Tag Archives: Ranunculus

Yearly round up – 2015

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2015 was the first time I’d planted dozens of tulips directly in the Swing Beds, having previously faffed about planting them in pots and then moving them in and out.  And, in classic gardening happenstance, they didn’t flower as I’d planned at all!  The tulips I’d planted as mids, ‘Pink Impression’ (above) flowered first, and on their own, and then these were followed by (supposedly) April flowering ‘Mistress’ and May flowering ‘Menton’ flowering together (below). The whole show was an absolute joy.

This year I’ve planted more tulips, but in the two new beds, so time will tell as to how perennial these three in the Swing Beds out to be.IMG_7022

As well as the tulips I also planted more Alliums.  I found the new Alliums ‘Violet Beauty’, a little disappointing, but the extra A. Purple Sensation I added, were fabulous as ever.IMG_7231

And the Diving Lady got a new, early bath in the form of Iris reticulata ‘Blue Note’.

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As well as new bulbs, 2016 saw the creation of two new beds, firstly the ‘Mid Century Bed’, below, named after the lovely metal structure the OH bought me for my big birthday.

The theme was supposed to be bruised, purply colours, but, as with the bulbs, there was a welcome ‘mistake’ to enjoy in the form of this Ranunculus, theoretically ‘Purple Heart’, but I rather think not.IMG_7715

I planted some roses for this new bed too, including R. Jubilee Celebration (no, not very bruised either!)IMG_7967

and Rosa ‘Falstaff Climbing’ to grow up the obelisk, but the plant that really stole the climbing show this year was the ‘Rhodochiton atrosanguineus‘.

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The second new bed has a bronze or orangey theme.

 

Many of the plants were grown from seed, including this Nasturtium ‘Caribbean Crush’ and the beautiful grass Hordeum Jubatum.IMG_8240IMG_7930

There was another new rose here too, R. Pat Austin.IMG_8906

And later in the year the ridiculously floriferous Dahlia ‘Happy Singe Date’.  This just went on and on and formed the basis of numerous peachy vases of flowers.

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In June I opened the garden for the third time as part of a village group opening, in aid of the island’s Earl Mountbatten hospice.  I had over 150 visitors and some lovely comments.IMG_7889

Also in 2015 I was lucky enough to visit numerous gardens both on and off the island, including the Sir Harold Hillier garden in February (and again in August)IMG_0411

Arundel Castle in May,IMG_7089

Mottistone Manor in June,IMG_7677

Osborne House in (March and) August

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and Great Dixter IMG_9124

and Bodnant in October.2015-10-29 11.28.44 HDR

As well as my own garden and garden visiting, I dipped in and out of Cathy’s lovely ‘In  a vase on Monday’ meme, including sharing the saga of the wedding flowers 

as well as this group of vases created in October when the OH became captain of his golf club.IMG_9349

And, on the basis that it’s a very rare gardener that ever stops learning, I went on courses at Great Dixter, Common Farm Flowers and West Dean.  And then, to top it all, in September signed up for a Level 3 course in Plants and Planting Design at Capel Manor college, which I’m absolutely loving.  Which reminds me, I really need to get on with my holiday homework!

Wishing you and yours a fabulous, flowery 2016, and thank you so much for supporting Duver Diary with your views, likes and comments.

In a vase on Monday – more Birthday celebrations

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Although my daughter’s not 18 until the end of July, she decided to have her party to coincide with the end of her A Levels, and so Friday saw me running around getting ready before her arrival back from her last exam after lunch.

She only had around 20 guests and wanted them all to sit down to eat so we borrowed next door’s garden table, and, lacking the pre-planning to have organised a table cloth,  I fiddled about with flowers.  I thought about some prettier vases but was concerned they might get damaged and so plumped for rustic tin cans.

The choice of flowers was very much governed by what was plentiful or shortly to go over.  As some of you will remember, I’m opening the garden next Sunday for the local hospice and so was reticent to pick any ‘important’ blooms like peonies, which will hopefully still be blooming in a week’s time (and would probably have tipped the cans over anyway!)

I didn’t take any proper photos as there was a marquee to erect and decorate, a cake to make and a lot of furniture to move, so these are just zoomed in from the original.

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The bloom, included Sedum, Pinks, Alchemilla mollis, Ranunculus, Lychnis, Sweet Peas, Nepeta Six Hills Giant and the lovely blue spire at the top of the photo above.  I have two quite big clumps of this and love it in flower arranging as I like the way the flowers curve.  The question is, does anyone know what it is?  I think it could be a Veronica or a Veronicastrum but I can’t seem to find the lable and I’d love to know.IMG_7781b

I’m delighted to say the party went without a hitch, and even more delighted (and astonished) that a number of guests admired the garden – I don’t think gardens were on my radar at 18!

Why don’t you go over to Cathy’s at Rambling in the Garden and see what others have in their Monday vases.

In a vase on Monday – on a desk!

 

I don’t normally work on Mondays, but today was the exception and also the first time I’ve brought flowers to the office since I’ve been back at work.

