Tag Archives: Nasturtium Caribbean Crush

In a vase on Monday – same but different

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Chuffed with my little glass vase from last week (not least because pickings are somewhat slimmer and shorter at this time of year) I’ve produced a similar arrangement today – even re-using the Phlomis which was still in perfect condition.

The Nasturtium (Caribbean Crush) had self seeded in the Bronze Bed,IMG_3721

whilst the dark Osteospermum ‘Serenity Rose Magic’, is still flowering away in the metal tub. I did take some cuttings a couple of weeks ago but it looks like only one has taken, so I really should try more before it’s too late.  The lighter Osteospermum, seen in the top photo is also from the Bronze Bed, but it’s a bit of a mystery as to how it got there and what it is!

To top it off I added some blooms from an Echeveria.  Can’t say I’ve ever thought to cut them before, but they’re doing fine so far and I think add rather funky ‘spidery’ accents.IMG_3723

All in all, a rather perky arrangement for mid November!IMG_3718

Why don’t you pop over to Cathy’s Blog to see what others have found for their vases on this, the 4 year anniversary?

 

 

 

Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day – July 2016

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Plenty of dahlias this month after my splurge earlier in the year.  Some of these are still in pots, and, not entirely surprisingly, not very happy.  I’m trying to keep on top of feeding and watering, but there’s no doubt they’d be happier with their feet in the ground, if only I could find some ground for them….

The one above is D. ‘Tamburo’, and below, another dark one, D. ‘La Recoleta.’IMG_1291

Bright pink, D. Hillcrest RoyalIMG_1274

and D. ‘Roxy’ are joined byIMG_1273

peachier Dahlia ‘Burlesque’ (with hiding visitor)IMG_1265

and even more orange, D. ‘Zundert Mystery Fox’ IMG_1260

There are still plenty of roses still blooming, including the R. Pink Flower Carpet (which really has been a carpet this year, although looking a little exhausted now),IMG_1245

R. ‘Munstead Wood’,IMG_1292

R. ‘Korizont’IMG_1279

R. ‘Jubilee Celebration’,IMG_1293

and R. ‘Pat Austin’IMG_1254

Plenty of Pelargoniums are looking good, including this one, bought cheaply last year at the local Car Boot Sale, unfortunately without a name,IMG_1289

and this rather more expensive one, P. Choun Cho, which is in a pot with the dahlia in the first photo above, D. Tamburo.IMG_1256

The annuals grown from seed are all a bit behind as I was so late getting everything planted out, but the following are starting to bloom – Antirrhinum majus nanum ‘Black Prince,’IMG_1290

Calendula officinalis ‘Touch Of Red Buff’IMG_1288

self seeded Nasturtium Caribbean Crush (here with Achillea ‘Terracotta’, although not looking very terracotta)

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Cosmos bipinnatus ‘Fizzy White’IMG_1286

and Ammi visnaga ‘Green Mist’IMG_1283

Meanwhile the outdoor sweet peas are romping up the nettingIMG_1276

but the Winter Sun ones are still flowering in the greenhouse (although now rather badly plagued by greenfly).IMG_1270

Also flowering their socks off in the greenhouse are my two pots of Plumbago.IMG_1267

In the Greenhouse beds, the pink of the Potentilla nepalensis ‘Shogran’ shows up well against the wall.  IMG_1263

In these beds too there are both white and blue Agapanthus, grown from seed.IMG_1269

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but there are even more in the strawberry bed.  Although these were planned to all be blue, they too have turned out to be a mix, so I think once they’ve all finished flowering I’ll have a reshuffle!

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In the Mid Century bed one of last year’s Gladioli, G. Black Star, is flowering again – this was also previously discussed here.

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In the Swing Beds, there are plenty of pink blooms – Diascia Personata, grown from cuttings from the original plant generously given by Nick at White Cottage Day Lilies, joined by a Penstemon

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and Salvia jamensis ‘Stormy Sunrise.’

