Tag Archives: Ricinus communis Carmencita

End of Month view – November 2017

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A rather autumnal shot to start this month’s Endof Month View,ispast the yellowing mulberry towards the swing.  This mulberry was in a pot for years and is still barely fruiting now despite  having its feet in the ground.

My mother in law was kind enough to buy me a Mulberry ‘Charlotte Russe’ (the RHS plant of the year 2017) for my birthday earlier this year and, as one of its attributes is supposedly early fruiting, it will be interesting to see if it overtakes this rather more established plant!

This shot shows the magnificent Ricinus communis ‘Carmencita’, still in rude health.

In the troughs the stocks grown from cuttings are looking much more established and there are still flowers on the Pelagonium.

Likewise the Pelagonium ‘Surcouf’ still has the odd bloom.

The Veg patch is in a state of general collapse and needs clearing and mulching, but at least the Diving Lady’s pool has been newly planted with Muscari.

In the Swing Beds there is little to now see except the Salvias.

and rose hips –  I’m hoping the birds leave these alone so I can pick them for Christmas decorations.

The Grass Bed was cleared a while ago and has now been planted with daffodils and tulips.  However, bearing in mind the thievery which went on last year, serious precautions have been taken..

Walking past the house you can see the Rose carpet roses are still, rather incongruously, pumping out their bright pink blooms.

Past the tin bath and whilst the Osteospermum and Gazanias are shrugging off the chill, the rather crispy looking plant at the front off this shot is (was) a Chocolate Cosmos.  I really don’t learn as I’ve lost these plants before.  Whilst we’re blessed with a very mild climate here, they really are not remotely hardy.  (Note to self Jen!)

The leaves are nearly all off the Cercis, with just this pair clinging on in the sunshine.

The Bronze Bed is now largely a tangle of decaying dahlia stems which need to be cut down

but in amongst there is still the odd jewel!

Climbing up the wooden support for the glass awning is this Clematis ‘My Angel’.  I bought it from a specialist Clematis nursery but sadly it’s been really disappointing.  The flowers, which are similar in shape to ‘tangutica’ but supposed to be tawny/orange (to match the Bronze Bed which is directly in front) turned out to be rather insipid in the flesh, and also really small.  Not surprisingly, the seedheads are also really small which is a shame as I think they’re lovely in arrangements but I don’t think these would really work.

The jury’s out as to whether ‘My angel’ will get sent to plant heaven!

The succulents have now been tucked under the glass awning but I think if really cold weather is forecast that won’t be protection enough and they’ll need moving again.

This sink, however, is currently still out in the open and, having only been planted up this year has filled out really well.  In my enthusiasm to show it off, however, I did completely miss the enormous nettle in the bed behind.  Oops.

Here’s yet another pink Pelagonium, this one bought on the cheap from Waitrose.  It’s a perfect match for the Flower Carpet roses so I’ve just taken a whole lot of cuttings with the view of filing a big pot of them next summer.

Into the greenhouse and the banana (not my purchase!) is annoyingly looking better than ever

and there are plenty of cuttings coming along well.

One thing not looking so good is the state of the glass.  I hate cleaning the greenhouse (let’s face it, I hate cleaning) but this is definitely something on the jobs list

together with barrowing all this around

oh, and still planting the rest of these:

Wish me luck!

With thanks to Steve at Glebe House who hosts EoMV.

End of month view – October 2017

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Today’s ‘End of Month View’ features photos actually taken on Friday as it was such a beautiful day I was compelled to capture it.

This first view is over the statuesque Ricinus communis ‘Carmencita’ to Bembridge harbour beyond.  Amazing to think that, as a half hardy annual, the Ricinus was just a seed eight months ago!IMG_3637

Walking across the decking there are still blooms on the Pelargonium ‘Surcouf’

as well as in various other pots.

Round to the Strawberry Bed you can see the Agapanthus are rather taking over.  I have now chopped back the seed heads, but I fear the strawberries are being squeezed out.

