broccoli ‘Early Purple Sprouting’.  I haven’t grown either of these previously, and they too have yet to undergo the taste test. IMG_1554

In front of the Veg the Agapanthus are still clinging on.IMG_1555

Some of you may remember that in the previous couple of years I borrowed a corner of a neighbour’s garden to use as a Cutting Patch.  I decided I didn’t really have time this year, but I am missing it.  I planted a few Zinnias (this one Z. elegans ‘Luminosa)’ in these raised beds, but they too are struggling with lack of water.  Behind there are yet more Diascias grown from cuttings.  I should probably move these into the Swing Beds with the rest.IMG_1548

Into the greenhouse and the tomatoes are in full flow.  I just love walking in and smelling that wonderful tomato smell, so redolent of summer.IMG_1549

In the pots a new Aubergine for me after multiple previous failures.  These ones are long but thin (clue’s in the name – Aubergine ‘Farmer’s Long’) which I think makes it easier for them to ripen.IMG_1550

Back outside for more pots.  The one below has been fantastic this year.  I love this little Pelargonium which was bought at the local Car Boot Sale and increased by cuttings.IMG_1561

The trough by the front steps is full of plants which, despite being tender, have overwintered in situ, including Gazanias and Chocolate Cosmos.IMG_1542

Here’s another shot of last Wednesday’s Morning Glory which is thriving under the glass canopy (where last year Sweet Peas sulked and turned their toes up!)

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Dahlias on the barrow are looking a little unhappy, whilst the Abutilon is fineIMG_1547

Pelargonium ‘Surcouf’ has been fabulous all summer, despite a certain amount of neglect.IMG_1553

In the troughs the Cosmos are finally getting going.  I deliberately planted the shorter Cosmos bipinnatus ‘Sonata White’ as I’m always bad at supporting them and this way they don’t flop so far.  There is also Salvia horminum ‘Oxford Blue’ here, but they’ve struggled to bulk up and are now having to compete with the Cosmos!IMG_1556

This last shot is really an aide memoire for me – just look how the two Pelargoniums are thriving whist the Salvia (back left) Dahlia (centre) and Scabious (back) struggle.  Some things so clearly like their roots in the ground it really is cruel to deny them!

And for my final pot you’ll have to wait for Wordless Wednesday later in the day!IMG_1551

With thanks to Helen at the Patient Gardener for hosting our EoMVs.

Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day – August 2016

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Finally, a showing from some of this year’s annuals – the one above, Zinnia elegans ‘Luminosa.’

I purchased a number of seeds back in October thinking I would repeat the last two years’ practice of using a corner of a neighbouring walled garden as a cutting garden, but I’ve been just too busy to and so have tried to squeeze everything in here.  And whilst it hasn’t been entirely successful, the annuals are starting to fill out in their various (not always ideal) spots.

In the Grass Bed I have Ammi visnaga ‘Green Mist’, Cosmos bipinnatus ‘Fizzy White’, Calendula officinalis ‘Touch of Red Buff’ and some self seeded nasturtiums from last year.IMG_1442

In the troughs I have the shorter Cosmos bipinnatus ‘Sonata White’ and the Salvia that was so successful in the cutting garden last year, Salvia horminum ‘Oxford Blue’.  In the cutting garden these turned into wonderful big bushes, I’m not sure they’ll ever get that big here as I always struggle to keep the troughs adequately watered.IMG_1439

In the Swing Beds these Antirrhinum majus ‘The Rose’ are finally getting going, but I’m not convinced about the colour, finding it a bit sickly.  IMG_1441

At the back of these beds I had planned to plant some tall dahlias but then decided they weren’t the right colour and so instead have planted an annual tobacco plant, Nicotiana mutablis. This one has both white and pink flowers on the same plants and grows to 1.2m.  It was planted out very late and so far this is the only plant to have flowered.  I’m hoping that by the end of the summer there will be quite a ‘froth’ of these but it may be I have left it just too late.IMG_1450

And in the Mid Century bed these Antirrinum, A. majus nanum ‘Black Prince’ are also blooming now and to my mind are a far better colour than the pink.IMG_1452

Away from the annuals, I have a some good repeating roses – R. St Swithun, IMG_1440

R. Munstead Wood,IMG_1448

R. Jubilee CelebrationIMG_1445

and R. Pat AustinIMG_1425

And plenty of dahlias still going, I’d like to say ‘strong’ but after the over purchasing earlier this year, I’ve ended up with a number in pots and they’re not too happy, so perhaps I’ll just stick with ‘going’.  Many have succumbed to powdery mildew and one has a whole colony of blackfly, which I’m not prepared to spray, so am currently praying for ladybirds!

