Tag Archives: Leucojum aestivum

In a vase on Monday – all white now

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Happily, not only did I not succumb to the flu, but my three family ‘sicknotes’ are all recovered, hence part of the reason for the title.  The second one is obvious, the blooms are, pretty much, all white.

I have very little white in the garden, not because I don’t like it, but because I don’t like mixing it with other colours (hence my white themed planting in the Grass Bed last summer of just white Cosmos, Malope and Erigeron). 

What prompted today’s vase was the waft of Sarcococca scent I got when taking my ‘End of Month view’ photos earlier today.  The Sarcococca was planted as a tiny specimen and this is the first year it’s been large enough to smell ‘in passing’ (ie rather than grovelling on hands and knees for a sniff!)  Consequently, I thought it would be lovely to cut a couple of stems for the house.

Thinking I’d go with a white theme, I then added some stems of Leucojum (Giant Snowflake),IMG_3880

and some little stems of the evergreen Coleonema ‘Sunset Gold’.   This is now a large plant at the top of the ‘lavender’ steps, bought years ago as a good foliage plant.  The fact that it also produces such exquisite little star shaped blooms at an otherwise bloom-free time of year is a massive bonus.  Like the Sarcococca, I’ve never it picked for a vase before, so I’m not sure how well it will last.

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Lastly I added a couple of stems of Clematis cirrhosa ‘Freckles’.  This is currently providing a veritable curtain across the front of the swing, and although most blooms are either over, or distinctly tatty, a few are still perfect.IMG_3885

The photos were taken with flash (something I usually try to avoid), as the light was so poor by the time I’d come inside.  However, for once, I like the effect as the flash helps to highlight the white against the dark granite surface.IMG_3887

Whilst the vase was put together on Sunday, this morning I’ve really enjoyed having the scent wafting around the kitchen.  In fact, bearing in mind how small the stems are, they pack a wonderful perfumed punch and I can’t believe I didn’t think to cut a little sprig last year.  I’m not sure how long the scent will last, but as I’m leaving for London again early tomorrow, I’m sure it will see me out!

With thanks to Cathy, at Rambling in the Garden who’s sharing a lovely spring display this week and, as usual, hosting all our Monday vases.

End of month view – January 2016

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Finally some sun, hurrah!

Leptospermum, or Tea Tree, above, is (according to Wiki) very rich in Vitamin C and was apparently made into a tea by Captain Cook – probably not personally – to ward off scurvy in his crew, and it is also the plant on which bees forage to produce Manuka honey.  Two valuable traits, doubtless, but I’d settle for just the one – looking this good all the way through January. God knows I haven’t, and nor has the rest of the garden.IMG_9893

Not only are both lawns currently no more than fields as it’s been far too wet to mow, but my dear little Scillas, in the very outside ends of the Swing Beds, are sitting in a proper puddle.IMG_9901

The Swing Beds are both in need of a major cut back and tidy up, but it’s pleasing that there is some structure there.  Looking back at last year’s EoMV I can see how the pink flowered Phlomis Italica, has grown during the past year.  Having been planted at least three years ago they’re starting to get rather leggy and so will need some judicious pruning once we’re further into the year.

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The bed which holds the rhubarb and strawberries had Agapanthus grown from seed planted along the back wall last year.  None has yet flowered but they’ve definitely bulked up, so I live in hope.

Sitting on the edge of the wall in the seed trays are more Agapanthus seedlings (this time from seed collected from the more dwarf A. ‘Tom Thumb’), as well as Carex buchananii, also grown from seed last year for the new Bronze Bed.  I’m not sure whether the Carex will make it into the Bronze Bed, and I have no idea where I’ll put the Agapanthus, but I’m sure they’ll all find homes, even if I give them away!IMG_9900

The Stipa tenuissima in the Grass Bed are continuing to provide interest and you can now see plenty of bulbs pushing up through the forget me nots in front.IMG_9903

And the Mid Century bed, one of last year’s new beds, still has a couple of things to admire, notably the Rhodochiton atrosanguineus growing up the ‘obelisk’ (slightly hard to see in the shade), but also the Acacia baileyana purpurea in the centre.  I’m slightly worried how big this will get, but I’m sure I can prune it back.  (I’m also a little disappointed it’s not more ‘purpurea’ but perhaps it’s the time of year).