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And to finish a little conundrum.  Below is one of two matching Mandevilla bought at Hampton Court to go in pots on the decking together with the Pelargonium ‘Surcouf’ in place of the rather sickly looking Clematis.  However, despite priding myself on having a pretty good ‘colour’ memory, they aren’t the same pink as the Pelargonium, so now what do I do with them?  Probably plant and be damned, as I don’t know where else they’re going to go!IMG_1271

With thanks to Carol at May Dreams Gardens who hosts everyone’s GBBD.

Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day – June 2016

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I’m a day late for GBBD and have again not touched my garden for over a week due to a trip to Northumberland.  It was planned to coincide with picking up our daughter from uni in Durham, but sadly it also coincided with cold, misty, rainy weather, however I expect I’ll still share some garden visits, even if they’re rather grey!

I took these GBBD photos on my return from London this evening and these too are reflecting the rainy weather.  Bearing in mind my recent multiple absences a degree of skillful camera work was also required to avoid capturing large swathes of convolvulus…..

So, despite the rain, June is all about the roses.  My roses aren’t quite in the same league as the wonderful NT garden at Mottisfont I visited a couple of years ago, but I added some new ones last year, so the number is growing.  The top one, by the front gate, has a lovely scent but was inherited so I’m afraid I don’t know its name.

Below, one of the new roses last year, Jubilee Celebration, already a favourite,IMG_1068

later turns into this.IMG_1062

In the same bed are both Rosa ‘Munstead Wood’ (looking here rather paler than reality)IMG_1069

and climbing Rosa ‘Falstaff’IMG_1077

Another inherited rose in the Lavender bed is a very similar colour toIMG_1065

this Sarah Bernhardt peony.IMG_1067

On the pergola posts either side of the swing are Rosa ‘St Swithun’IMG_1072

and Rosa ‘Korizont.’IMG_1073

In the Bronze Beds the Pat Austin roses which featured in my last Monday vase, have been joined by self seeded Nasturtium ‘Caribbean Crush’IMG_1060

and this poppy, Papaver nudicale ‘Party Fun’IMG_1058

I’m delighted that another poppy, Papaver somniferum ‘Lauren’s Grape,’ has reappeared in the Mid Century bed.IMG_1063

Here too the Lysmachia atropurpurea, grown from seed last year, is filling out

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and has now been joined by a self seeded Malope trifida ‘Vulcan’.  I’ve grown more Malope from seed this year, but they’re all still sitting in a seed tray in the greenhouse.IMG_1079

 

The Alliums in the drive bed, Allium ‘Violet Beauty’, haven’t returned well from their introduction last year, but those that did return are looking good now.  Sadly, I’d added some new tulips, also called ‘Violet Beauty’ to join them, but the tulips came and went weeks ago. Back to the drawing board. IMG_1057

And to finish Meconopsis baileyi, a present from the OH for my birthday.  I wonder if I’ll mange to have it blooming this time next year?

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With thanks to Carol at May Dreams Gardens who hosts everyone’s GBBD.

Yearly round up – 2015

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2015 was the first time I’d planted dozens of tulips directly in the Swing Beds, having previously faffed about planting them in pots and then moving them in and out.  And, in classic gardening happenstance, they didn’t flower as I’d planned at all!  The tulips I’d planted as mids, ‘Pink Impression’ (above) flowered first, and on their own, and then these were followed by (supposedly) April flowering ‘Mistress’ and May flowering ‘Menton’ flowering together (below). The whole show was an absolute joy.

This year I’ve planted more tulips, but in the two new beds, so time will tell as to how perennial these three in the Swing Beds out to be.IMG_7022

As well as the tulips I also planted more Alliums.  I found the new Alliums ‘Violet Beauty’, a little disappointing, but the extra A. Purple Sensation I added, were fabulous as ever.IMG_7231

And the Diving Lady got a new, early bath in the form of Iris reticulata ‘Blue Note’.

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As well as new bulbs, 2016 saw the creation of two new beds, firstly the ‘Mid Century Bed’, below, named after the lovely metal structure the OH bought me for my big birthday.