The old favourite D. Happy Single Date (much darker when the blooms are young) has its roots firmly in the Bronze Bed and is thriving, IMG_1426

D. Fifteen Love (pertinent as Andy Murray is currently playing in the Olympic Gold medal match as I type), doing OK in a pot, IMG_1434

D. Bacardi, also doing pretty well in the two greenhouse pots,IMG_1431

D. Hillcrest Royal (very mildewed)IMG_1436

D. Tamburo, also rather mildewed IMG_1428

and D. La Recoleta, with a very nasty case of blackfly.IMG_1444

But to finish, a shot of my seed grown Agapanthus lining the back of the strawberry bed.  Not the greatest photo, but you get the idea.

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With thanks to Carol at May Dreams Gardens who hosts everyone’s GBBD.

Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day – June 2016

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I’m a day late for GBBD and have again not touched my garden for over a week due to a trip to Northumberland.  It was planned to coincide with picking up our daughter from uni in Durham, but sadly it also coincided with cold, misty, rainy weather, however I expect I’ll still share some garden visits, even if they’re rather grey!

I took these GBBD photos on my return from London this evening and these too are reflecting the rainy weather.  Bearing in mind my recent multiple absences a degree of skillful camera work was also required to avoid capturing large swathes of convolvulus…..

So, despite the rain, June is all about the roses.  My roses aren’t quite in the same league as the wonderful NT garden at Mottisfont I visited a couple of years ago, but I added some new ones last year, so the number is growing.  The top one, by the front gate, has a lovely scent but was inherited so I’m afraid I don’t know its name.

Below, one of the new roses last year, Jubilee Celebration, already a favourite,IMG_1068

later turns into this.IMG_1062

In the same bed are both Rosa ‘Munstead Wood’ (looking here rather paler than reality)IMG_1069

and climbing Rosa ‘Falstaff’IMG_1077

Another inherited rose in the Lavender bed is a very similar colour toIMG_1065

this Sarah Bernhardt peony.IMG_1067

On the pergola posts either side of the swing are Rosa ‘St Swithun’IMG_1072

and Rosa ‘Korizont.’IMG_1073

In the Bronze Beds the Pat Austin roses which featured in my last Monday vase, have been joined by self seeded Nasturtium ‘Caribbean Crush’IMG_1060

and this poppy, Papaver nudicale ‘Party Fun’IMG_1058

I’m delighted that another poppy, Papaver somniferum ‘Lauren’s Grape,’ has reappeared in the Mid Century bed.IMG_1063

Here too the Lysmachia atropurpurea, grown from seed last year, is filling out

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and has now been joined by a self seeded Malope trifida ‘Vulcan’.  I’ve grown more Malope from seed this year, but they’re all still sitting in a seed tray in the greenhouse.IMG_1079

 

The Alliums in the drive bed, Allium ‘Violet Beauty’, haven’t returned well from their introduction last year, but those that did return are looking good now.  Sadly, I’d added some new tulips, also called ‘Violet Beauty’ to join them, but the tulips came and went weeks ago. Back to the drawing board. IMG_1057

And to finish Meconopsis baileyi, a present from the OH for my birthday.  I wonder if I’ll mange to have it blooming this time next year?

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With thanks to Carol at May Dreams Gardens who hosts everyone’s GBBD.

Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day – December 2015

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Looking at the weather on my phone on Sunday morning provided a stark reminder of just how balmy life is down south:

St Helens, Isle of Wight 12C

Durham, (where my daughter’s at university) 0C

And while I was pottering around the garden taking photos of precocious December blooms, she was making this:

Snow

The rose above (which featured as buds in last week’s Wordless Wednesday) is an inherited one and I sadly don’t know its name.