The rather scrappy mess in front are two Salvias and some leggy Cerinthe.  

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In the Shady Bed the Sarcococca has finally started to fill out after at least a couple of years.  And I can also see from this picture that I really should cut back the old Hellebore leaves to have any hope of spotting the flowers here.IMG_9906

By the smaller lawn the other new bed, the Bronze Bed, has been largely trimmed back and tidied, but look how much the soil has dropped!  The MC bed is even worse, so I’ll definitely have to top them both up.

The leafless shrub in the middle is Hamamelis ‘Aphrodite’ which I absolutely adored last year.  I’m slightly worried there’s no sign of flowers yet, but I did buy it in bloom in mid February, so perhaps it’s still on schedule.  At the back you can see the Melianthus major still flowering – certainly no normal schedule there.

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On the other side of the lawn away from the house, the shady Oak Bed has more hellebores, as well as inherited Bergenia and Leucojum aestrivum.

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And to finish a couple of early Narcissi  – roll on the rest!IMG_9908

With thanks to Helen at the Patient Gardener who hosts the End of Month meme.  Why don’t you pop over to Helen’s site to see some other EoMVs?

Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day – March 2015

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A late foray into the garden and the combination of low light, macro lens and windy conditions have made for rather fuzzy photos, so apologies!

The view above shows the bed running by the kitchen wondow which contains the pink Rose Flower carpet,  However, as you can see, both the Leucojum aestivum and the Narcissus Tete a tete seem to have proliferated since last year, and the rose is hardly to be seen.  The Phormium to the right of the photo is the one I’d like to get rid of and replace with something for winter interest, but annoyingly, it looks quite good in this grouping.  Hmmm.

After my Lonely and Blue Wordless Wednesday post, I’ve now had many more Irises come into flower in the big copper pot.  What I can’t quite believe is that I planted such a mix.  I haven’t had time to look back at my order, but there appear to be three different blue/purples and a solitary yellow one.  Bizarre.

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The hellebores are now at their best, unlike the photos

and here is a shot of the Hebe I arranged with some of them in Monday’s vase.IMG_6213

There are also a number of Euphorbias in zingy green bloom,

as well as a few Forget me nots just started to flower.  I like this slightly darker one.IMG_6226

The self sown primula I mentioned last month is still flowering wellIMG_6227

and has been joined by a new one I couldn’t resist, for sale at Osborne House,  (post to follow).IMG_6231

And to finish, a little grouping of bulbs by the door, Narcissus Tete a tete, Narcissus Elka and Muscari Armeniacum Big Smile.

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The Narcissus Elka,  (close up below), is the one I’m growing for the wedding.  This is a ‘trial’ pot I left in the cold frame when all its peers got moved to the fridge two weeks ago.  I’m delighted with the colouring and the size and shape of the blooms.

So what of the others?  Well, contra to the majority of advice received, I’ve left them in the fridge!  They were allowed out for good behaviour last Monday, and I think I’ll do the same tomorrow, but they’re looking fine and have definitely been stopped in their tracks by the combination of cold and dark.

The Muscari for the wedding are Muscari Latifolium, not the one above.  You may recall these were looking a little behind and so spent the week before last in the greenhouse.  They put on rapid growth and so were moved out to the garden, but I’m thinking they might need to come back into the greenhouse as, not surprisingly, they’ve slowed right down again.

Thankfully, there aren’t too many pots, and so all this moving around and in and out is more entertaining than challenging.  My fingers are still firmly crossed, but I’m feeling a little more confident than previously.  Watch this space…IMG_6214

With thanks as ever to Carol at May Dreams Gardens who hosts the GBBD.