The theme was supposed to be bruised, purply colours, but, as with the bulbs, there was a welcome ‘mistake’ to enjoy in the form of this Ranunculus, theoretically ‘Purple Heart’, but I rather think not.IMG_7715

I planted some roses for this new bed too, including R. Jubilee Celebration (no, not very bruised either!)IMG_7967

and Rosa ‘Falstaff Climbing’ to grow up the obelisk, but the plant that really stole the climbing show this year was the ‘Rhodochiton atrosanguineus‘.

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The second new bed has a bronze or orangey theme.

 

Many of the plants were grown from seed, including this Nasturtium ‘Caribbean Crush’ and the beautiful grass Hordeum Jubatum.IMG_8240IMG_7930

There was another new rose here too, R. Pat Austin.IMG_8906

And later in the year the ridiculously floriferous Dahlia ‘Happy Singe Date’.  This just went on and on and formed the basis of numerous peachy vases of flowers.

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In June I opened the garden for the third time as part of a village group opening, in aid of the island’s Earl Mountbatten hospice.  I had over 150 visitors and some lovely comments.IMG_7889

Also in 2015 I was lucky enough to visit numerous gardens both on and off the island, including the Sir Harold Hillier garden in February (and again in August)IMG_0411

Arundel Castle in May,IMG_7089

Mottistone Manor in June,IMG_7677

Osborne House in (March and) August

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and Great Dixter IMG_9124

and Bodnant in October.2015-10-29 11.28.44 HDR

As well as my own garden and garden visiting, I dipped in and out of Cathy’s lovely ‘In  a vase on Monday’ meme, including sharing the saga of the wedding flowers 

as well as this group of vases created in October when the OH became captain of his golf club.IMG_9349

And, on the basis that it’s a very rare gardener that ever stops learning, I went on courses at Great Dixter, Common Farm Flowers and West Dean.  And then, to top it all, in September signed up for a Level 3 course in Plants and Planting Design at Capel Manor college, which I’m absolutely loving.  Which reminds me, I really need to get on with my holiday homework!

Wishing you and yours a fabulous, flowery 2016, and thank you so much for supporting Duver Diary with your views, likes and comments.

Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day – August 2015

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Many of my current blooms are annuals grown from seed this year and the one above, Malope trifida Vulcan, has been amazing.  To be honest it probably should have been staked, but I’m quite enjoying the chaos and colour it brings.

Also in the mid century bed is my new dark rose, Munstead Wood still going strong.IMG_8211

In the other new bed, the Bronze Bed, there are Poppies, Papaver nudicale Party Fun.IMG_8242IMG_8239

Nasturtium Caribbean CrushIMG_8245

seen here through a curtain of Hordeum Jubatum.IMG_8240

together with Achillea terracottaIMG_8244

and Scabious Fata Morgana, which as feared, isn’t quite as peachy as I’d hoped, but pretty nonetheless.IMG_8241

In pots I have plenty of pelargoniums including this lovely scented one Pink Capitatum.IMG_8235

And at my cutting garden, I have these magnificent Sunflowers growing from seeds kindly sent to me by Cathy at Rambling in the Garden.  We thought they were Ruby Eclipse, but they’re rather more yellow and enormous!  IMG_8249

As well as these giant sunflowers, I have also grown two smaller varieties, Helianthus cuc Italian WhiteIMG_8251

Helianthus Vanilla IceIMG_8250

Er, spot the difference?

As well, there are plenty of Cosmos Double Click Snow PuffIMG_8255IMG_8253

and Cosmos Double Click CranberriesIMG_8256

The Antirrhinum, A majus Orange Wonder which I was tempted to move back home, of course never got moved, and is having a second flush in the Cutting Garden.