Whilst plants such as the Salvias have ground to a halt, there are plenty more rose varieties still clinging on, including Rosa Flower Carpet PinkIMG_9692

R. St Swithun,IMG_9709

and finally, R. Jubilee Celebration.  I have to confess to having to lift this bloom as its head was definitely hanging down, but that had the benefit of keeping it immaculate.  This December is getting ridiculous!IMG_9716

Equally mad is the continued blooming of the Gazanias in the trough by the gate,IMG_9680

kept company by the Chocolate Cosmos, Cosmos atrosanguineus.  The trouble with them both still looking so good is that I can’t face pulling them out and bringing them under cover. Something I may well live to regret.  IMG_9683

Another tender plant I haven’t brought in is the Rhodochiton atrosanguineus, but as it’s taller than me and completely twined around the obelisk, I’m not sure how I would anyway.  The good news is that I have seedlings already through in the greenhouse, so hopefully I’m covered.IMG_9715

Another climber still looking good (and finally a plant that’s actually season appropriate) is the Clematis ‘Freckles’.IMG_9711

And to finish, one of my Zaluzianskya ovata cuttings, already flowering in its seed tray.  Bonkers.IMG_9696

With many thanks to Carol at May Dreams Gardens  for hosting everyone’s GBBD.  Why don’t you pop over and have a look at what everyone else has blooming now?

Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day – October 2015

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This month’s blooms share much in common with last month.  Many roses are still blooming well, Flower Carpet, above, Jubilee Celebration, belowIMG_8914

St SwithunIMG_8923

and Pat Austin.IMG_8906

Plenty of annuals are still hanging on, including Cosmos PurityIMG_8915

and Dazzler, in front of the matching Aster, Aster novae-angliae ‘September Ruby’IMG_8925

This has smaller flowers than Aster Frikartii Monch I was raving about last month, but has a good upright habit and masses of bright pink blooms.IMG_8921

Yet more pink is provided by Diascia Personata,IMG_8929

Achillea Cerise QueenIMG_8930

and the Rhodochiton atrosanguineus, still romping up the obelisk.IMG_8931

And to finish, two plants which seem currently unstoppable, Dahlia Happy Single DateIMG_8909

and good old Verbena BonariensisIMG_8911

With many thanks to Carol at May Dreams Gardens  for hosting everyone’s GBBD.  Why don’t you pop over and have a look at what everyone else has blooming now?

Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day – September 2015

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So it’s September, which has to be Aster time – see Aster Frikartii Monch above.  This is my definite favourite and I’m hoping next year my recent cuttings will be filling out the Swing Beds and forming a late purple haze together with the similar coloured Verbena bonariensis.

Another genus looking good now is Salvia.  I’m not 100% sure about all these names, but I think I have Salvia Dyson’s Crimson,IMG_8526

Salvia x jamensis ‘Stormy Sunrise’IMG_8515

Salvia microphylla ‘Cerro Potosi’IMG_8510

and Salvia East Friesland

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There are plenty of pelagoniums still going strong, the first two unnamed, IMG_8507IMG_8503

and then P. SurcoufIMG_8504

and this dainty scented pelargonium, P Pink Capitatum.  The flowers are much smaller than the ones above, but I love the markings and the bright green, scented foliage.IMG_8502

And many of the roses are back for a second appearance – Rosa Flower Carpet, with a huge number of budsIMG_8492

Rosa KorizontIMG_8513

This one a gift from my friend Louise at the beautiful Old Rectory Garden – Rosa Jacques Cartier.IMG_8511

This is St Swithun, growing up the front of the swing pergolaIMG_8514

and Rosa Munstead Wood, new this year in the Mid Century bed,IMG_8525

and now joined by the similarly coloured dahlia, D. Downham Royal.IMG_8524

Other dahlias include D. Happy Single Date, in the Bronze Bed,IMG_8538

and D. Fifteen love (bought from Waitrose of all places, and still in its pot while I decide whether I should squeeze it into the Bronze Bed with the one above)IMG_8500

And to finsh, a couple of annuals still looking good – magnificent Molucella

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and still very fresh to look at (although now rather collapsed in habit!) Malope.IMG_8530

With many thanks to Carol at May Dreams Gardens  for hosting everyone’s GBBD.  Why don’t you pop over and have a look at what everyone has has blooming now?

