Tag Archives: Mottistone Manor

Yearly round up – 2015

IMG_6977

2015 was the first time I’d planted dozens of tulips directly in the Swing Beds, having previously faffed about planting them in pots and then moving them in and out.  And, in classic gardening happenstance, they didn’t flower as I’d planned at all!  The tulips I’d planted as mids, ‘Pink Impression’ (above) flowered first, and on their own, and then these were followed by (supposedly) April flowering ‘Mistress’ and May flowering ‘Menton’ flowering together (below). The whole show was an absolute joy.

This year I’ve planted more tulips, but in the two new beds, so time will tell as to how perennial these three in the Swing Beds out to be.IMG_7022

As well as the tulips I also planted more Alliums.  I found the new Alliums ‘Violet Beauty’, a little disappointing, but the extra A. Purple Sensation I added, were fabulous as ever.IMG_7231

And the Diving Lady got a new, early bath in the form of Iris reticulata ‘Blue Note’.

IMG_6066

As well as new bulbs, 2016 saw the creation of two new beds, firstly the ‘Mid Century Bed’, below, named after the lovely metal structure the OH bought me for my big birthday.

The theme was supposed to be bruised, purply colours, but, as with the bulbs, there was a welcome ‘mistake’ to enjoy in the form of this Ranunculus, theoretically ‘Purple Heart’, but I rather think not.IMG_7715

I planted some roses for this new bed too, including R. Jubilee Celebration (no, not very bruised either!)IMG_7967

and Rosa ‘Falstaff Climbing’ to grow up the obelisk, but the plant that really stole the climbing show this year was the ‘Rhodochiton atrosanguineus‘.

IMG_8048

The second new bed has a bronze or orangey theme.

 

Many of the plants were grown from seed, including this Nasturtium ‘Caribbean Crush’ and the beautiful grass Hordeum Jubatum.IMG_8240IMG_7930

There was another new rose here too, R. Pat Austin.IMG_8906

And later in the year the ridiculously floriferous Dahlia ‘Happy Singe Date’.  This just went on and on and formed the basis of numerous peachy vases of flowers.

IMG_8451

IMG_8909IMG_8828

In June I opened the garden for the third time as part of a village group opening, in aid of the island’s Earl Mountbatten hospice.  I had over 150 visitors and some lovely comments.IMG_7889

Also in 2015 I was lucky enough to visit numerous gardens both on and off the island, including the Sir Harold Hillier garden in February (and again in August)IMG_0411

Arundel Castle in May,IMG_7089

Mottistone Manor in June,IMG_7677

Osborne House in (March and) August

IMG_8157

and Great Dixter IMG_9124

and Bodnant in October.2015-10-29 11.28.44 HDR

As well as my own garden and garden visiting, I dipped in and out of Cathy’s lovely ‘In  a vase on Monday’ meme, including sharing the saga of the wedding flowers 

as well as this group of vases created in October when the OH became captain of his golf club.IMG_9349

And, on the basis that it’s a very rare gardener that ever stops learning, I went on courses at Great Dixter, Common Farm Flowers and West Dean.  And then, to top it all, in September signed up for a Level 3 course in Plants and Planting Design at Capel Manor college, which I’m absolutely loving.  Which reminds me, I really need to get on with my holiday homework!

Wishing you and yours a fabulous, flowery 2016, and thank you so much for supporting Duver Diary with your views, likes and comments.

Mottistone Mother’s Day

2013 05 and prior 055Sunday saw me on a Mother’s Day trip to the National Trust’s Mottistone Manor, towards the eastern end of the Isle of Wight.  The garden is quite small by NT standards, and probably best known for its herbaceous borders much later in the year, but at this time of year there was still plenty to see, not least the stunning naturalised daffodils above and below.

IMG_1472

As well as the bulbs, there were a number of new plants on me – the Fritillaria imperialis (which I know and don’t particulalry like), looked stunning against the Libertia peregrinans ‘Gold Leaf’ which I didn’t.  It was used elsewhere in the garden, and I looked for one for sale but although there were some described as ‘nursery stock’ there were none actually for sale – maybe worth a return visit!

IMG_1447 (2)

New growth was, on occasion, almost extra terrestrial – see the Rheum palmatum ‘Atrosanguineum‘ just breaking through the soil’s surface below.  Amazing to think that by the summer it could be two metres high.

IMG_1432

I also liked the new growth of the Restio Elegia capensis, another new one on me, which is also likely to be around two metres later in the year.  (Entertaining to see the creeping buttercup to the right of the photo, now that is one I do know…)

IMG_1442

The herbaceous border was still (understandably) looking quite bare, but I love the repetition of the Eryngium spires (I think it’s mutabile) with the Euphorbia behind.

IMG_1453

And lastly, not a plant at all, but who can resist an early butterfly?  See below the Polygonia c-album, according to the Butterfly Conservation website a good news story:

“The Comma is a fascinating butterfly. The scalloped edges and cryptic colouring of the wings conceal hibernating adults amongst dead leaves, while the larvae, flecked with brown and white markings, bear close resemblance to bird droppings.

The species has a flexible life cycle, which allows it to capitalize on favourable weather conditions. However, the most remarkable feature of the Comma has been its severe decline in the twentieth century and subsequent comeback. It is now widespread in southern Britain and its range is expanding northwards.”

IMG_1433 (2)