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Another Cutting Garden stalwart is the Salvia horminum ‘Oxford Blue’

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This year I’ve gone a bit mad with Zinnias, planting Zinnia Benary’s Giant Lime, Zinnia Benary’s Giant Scarlet, Zinnia Benary’s Giant Wine, Zinnia Raspberry Cordial and Zinnia elegans Queen Red Lime.  Sadly the Queen Red Lime didn’t germinate  well and those that did ‘damped off’ but the rest are just starting to produce their fabulous bright blooms, on good strong stems, perfect for cutting.IMG_8259

with plenty more to come.IMG_8260

One group of flowers which really hasn’t fared well this year are my sweet peas.  They struggled with the dry weather early on, and have certainly suffered more from greenfly than any year I can remember – perhaps because they were stressed by the early drought.  But I still love them, roll on next year.IMG_8224

With many thanks to Carol at May Dreams Gardens  for hosting everyone’s GBBD.

New beds focus

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Today I thought I’d focus in a bit more detail on the new beds created this year.  I took the view that I didn’t want to spend a fortune on plants (although the roses were clearly an exception!) so I grew a lot of plants from seed.  As a consequence, it has taken a little while for the bed to get going, but you can see from the picture below at the end of March, what can happen in just over a couple of months.

Sadly the whole bed has got rather droughted (especially the hamamelis, H. Aphrodite, which now has very crispy leaves) but I think a couple of good drenchings have saved the position, and things are looking perkier.

The initial planting in the photo above left shows the Calendula ‘Sunset Buff‘ grown from seed last year and the small Libertia peregrinans,  I added some more C Sunset Buff grown this year, but all have suffered with the drought and become rather mildewy.   The photo below shows them at their peak a few weeks ago –  I do like this soft apricot colour.IMG_7711

As well as the calendula, I planted seedlings of Eschscholzia “Cameo Dream”, but these too have struggled with lack of water.  I’ve definitely lost a few and have yet to see any flower, which is a shame, as it’s a lovely, jolly flower I remember fondly from my childhood home, so I’d like to try to establish it here.

More successful has been the Nasturtium Caribbean Crush.  These echo the colour of the Calendula, but are shorter and so have been planted nearer the edges of the bed.IMG_7931

In the photo above you can also see one of the two Rosa Pat Austin I bought for the bed.  I had this as my Wordless Wednesday on June 10th, but that one was actually in Louise’s garden at the Old Rectory.  I guess mine have been a little later to flower as they have been newly planted this year.

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Another plant I bought in was the Achillea Terracotta.  I’ve admired this for a while so it’s been lovely to have a bed where it looks at home.  I’m hoping as the calendula (and maybe nasturtiums) give up, these will keep on flowering.

And lastly in this bed, another plant grown from seed (actually last year, and then never planted out!) the beautiful Hordeum Jubatum.  I do wonder whether it’s a bit odd combining grasses with roses, but I love both.  The grass provides such lovely movement and looks particularly special later in the day.

The photo below shows the view from ‘my’ seat at our out door table.  I’ve struggled a bit with the photo as the new bed looks rather bleached, while the oak bed and the over-the-road-Oak are virtually black.  Whilst it’s not exactly like that in real life, the oak bed certainly recedes into the shadows at this time of year and so doesn’t provide a very entertaining view from the table at exactly the time of year when you might be thinking of eating outside.

Later in the season I have some (sale bargain) dahlias to add, some kniphofia and geum and also Scabiosa atropurpurea Fata Morgana.  The Scabious were from Chilterns and have dainty scabious shaped apricot flowers which I’m excited to see!

Hopefully the bed will continue to evolve and improve over time as I edit the plants and decide what works best.IMG_7933

The other new bed, has also come on dramatically since March:

One of the early highlights, together with the transplanted Cerinthe, was the ‘mistake’ ranunculus, supposed to be dark, but actually bright pink.  They are just about over now, but have been flowering continuously for over two months.

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Seedlings planted here and already flowering  include Stocks ‘Ruby Punch’Malope trifida Vulcan, Moluccella Bells of Ireland,  Dianthus baratus Nigrescens and this lovely poppy, Papaver somniferum ‘Lauren’s Grape’.

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In this bed I’ve planted three different roses, two Rose Munstead Wood, I’m delighted with:IMG_7924

and two Jubilee Celebration I like, but really think are too pale here.  I think I need to ponder on this (and also have somewhere else to put them if I decide they have to move.

