Tag Archives: Pelargonium sidoides

Greenhouse Review – mid June 2015

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Like Julie at Peonies and Posies who hosts this meme, things have calmed down in the greenhouse this month.  The vast majority of seedlings have been turfed out to fend for the themselves (and we’ll gloss over the fact that many haven’t actually travelled very far from the greenhouse, are in an unruly array just outside the door…)

At the back of the greenhouse I have sweet peas for the first time.  Firstly Lathyrus tingitanus,

IMG_7705in my view, one of the prettiest flowers, but sadly no scent, so in addition I’ve planted Lathyrus Juliet, which is just starting to flower, and smells gorgeous.  Hopefully I’ll manage to grab the odd moment to sit at the table and enjoy them both.

On either side of the sweet peas are bamboo supports with a variety of tomatoes – this year, ‘Sungold’, ‘Gardener’s Delight’, ‘Black Cherry’, ‘Country Taste’, ‘Ferline’ and ‘Green Zebra’.  All were new to me this year except ‘Sungold’, which is a firm favourite.  And all grown from seed (all seed from Chilterns except ‘Green Zebra’ which was from Sarah Raven).  In addition to the tomatoes I have mini cucumbers ‘La Diva’ as well as Melon ‘Sweetheart’.  I’ve only tried melon once before and it was a disaster, but according to Chilterns, ‘Sweetheart’ is a “very early Charentais type melon, arguably the variety best suited to our irregular climate, more tolerant of cooler temperatures and quicker to mature”.  We’ll see.

I’ve also planted a few clusters of Basil seedlings along the front edge.IMG_7703

To the left of the door I’ve now planted up a number of pots.  Last year the plants in this area were just in grow bags, but they didn’t seem to do very well, and, as I’d used these pots before and so had them available, I thought I’d go back to them.

In the pots I have Aubergine ‘Kaberi’, Pepper ‘Marconi Rosso’ and Pepper ‘Padron’.

IMG_7702In addition, the OH went to the local boot fair last weekend and bought some more Aubergines, which are now luxuriating in this rather magnificent pot, standing about 80cm tall.  I will of course be furious if his do better than mine!IMG_7704

On the right hand side of the door I have the area with the heated propagation mat, but this has now been turned off.  Here I’ve planted a number of biennials and perennials for next year.  I’m not sure they really want to be inside, but I do find I can keep a much better eye on them here, and so I’ll see how they get on.  I could move them out to the cold frame, but plants there do tend to suffer from a degree of neglect which, if they were children or animals, would get me into serious trouble.IMG_7707

And the final area, also to the right of the door, is my ‘potting’ area.  This is still cluttered with numerous tender plants grown as cuttings and still seeking their place in the world/garden.  Amongst other things, there are some Dahlias (Roxy), Pelargoniums, (including the lovely ‘Sidoides’), and  Sedum (looking much better than the mother plant which has been badly chewed outside)IMG_7708

And, right by the door, one of a pair of Plumbago plants.  I just love this plant and do so hope it will be flowering by the garden opening on the 28th of this month.

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With thanks as ever to Julie for hosting.  Why don’t you go and see what she’s been up to in her TWO greenhouses!

Garden bloggers’ bloom day – October 2014

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So many of the plants flowering now have already been featured in previous GBBD, so I thought I’d start with one that hasn’t.  This is Clematis ‘Freckles’, flowering on the pergola together with Rosa St Swithun.  According to Crocus.co.uk it is ‘often out by Christmas and sometimes by November’.  Clearly mine doesn’t have a calendar to hand.

Other non-annuals flowering now include Aster Frikartii MonchIMG_5114

and Aster September Ruby IMG_5119

I’ve still got plenty of roses flowering, although many have been battered by the recent weather. This one was inherited and is, I think, Rosa Flower Carpet Pink.IMG_5111

These next three were also inherited, so I’m not sure of their names.IMG_5113

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This last one is a bit of a joke as it is clearly very red when the rest of the garden is pink.  It was accidentally chopped right down to the ground by a builder when we were having a porch extension a couple of years ago.  I decided I wasn’t too upset as it didn’t really go with anything, but clearly, to spite me, it’s bounced back and is better than ever.