A rosy glow

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I’ve been laid rather low since the new year with some weary inducing virus, topped off by conjunctivitis, and as a result haven’t felt like tackling any outside jobs.  Instead I’ve spent many languid hours curled up with gardening blogs, magazines, books and seed catalogues, but sometimes you just have to (wo)man up  and get out there, and today was the day.

I wasn’t really feeling up to proper digging (I still have my new bed to dig) and so instead tackled my climbing roses which had got rather out of hand towards the back end of last year.  I have to say rose pruning was something I found rather scary when I first arrived here as I’d never grown roses before and had inherited quite a few (and now planted a lot more).  However I’ve quickly grown to love it and find myself drifting into a totally absorbed, Zen like meditative state!  It seems to me that roses (all plants really) inherently want to grow and therefore I don’t think there’s much I can do with my trusty secateurs to upset them (particularly when I’ve seen how the shrub roses in a National Trust cottage down the road bounce back, when their pruning appears to be achieved with a chain saw!)

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This is the before picture.  The front two uprights have Rosa St Swithun (pictured top and below) and Clematis Freckles growing up them. 

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These St Swithuns, and the two behind , Rosa Korizont, see below, are climbers, whereas the two on the outside pillars are ramblers.

Rosa KorizontIMG_2286

There is some confusion about what the ramblers are, and in fact I have just looked back in my records and realised I’ve been misleading myself and you too with my posts last year.  I thought I’d ordered Rambling Rector and received one Rambling Rector (on the outside left hand pillar) and one other, which I’d decided was Snow Goose.  However, having just checked back in my records, I realised I’d actually ordered Rosa Alberic Barbier, which must be the rose on the right, making the one on the left the mystery, as it clearly isn’t Rambling Rector.  

I’ve just had a look at the David Austin website and think it might be Kew Rambler, but what ever it is, it certainly isn’t another Alberic Barbier!

Mystery rambler:

June

June

Rosa Alberic Barbier (with Digitalis Suttons Apricot)

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Whatever the roses are, they have all had a very good tidy and a rather brutal cut back.

 

The after picture is a little fuzzy as by the time I’d finished it was heading towards 5pm and there was very little light left so I’m afraid this is camera shake from the long exposure.

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I still need to give them a feed and a good mulch of well rotted manure, but a very satisfying afternoon’s activity.  Worthy of a rosy glow?  Well maybe, but there’s something else.

Last week I was delighted to hear that Julie, at Gardening Jules, had nominated me for the Liebster award.

As Julie explained on her blog, “it’s an award from one blogger to another and a way of letting other folk know about blogs you enjoy to read”.  To accept I need to answer 11 questions from Julie, then select 5 blogs I’d like to share and then ask my nominees 11 questions. Choosing young blogs with less than 200 followers is good too.

My answers to Julie’s questions are:-

1. Do you encourage wildlife to your garden?

Yes, I try to.  There are certainly ‘wild’ areas, as well as food for the birds and a bug hotel, but we don’t currently have a pond, which would definitely help with wildlife.

2. Do you grow organically and use natural methods?

This is a tricky one.  I tend to, but have a husband who’s not as convinced.  For example, I used the wool pellets ‘Slug Gone’ to protect my hostas last year, and they were pretty successful. However, one time when I’d moaned about some slug nibbling, the OH was straight round with the little blue pellets.  I wasn’t happy….

3. Any tips for recycling plastic?

No easy answers here.  I think the key is to avoid/reuse as much as possible.

4. Any recommendations for flowers to arrange in your home?

Lots!  However I think one of my favourites has to be Cosmos.  I love daisy flowers anyway, there are many different Cosmos varieties to choose from and they are SOOOOO productive, you can pick armsful through the season

5. Have you tried edible flowers?

Yes, I like adding nastutium and calendula to salads, and have frozen borage fowers in ice cubes to put in Pimms!