The third rose is Falstaff Climbing, which was bought to climb the ‘obelisk’ birthday gift.

IMG_7926The rose has not even flowered yet, and will clearly take some time to make a real impression, so in the interim I bought a Rhodochiton atrosanguineus which is just romping up the support.

As with the Bronze Bed, there are hopefully more delights to come – again some dahlias, and further seedlings yet to flower including Daucus Carota Black Knight.

Whilst I can’t pretend creating these new beds has been cheap, I’ve thoroughly enjoyed trying to minimise the expense by planning and growing a significant amount from seed.  And, as with much gardening, not everything has gone to plan, but we wouldn’t want it all to be too easy now would we?

End of month view – June 2015

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I’m joining Helen at the Patient Gardener to share my June End of Month view.

As some of you know, I opened my garden on Sunday for the local hospice as part of a group opening, and I have to say when I got back from work on Thursday I was devastated to see how exhausted everything looked.  Despite some watering and tidying there were definitely areas that were past their best, but the show must go on and I actually got lots of lovely comments (and over 150 visitors!)IMG_7889

All the photos, apart from the one above, were taken in Monday’s bright sunshine, and I’ve struggled a bit with the light levels.  The one above however, was taken during the opening, and you can see it was a lot greyer.  Luckily (for the visitors, not for the garden!) we missed all the rain bar a few drops.IMG_7907

The Swing Beds were definitely struggling, and even the roses which had looked so lovely the weekend before, were going off a little.  There are Dahlias and Cosmos and Dianthus carthusianorum (grown from seed) amongst other things still to come here, so I hope I can keep it going.

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The Grass Bed has a very limited palette of plants, just the grasses (Stipa tenuissima), looking lovely at this time of year, the self seeded Cerinthe, Allium ‘Hair’ (which has been very badly ‘rusted’ this year), the Verbascum chaixxi Album I grew from seed and the Catananche caerulea, which are new and I just love.  However, around all this is much bare soil, following the disposal of all the dead forget me nots, but I’m not sure what else to add.  I still have various seedlings kicking around, so perhaps I’ll pop some of them in.  IMG_7903

Above is the new Mid Century Bed which is really starting to fill out.  The Ranunculus are still going strong and have now been joined by the first of my new roses to flower, Rosa Munstead Wood, just gorgeous.  I’ve also planted some annuals here including Centaurea cyanus Black Boy, Daucus carota Black Knight, Molucella and Malope.  The Centaurea are just starting to flower, but hopefully the rest will have appeared by next month’s EOMV.

In the other new bed, the Bronze Bed, some combinations have worked, including this one of Calendula Sunset Buff, Achillea Terracotta and Nasturtium Caribbean Crush.IMG_7892

But in common with the Swing Beds, the overall look is a bit exhausted.  However, this picture does show clearly why I wanted the new bed as you can see just how shaded the Oak bed is, in comparison, across the lawn.IMG_7893

In the veg beds, the beans and peas are all rushing up their poles, we’re having the best Raspberry crop ever IMG_7913

and the Diving Lady has again got somewhere to swim

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The raised cutting beds are still looking rather empty apart from plants that overwintered.IMG_7917

But the barrow, which has been a bit of a mess for quite a while, had a good tidy up in honour of the opening, and is looking rather pretty again.IMG_7915

The barrow sits to the right of the greenhouse and this year I’ve added some more orangey plants here too.  Firstly the Antirrhinum Orange Wonder, which I’d originally grown for the Bronze Bed but decided there was more room here

IMG_7919and also the Lathyrus Belinensis, grown in pots either side of the greenhouse door.  These have been really slow to get going but are now starting to look more settled.  They don’t grow as tall as ‘normal’ sweet peas, and nor do they have the same fragrance, but I love their bicoloured flowers and how they work with both the brick and the pot.  I just need them to fill out!

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And to finish, the one bed looking untouched by the recent heat – the Shady Bed looking cool and calm.  IMG_7920

With thanks to Helen for hosting this meme.