Tag Archives: Nerine bowdenii

Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day – October 2016

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Not many new blooms compared to last month’s GBBD, but I thought I’d share this lovely Abutilon, A. ‘Orange Marion.’

Other Autumn tinted blooms include this Helenium.  I think I’ve previously said it’s ‘Moerheim Beauty’, but I’m starting to think it’s ‘Sahin’s Early Flowerer’ instead.  img_1760

The rest of the garden is still largely pink.  Many Salvias, including ‘Dyson’s Scarlet’, ‘Cerro Potosi’ and ‘Stormy Sunrise.’

Asters are still blooming well, this one, Aster novae-angliae ‘Sptember Ruby’img_1780

and this Aster frikartii ‘Monch’.img_1779

I was delighted to discover during a weekend clear out that I had taken some cuttings last year.  Hurrah!img_1764

Whilst the Pink Flower Carpet roses are still flowering prolifically, img_1751

other roses are more of an individual treat – R. St Swithun,img_1777

R. ‘Jubilee Celebration’img_1791

and this, very precious R. ‘Freeman 1987.’  This isn’t the most robust rose, but very special at it was bought and named for us by our two lovely ‘kids’ in recognition of our silver wedding anniversary in 2012.img_1794

A number of Dahlias are still clinging on, indeed some are returning after a recent drought induced pause, including ‘Hillcrest Royal’img_1792

‘La recoleta’img_1784

And, according to Sarah Raven, these are both ‘Tamburo’, but I feel the second is an imposter!img_1754

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As far as annuals are concerned, sadly the majority have given up the ghost, I think due to drought.  However, this tobacco plant, Nicotiana mutablis is doing a good job of lighting up the back of the Swing Beds.img_1774

I love this shrub, Anisodontea capensis, but it has now got very leggy.  According to the RHS it’s normally grown in a cool greenhouse – thank goodness I hadn’t read that when I planted it!  The RHS also suggests it can be propagated either by seed in spring or semi ripe cuttings in summer.  I think it might be time to make some new babies so that the mother ship can be ‘retired’.img_1790

And to finish, a few Nerine bowdenii.  These were inherited with the house, and always surprise me with their exoticism at such a grey time of the year.

I can’t quite work out whether I want more or not.  What do you think?img_1762

With thanks to Carol at May Dream Gardens who hosts everyone’s GBBDs.

Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day – November 2015

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I took these photos on Saturday as I knew I’d be out all day Sunday, and not only was it pouring with rain but the wind was blowing at around 50mph making it officially a gale.  Consequently some of the photos are rather blurry as, funnily enough, is it was difficult to persuade the blooms stand still.

The number of plants blooming has dropped off dramatically in the last week or so, and the vast majority of my annuals have now flowered themselves to death.  The blooms which are still flowering are overwhelmingly pink, a colour largely inherited when we moved in, but which has been further augmented over time, to the point where this post is rather extraordinarily monochrome.

The Rosa Flower Carpet Pink (top) I’ve mentioned numerous times, but it really is an incredible ‘doer’, (although the buds do get rather battered in the rain).  Here it is joined by the extraordinary Nerine bowdenii – ridiculous flowers for November!

The shrub below, Leptospermum, is planted close to the two blooms above and it too flowers for months.IMG_9515

Another shrub Anisodontea capensis is looking better now than it has all year.  It was planted a few years ago and has definitely taken some time to settle in.  I grew one at a previous property against a south facing wall and to be honest I think it would prefer that kind of protection, but it does get plenty of light and has now grown to the extent that I’m thinking it could do with a spring pruning.IMG_9548

The shrub below offers a more expected bloom at this time of year, Daphne x Pink Fragrance ‘Blapink‘ and has been planted in a pot so that I can move it closer to the house to enjoy the lovely scent.IMG_9526

My last pink shrub is another one having a fabulous late flush.  This is by far my favourite fuschia, F. microphylla.  I love the dainty pink bells which are followed by black berries.IMG_9520

The climber Rhodochiton atrosanguineus still has plenty of blooms, but it has been rather battered by the rain.IMG_9540

Another genus of plants hanging on are my Salvias.  This one, Salvia Dyson’s Scarlet, was new this year and is still absolutely amazing.IMG_9545

Other Salvias still have blooms, but aren’t in the same league.  This one’s Salvia East Friesland

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and Salvia microphylla ‘Cerro Potosi’IMG_9537

And to finish, a rather incongruous shot of the heat and sun loving Zinnias, looking sad and bedraggled in the November rain. IMG_9524

With many thanks to Carol at May Dreams Gardens  for hosting everyone’s GBBD.  Why don’t you pop over and have a look at what everyone else has blooming now?