I can see it from the kitchen and I grudgingly have to admit that while it doesn’t match anything in the garden, it does go nicely with the Aga!IMG_5112

I love the dusky pink colour of this potentilla – I think it’s Potentilla nepalensis,.  I have a number of these plants in the Mediterranean beds and they’re flowering beautifully now, even though the weather could hardly be described as Mediterranean.IMG_5120

These can’t really be described as blooms, but I just love the flower shapes these succulent leaves make.  These are all still in the garden at the moment but expect they’ll all have to be taken inside by next month.

And a last non-annual – this is Pelargonium sidoides.  I just love the dark, rich colour against a silvery leaf and have even started cutting it for flower arrangements as the flower stems seem to get longer and longer as the season progresses.  I really must get round to taking more cuttings.IMG_5118

And to finish, an avalanche of annuals – all I think featured before, but all still flowering their socks off, bless them!

Zinnia, Giant Dahlia Mixed (the first bloom looking rather strangely glossy in the rain)IMG_5121IMG_5123

and Zinnia EnvyIMG_5124

Two Cleomes, C. Cherry Queen and C. Violet Queen.  The colours are more different than the photo would would suggest.

Marigolds – although some have succumbed to powdery mildew, many are still going strong.IMG_5125

 Nasturtium Black Velvet.  These stopped flowering completely after the summer drought, but are flowering beautifully again now – they seem to be relishing this wet weather.IMG_5117

And to finish, my Tithonia rotundiflora ‘Torch’.   I planted around 8-10 plants out back in June, and now have a veritable hedge, 20 ft long and 6 ft high.  Beats Leylandii any day.  IMG_5126

With thanks as ever to Carol at May Dream Gardens for hosting GBBD.

 

Garden bloggers’ bloom day – August 2014

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The garden is continuing to struggle with lack of water – particularly after our two week absence – and consequently I’ve decided to get ‘up close and personal’ for today’s GBBD, and have taken my macro lens on safari.

My first stop was a bed I’ve ‘borrowed’ from a neighbour (no, not the cutting garden, featured in last month’s GBBD, another neighbour) where I’ve planted a lot of orangey annuals – Helianthus Claret, Calendula officinalis Neon, Calendula officinalis Indian Prince and Tihonia rotundiflora ‘Torch’.

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Back in my garden, I also have a couple of orange blooms.  Firstly Abutilon Orange Marion which we bought last year at the end of the summer, from a reduced stand at Wisley.  It was overwintered in the (unheated) greenhouse, and did look very sorry for itself, but was cut back hard and this year has done really well in its position in a pot on the barrow.  During the spring it had lots of little seedlings around the main stem and these have all been potted on.  I’m not entirely sure the garden needs six more orange abutilons, but how could I resist?

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And the second is unnamed as it was a gift, but it has small flowers, as you can see, raised above chive like leaves.  I have a number of these in pots after I divided the original, which are destined for the Med Beds, but like so many things, remain unplanted.IMG_4415

Away from orange, I have a number of (also unnamed) salvias flowering now

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as well as plenty of pelargoniums.  The first is dark. like Lord Bute, but doesn’t have the paler edging.  The second is a lovely dainty scented leaf variety and the third is Pelargonium Sidoides.  I love these flowers too, but I’ve found they are getting a little ‘leggy’ by this time of the year.

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And to finish, I love green flowers, and my Bells of Ireland (Molucella laevis) have been best ever this year.  IMG_4394

Unfortunately, I’m not so convinced about my so called Aster chinensis ‘Hulk.’  I don’t remember Lou Ferrigno bursting out of his shirt and turning pink, but perhaps that’s just me.

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With thanks as ever to Carol at May Dream Gardens for hosting GBBD.