The flowers travelled up with me from the island, (together with many Isle of Wight Festival leavers) wrapped in cling film (the flowers, not the Festival leavers). They always come out looking a little crushed but generally bounce back

At my old job I took flowers to work every week in the summer and always concentrated on sweet peas as I love the scent so much.  This week the arrangement is largely sweet peas, but they’ve been joined by a couple of newcomers.  Firstly, Dianthus Green Trick.  This was bought as plugs from Sarah Raven, but I’ve then propagated more by taking cuttings.  I really like the fresh green they provide.

In addition, and linking to my earlier GBBD post, are couple of sugar pink Ranunculus.  And no, these are even less Purple Heart than the cerise ones, but they look pretty here and will hopefully last well

Just a short post as I’m struggling to blog on my iPad, but it’s always fun to join in. Why don’t you go and have a look at what other bloggers have arranged in their Monday vases?

With thanks as ever to Cathy at Rambling in the Garden for hosting.

Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day – June 2015

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Aside from the roses, sweet peas and peonies, there are numerous other blooms blooming this month.  These Calendula ‘Bronze Beauty’ are taking up probably too much of the new Bronze Bed, but as little else is flowering there yet, I’ll indulge their cheery contribution.  One other bloom flowering here is another one grown from seed – this one, Nasturtium Caribbean Crush, I’m also not entirely convinced about, but, as with the marigold, I’m not turfing it out until there’s something else to look at.IMG_7713

In a similar colour vein, in the trough by the front steps I’ve got a dark purple Pelargonium, Gazania and Parrot’s Beak, Lotus berthelotii, combo going on.  It’s still filling out, but when the sun’s shining and the Gazanias are fully out, it makes a jolly greeting to visitors.IMG_7709

Meanwhile, in the new Mid Century Bed, the planned ‘Bruised’ colour palette has been completely frustrated by numerous Ranunculus in this shocking cerise.  The bulbs I planted were labled Ranunculus Purple Heart, but not one of them has come up any deeper than this one, and, like so many gardening ‘mistakes’ I love them!IMG_7715

In the Grass Bed, which has finally been denuded of its tatty forget me nots, I’ve planted a few of these Catananche caerulea which look lovely together with the stipa behind and the self seeded Cerinthe in front.  According to the RHS website they can be propagated by division in spring or by root cuttings in winter.  I should really diary to do that as they’re lovely – although only about 60cm tall they have the same airiness of Verbena bonariensis, and work well in a bed where I wouldn’t want anything too tall.IMG_7717

Lastly, one of many self seeded poppies.  I have pulled a few out, but mostly I just enjoy them, wherever they’ve landed.IMG_7718

With thanks to Carol at May Dreams Gardens  for hosting everyone’s GBBD.

In a vase on Monday – Common Farm Flowers

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I’m linking this post to Cathy’s ‘In a vase on Monday’ meme because so much of what Georgie Newbury, from Common Farm Flowers,  said during her talk reminded me of this meme and the joy we’ve all had from it.

Georgie is a flower farmer and now also author of the wonderful ‘The Flower Farmer’s Year’, a book I was so excited about I pre-ordered it.  Neither the book, nor Georgie in person, disappoint.  Her tone is that of a knowledgeable friend, bursting to share her knowledge and love of plants, growing and floristry, and I found her talk captivating.

Rather than flogging either her book or her beautiful bouquets, her talk was all about inspiring people to grow and arrange their own.  And at this time of year, going in the garden and searching out whatever might be available to cut, just as we all do for our Monday vases.2015-03-17 18.28.39

During her talk Georgie created a beautiful, informal hand tied bunch (which sadly I failed to photo as she gave it to her aunt who was in the audience!)

Her foliage was all from her farm, Poplar, Pussy Willow, Black Elder and Hawthorn.2015-03-17 19.49.25

However, the blooms were largely from her suppliers in Cornwall as she lives in a frost pocket and struggles to produce flowers before April.  Flowers included Narcissus (Soleil D’Or and Paperwhite) and lots of gorgeous Ranunculus.2015-03-17 19.55.30

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She shared numerous tips (don’t pick flowers when you can feel the sun on the back of your head, so early morning or after 7 at night, pull bulbs when picking to get a longer stem, always pick directly into water – no romantic wandering with a trug, keep everything scrupulously clean and change the container water regularly to prolong vase life…) as well as numerous supplier tips.   Interestingly many I already use – Chiltern and Higgledy Garden for seeds, David Austin for roses, Peter Nyssen and Avon for bulbs – but also others like Withypitts for dahlias and Hillhouse Nursery for shrubs.

Like Mark Diacono for vegetable growing, she encourages people to grow things that are unusual and unavailable in the shops.  She had a few suggestions of less well known plants including the bulb, Ornithogalum, the slatey purple flowered Delphinium D. requienii and she also loves the Iris below, Iris tuberosa.  It has a relatively short season but is so different to anything else.2015-03-17 19.54.44

I’m already booked on a course at Common Farm later in the year and hearing Georgie talk has just made me even more excited.

With thanks as ever to Cathy at Rambling in the Garden for hosting the lovely ‘In a vase on Monday’ meme.  I’m sure Georgie would approve!