6. A favourite fruit recipe?

This isn’t quite the right recipe as Deb Perelman, who writes the Smitten Kitchen blog has written a book and there is a different Lemon Bar recipe in that.  However I love this blog so I’m sure this one will be good too.

http://smittenkitchen.com/blog/2008/01/lemon-bars/

7. A favourite vegetable recipe?

I ‘m hoping I’m allowed to call tomatoes a vegetable, in which case I offer up Panzanella:

http://www.jamieoliver.com/recipes/bread-recipes/panzanella-tuscan-tomato-bread-salad/

8. Do you like to create anything other than flower arrangements using natural materials?

I’d love to be able to weave with willow, but never have, so just flower arrangements for me.

9. How do you feel about growing natives or non natives?

I’m relaxed about both.  I think we have to be careful about what is introduced, but think it would be a terrible shame not enjoy non native plants.

10. Any recommendations for an unusual fruit or vegetable that is good to eat?

This is another trick one.  I do try to try new things but have often been disappointed.  a recent case in point was my Cucamelons.  Revolting!  Likewise Electric Daisies.

Something I do like to grow are the small Padron Peppers which have a bit of heat and can be cooked up with olive oil and sea salt and used as a starter.  And also the Pumpkin Munchkin, which are a single serving size and can be grown up bamboo and so don’t take up too much ground space.

11. Do you have a good view from your home?

Yes.  We pretty much bought the house for the view.  From one side you can see south across Bembridge Harbour towards Bembridge and from the other, east towards the Solent.  The views are actally better in the winter when the trees are bare.

 So those were my answers, here are my questions
1.  Why did you start to blog?
2.  What’s your favourite post you’ve posted?
3.  And why?
4.  What’s the favourite/most interesting thing you’ve learnt from reading others’ blogs?
5.  What’s your favourite book?
6.  What’s your favourite film?
7.  Who would play you in a film about your life?
8.  What’s your view on GM crops?
9.  Do you play a musical instrument?
10. Do you prefer dogs or cats?
11. Sausage roll or chocolate eclair?

And the blogs I’d like to nominate are

Sussex Prairies

 Dig with Dorris

Edinburgh Garden Diary

Railway Parade House and Garden

Brookend Cottage Garden

 

End of month view – October 2014

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I’m joining Helen at The Patient Gardener’s end of month meme a day late, apologies!

The picture above shows the lovely Cercis canadensis ‘Forest Pansy’ peeking over the willow fence and matching beautifully with the self sown vine.  The picture was taken earlier in the week and sadly, already the cercis leaves are starting to fall.

Elsewhere in the garden there are still vestiges of summer to admire with the St Swithun Rose (yes I know it should have been tied up) arching over the swing in the sunshineIMG_5262

and succulents still flowering outside.IMG_5248

The Swing Beds are still showing some colour with penstemons, salvias and asters, but there’s a lot of chaos (certainly the climbing roses) and I still need to dig up the sisyrinchiums which are taking over the front of both beds.  I think I should also look at dividing some of the perennials, particularly the geraniums.IMG_5253

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The shady bed continues to look good despite no flowers.  I love the structure the caster oil plant, Fatsia japonica provides at the back of this bed.IMG_5276

In the veg patch there isn’t much to see apart from Chard (below) and a number of collapsed structures which need to be taken down.IMG_5256

With regard to fruit, there is still a small crop of autumn raspberries, as you might expect, IMG_5258

but I certainly wasn’t expecting this!  Strawberries in November – the world’s gone mad!IMG_5255

In the greenhouse I haven’t yet cropped my Mini Belle Yellow peppers.  To be honest now I’ve grown them, I’m not quite sure what to do with them.  Somehow I don’t have much need for raw peppers to add to a picnic for snacking any more….IMG_5277

Also in the greenhouse, over the last few weeks I’ve done something I haven’t done before, which is to let my Sungold Tomatoes do their own thing, unrestricted .  Having carefully pinched out the side shoots on all my tomatoes up until the end of September, I read/heard somewhere that Sungold can continue cropping until December under glass, and so, whilst all the other tomatoes will very shortly be pulled up, I’m just letting the Sungolds do what they want and then I’ll see whether I can harvest any more.