The  Swing Beds still have a bit of colour, largely from the Salvias, but also the Verbena bonariensis and a few asters and rosesIMG_3651

The pergola is luxuriantly draped in Clematis cirrhosa ‘Freckles’, but surely the amazing thing about this shot is the colour of the sky!IMG_3653

This Grass Bed photo is one of total chaos, and is in fact is no longer representative as I spent Saturday afternoon pulling out all the spent annuals and rediscovering the Stipa tenuissima at the back, which give the bed its name.  Dozens and dozens of Nasturtium seeds fell onto the bed as I was clearing, so next year they’ll be back with a similar vengeance unless I’m very determined.

I finally got my bulb order in last weekend and this bed is destined to be one of the beneficiaries. Last year the vast majority of bulbs planted here were eaten by some critter or other, so I’m hoping next year will be more successful.

In the left hand Lavender Bed I’m delighted that my little silk tree Albizia julibrissin ‘Ombrella’ is doing well –

it’s already come a long way from this twig (see to the left of this photo from April).  I wonder if next year it will flower?IMG_2355

Walking round the house to the western end of the garden takes you first past the Flower Carpet roses, looking ridiculously perky,

and then the old tin bath, also full of summery Gazanias and Osteospermums.

Once round the corner things take a definitely autumnal turn, 

but you’ve got to love that Cercis – talk about bonfire night!

Back round to the greenhouse, and you have to admire the continuing blooms of the greenhouse pots.  These have been blooming non stop since June and have been an absolute joy. 

The greenhouse, however, has not been such a joy.  It’s latterly suffered an infestation of whitefly, so I’ve hoiked nearly everything out, discarding all the tomatoes and cucumbers

and leaving pretty much everything else outside like a mad ‘bring and buy’ plant sale.

Fingers crossed the whitefly expire before the temperature drops – and anyone with any whitefly tips, please do share!  

With thanks to Steve, at Glebe House Garden, who now hosts End of Month views.

End of month view – September 2017

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The best bit about this view is the newly mown, stripy lawn – thanks hubs!

Taking the usual End of Month tour takes us firstly past the metal troughs which have been taken over by two enormous, self seeded Shoo-fly plants (Nicandra physalodes).  I confessed last month that the Cosmos and trailing Sweet peas planted in the troughs this year were unhappy with such hot roots, so I’ve let the Shoo-flies take over.

The plan for next year is an abundance of Pelargoniums – reckon they’ll be happier?IMG_3322

Talking of unhappy, the Veg Patch is a little sorry now too.  Not only have the cutting flowers largely given upIMG_3325

but the Diving Lady’s pool has dried up, and the beans have fallen over.IMG_3327

And those of a sensitive disposition look away now – I seem to be feeding the Island’s Cabbage White caterpillar population with my ‘Flower Sprouts.’

The Flower Sprouts are a cross between kale and Brussel sprouts, which supposedly grow ‘baby’ kales (kalettes), at the leaf axils (where you’d ordinarily find the Brussels).  I’ve been trying to convince myself that I don’t need the leaves as they’re not the crop, but I guess without the leaves there is no ‘engine’ to grow the ‘kalettes’.  Hmmm.IMG_3324

On a cheerier note the Swing Beds are still colourful, with even a Lupin in bloom.IMG_3330

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On the Swing Pergola itself there is a veil of flowering Clematis cirrhosa ‘Freckles.’IMG_3336

Whilst up close they’re very pretty, from a distance I have to admit they’re rather a mess!IMG_3334

Interestingly, the Cosmos in the Grass Bed which got damaged in earlier windy weather, has now all but disappeared, with the white Malopes and self seeded Nasturtiums taking over.  IMG_3338

In the Mid Century Bed the Ricinus communis ‘Carmencita’ has been hauled back upright having flopped right over the path, and is still providing fabulous foliage to accompanyIMG_3319

the remaining blooms, particularly the Dahlia ‘La Recoleta’ and the roses.

I’m also delighted that the Cercis canadensis ‘Forest Pansy’ (planted in April) has survived despite my rather haphazard attentions over the summer and is now looking settled.

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The Silk Tree (Albizia julibrissin f rosea), planted at the same time as the Cercis, is also fine, but looking a little overwhelmed by the Asters in the photo below!