End of month view – October 2015

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For a moment last weekend I thought the 31st was on Friday, and, as I was headng away for a few days, thought I’d have to take my photos on Sunday.  How different they would have been!  In less than a week the garden has become so much more autumnal.  Not only my Cercis canadensis ‘Forest Pansy’ colouring up in the centre of the photo, but the lawn almost completely obscured by fallen leaves from the over-the-road-oak.

By the Drive Bed, the Cherry’s leaves are now now nearly gone (and those of the Photinia in front were largely sacrificed for the Drive In vases)IMG_9487

In the Bronze Bed the Dahlia Happy Single Date is continuing to flower and the colouring sits well with the now very tawny Hordeum Jubatum.  At the back, the Melianthus Major is providing a rather incongruous, fresh looking contrast.

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Elsewhere the palette is rather less autumnal, with the Grass Beds still showing some colour with Cosmos, Salvia and Asters all clinging on.IMG_9477IMG_9478

In the Mid Century Bed the Salvia Dyson’s Scarlet and Rhodochiton atrosanguineus are the main survivors, with the feathery foliage of the Mimosa, Acacia baileyana pupurea in between the two.

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One definite disappointment in this bed has been the Daucus carota ‘Black Knight’.  Not only has this provided great umbels of white rather than the bruised purple I was expecting, but they’ve completely flopped everywhere too.IMG_9501

On close inspection, I have found some evidence of the colour I was expecting, but you’ll need your glasses…IMG_9503

Most of the roses are now finished, but the odd ones are clinging on, and here they’ve been join by the Nerine bowdenii, bulbs I thought I’d lost earlier in the month.IMG_9481

There are still plenty of pots everywhere, many containing tender plants.  As ever I’m playing Russian Roulette with the weather as I try to eke out the last tomatoes in the greenhouse before I pull them out and fill the space with pots.IMG_9491

The plant on the right below is Daphne x Pink Fragrance ‘Blapink’ my first ever Daphne, which I must move closer to the front door to enjoy it at closer quarters while it’s still flowering.IMG_9493

The Shady Bed, which hasn’t featured for a while, is looking much the same as always.  The Fatsia japonica at the back provides constant structure, and you can see the Hellebore leaves at the front providing promise of flowers in a few months’ time.  There are a few ferns here and some hostas, but I would like to add more.IMG_9488

The recent wet weather has kept the Diving Lady’s pool topped up, but she hasn’t got much to look at except a few straggling raspberries, beans and courgettes.

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I wonder if she saw who nibbled this?IMG_9497

With thanks as ever to Helen at the Patient Gardener for hosting our End of Month Views.

Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day – November 2014

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So it’s November, and whilst the garden isn’t exactly overwhelmed with blooms, there are still many flowers – and some quite exotic.  Firstly this orange abutilon, Abutilon ‘Orange Marion’. This is still sitting on my barrow and has been flowering non stop since June.  It’s in a large pot so will be brought into the greenhouse once frost is threatened, but in the meantime it’s enjoying the sunshine.

There are still roses flowering – Snow Goose,IMG_5385

and two inherited, nameless varieties:IMG_5352

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Another good genus still going strong is Salvia, Salvia microphylla ‘Cerro Potosí’IMG_5376

unknown and IMG_5372

Salvia ‘viridis blue’, flowering in front of the Stipa tenuissima in the grass bed.IMG_5381

Climbers include Honeysuckle and IMG_5387

Clematis ‘Freckles’.IMG_5380

In the ‘med’ beds, this Potentilla nepalensis ‘Shogran’ is still flowering well.  I just love this particular shade of pink.IMG_5392

On the more exotic side, flowers which you think should perhaps know better than to be flowering in November, there is a Grevillea (is it just me or do the buds remind you of a rather pretty  fist?)IMG_5370

Marguerites, still looking cheerful despite the chill, IMG_5369

Nerine bowdenii,

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Zinnia ‘Giant Dahlia Mixed’, in the cutting troughsIMG_5362

and the lovely diascia I was given by Nick Peirce from White Cottage Daylilies, which I wrote about here.  I really must ask Nick what it’s called.IMG_5378

And still the Verbena bonariensis come!IMG_5388

With thanks as ever to Carol at May Dream Gardens for hosting GBBD.