Of course one of the problems with this is that the plants are now right up to the top of the greenhouse and impossible to reach without a chair or ladder, but as they are my favourite tomato to eat raw, I feel a little mountaineering will be worth it.IMG_5278

I’ve also been busy taking cuttings of lavenders and pelagoniums.  I went to a talk at our local horticultural society recently and the speaker, one of the lecturers at the Isle of Wight college, said he always takes cutting into seed trays, and crams in 20!  I’ve always tended to put 4 or 5 around the edge of a terracotta pot, but I thought I’d try his method (although I drew the line at 12) and see how I get on.IMG_5279

Over in the ‘borrowed’ garden, the OH has been busy strimming all the brambles on the far side of the wall so that we can now see the recently arrived sheep.  There are still annuals flowering in the bed in front of the wall – Cosmos, Cleomes and Amaranthus – but the Ammi have pretty much given up.

A little later in the year, when the hawthorn trees are dormant, I’ll need to prune them into shape and tie in the required new growth.  Overall I’ve been delighted with how well they settled in since planting them at the beginning of February.

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And the Tithonia ‘hedge’ I mentioned in my GBBD post is also still going strong, although not quite as strongly as a couple of weeks ago.

Cathy at Rambling in the Garden queried my measurements but I don’t think I was far out. There are 11 plants and the bed must be nearly 20ft long and some of the plants are definitely taller than me (alright, not many!) and I’m 5ft 7.  Believe me now?

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End of month view – September 2014

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The trouble with going somewhere as amazing as West Dean (see my last post) is that your own garden can’t help but suffer by comparison.  But, having said that, it’s always good to see fabulous gardens as they hopefully inspire us to do better.

Like West Dean, I do have some Asters, including this inherited one which is very tall and has flopped badly, but still makes a wonderful showIMG_5050

but this one, Aster Frikartii Monch, in the left hand Swing Bed, is much better.  It’s still a little floppy, but a better colour and a much bigger flower.  I love the way it goes with the Verbena bonariensis.  (I think the colour is a better match in real life than in the photo).IMG_5046

In the right hand Swing Bed, you can see the matching Aster as well as the out of control Rosa Snow Goose.  I think a ladder and a pair of gaunlets is called for.IMG_5048

On the posts either side of the swing the rose Rosa St Swithun is having a lovely second flush.  I really need to tie these branches in too, but think I’ll leave it until they’ve finished flowering now.

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The Grass Bed is looking a little better now that the Nasturtiums have recovered from the drought.  I like the colour combination of the orange of both the Nasturtium and the Fox and Cubs with the purple Salvia, but this bed still desperately needs a good sort out.

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In the veg patch, likewise, the runner and french beans have all recovered from the drought and are cropping well.  However the Pumpkin Munchkins have finished and need to be brought in.  Some of the courgettes are still going strong, but nearly all have succumbed to mildew.IMG_5045

By the conservatory the (inherited) Nerines are coming into flower.  They always strike me as a rather incongruous plant for this time of year, but at least they add some colour.IMG_5038

In the greenhouse, as well as lots of tomatoes (yum),IMG_5060

and Cucamelons (not so yum!)IMG_5056

I’ve finally got peppers, both the long pointy red ones (well they will be one day)

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as well as some rather sweet little orange onesIMG_5059

Many pots are still going strong, but most won’t survive the winter and so will have to be moved into the greenhouse – never a trivial task!IMG_5040

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And to finish, a quick catch up of my ‘borrowed’ garden.  The Tithonia and Sunflowers featured last month continue to bloom their golden socks offIMG_5071

but the real development is a bed I created underneath the hornbeams we pleached earlier in the year (see part 1 and Part 2).  The hornbeams need a bit of a hair cut now, but have taken really well and I’m looking forward to seeing the blossom in the spring.

Again, like the Tithonia and Sunflowers, all the flowers here are annuals, but this time on a pink theme including Cleomes and Cosmos as well as the greens of Molucella and Amaranthus.  It really is amazing what you can achieve in one season with a few hands full of annual seeds!IMG_5066

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With many thanks, as ever, to Helen at the Patient Gardener,  for hosting everyone’s End of Month views.