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In the Greenhouse beds, my clearing of the Nasturtiums last month (in an effort to expose some soil for the poppies to self seed) didn’t exactly go to plan.  Instead, the Nasturtiums are back in force and sadly, there’s no sign of any poppy seedlings.IMG_3342

In the Greenhouse Pots, a Sarah Raven combo has been flowering for months – Arctotis ‘Flame’ and Thunbergia ‘African Sunset.’

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Whilst in the greenhouse, most things are coming to an end,IMG_3343

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the cuttings are just beginning.IMG_3344

One thing I’m hoping to grow more of is this Pelargonium ‘Choun Cho.’IMG_3345

Along by the house, the Flower Carpet roses are back with a vengeance and smothered in buds.

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Buds too on the Nerines.IMG_3351

Round the corner the inherited roses by the gate are reflecting the (definitely inherited!) pampas.

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In the tin bath at the top of the steps, the Osteospermum ‘Serenity Rose Magic’ (also from Sarah Raven) have survived best of everything in here.  I took plenty of cuttings at the weekend so hopefully I’ll have more next year.IMG_3353

The Bronze Bed is still doing well – the ‘Happy Single Dates’ are only looking a little thin because I’d picked loads for a big vase.

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And to finish, better late than never.  My neighbour gave me seedlings of Morning Glory ahead of June’s garden opening, but sadly I didn’t get them planted out until quite some time later.  But look, they’re flowering now – thanks Rosy!

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With thanks too to Steve, at Glebe House Garden, who has taken over hosting End of Month views.

Sir Harold Hillier garden revisited

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Back in February I visited the stunning 4 acre winter gardens at the Sir Harold Hillier gardens in Hampshire, and at that time vowed to return to see the Centenary Borders looking rather better than they were then:IMG_0446

Fast forward six months and they were absolutely magnificent.  At over 250 metres long, they’re the longest double borders in the UK and comprise over 30,000 plants.  The aerial photo below is from the garden’s website and shows the incredible scale of the endeavour.Pond

The planting was all still looking fresh and vigorous which I think is impressive as we head to late August.IMG_8341

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And there were some lovely plant combinations like the salvia and perovskia with the dahlia IMG_8292

and the amaranthus with the grass.IMG_8301

There were a couple of similarly coloured sedums, Sedum ‘Marchants Best Red’ andIMG_8304

Sedum Red Cauli.  I particularly like this latter one and wonder whether I might find room for it in the Mid Century Bed.IMG_8299

Whilst many of the agapanthus in the borders were finished, this incredibly dark one, Agapanthus Black Magic was still in perfect condition and really striking.  It’s so dark it was actually quite hard to photograph and you’d have to be very careful where you placed it to provide a contrasting background. IMG_8338

And back to the dark red theme, there were a number of these Ricinus at over a metre tall.  I grew Ricinus communis ‘Carmencita’ from seed earlier in the year and now have four or five in 9cm pots. The question is what on earth am I going to do with them now?  Whilst one might look good in the new Mid Century bed, sadly I don’t have 250m of double borders to fill, so don’t really think I’ve got the space for them. Perhaps Hilliers would like a couple more?

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From the Centenary Borders we walked on to Jermyn’s House, the previous residence of the Hillier family, the site of February’s lovely snowdrop display, and most importantly the location for my coffee and cake stop.

However, it wasn’t the cake that stopped me in my tracks, but the fabulous planting against the house.  IMG_8313

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It was absolutely stunning.  Many of the flowers I’d grown either this year or in the past (Nicotiana Lime Green, Rudbeckia Cherry Brandy, Amaranthus caudatus ‘Viridis’) but they’d also succeeded with Zinnia Queen Red Lime (the one Zinnia I failed with this year) and brought them all together to produce a bold, brilliant whole.   One of my favourite borders EVER!

I definitely predict some Jermyn’s House inspired revisions to my Bronze Bed next year. IMG_8314

And to finish, one plant I didn’t know, this gorgeous, simple dahlia.  I was so struck with it I asked a member of staff what it was and she confessed it was a ‘rogue’ – not the dahlia they’d ordered and so she couldn’t identify it.

However, she explained that it had been bought from a local supplier, and that let to a whole new adventure….IMG_8327