Tag Archives: Lathyrus Tingitanus

In a vase on Monday – more golf flowers

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Another golfing event – the Captain’s Dinner – led to another request for flowers.  I have to say a couple of weeks ago I was less than enthusiastic as, to my eyes, the garden was full of dying bulb foliage and not much else, but things have definitely moved on, and in the end there was plenty to choose from.

I only needed to prepare eight table decorations, plus one larger one, so the pressure was off compared to the original set of 20 in October .  The first plant I have copious amounts of currently is Cerinthe purpurescens.  This has self seeded everywhere to the extent that cutting for the arrangements was actually beneficial to clear it away from paths and grass.

For the purple arrangements I started with the Cerinthe and added purple sweet peas (still the Winter Sunshine ones from the greenhouse), Erysimum ‘Bowles Mauve’ and a few springs of lavender.IMG_0816

The pink arrangements contained Madame Gregoire Staechelin roses,  Euphorbia, Erysimum, Daucus Carota ‘Black Knight’ and a sweet pea that has self seeded in a large trough containing an Olive tree.  I think this is Lathyrus tingitanus which I grew two years ago in the greenhouse.  Quite how it’s found its way outside I have no idea, but I love the tendrils and its delightful colouring.  Sadly it has no scent.IMG_0817

The white and green contained more Euphorbia, as well as Matthiola incana, white Winter Sunshine Sweet Peas and a couple of Calendula buds.IMG_0818

And the carnival pink and orange pair had more Cerinthe, Geum ‘Totally Tangerine,’ buds of Rosa ‘Pat Austin’ and Pelargonium ‘Surcouf’IMG_0819

As well as the table decorations I threw together a larger arrangement which was designed around anything I could find that had some stem length.  The foliage was bronze fennel and black cow parsley (both of which seemed to be inclined to droop), with Euphorbia, larger heads of Daucus Carota,  Nectoscordum siculum, Allium ‘Purple Sensation’, Sisyrinchium striatum and Rosa ‘Snow Goose’.IMG_0808

With many thanks to Cathy for hosting this lovely meme.  Why don’t you see what others have in their vases this Bank Holiday?  Now I must get in the garden!

Greenhouse Review – mid June 2015

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Like Julie at Peonies and Posies who hosts this meme, things have calmed down in the greenhouse this month.  The vast majority of seedlings have been turfed out to fend for the themselves (and we’ll gloss over the fact that many haven’t actually travelled very far from the greenhouse, are in an unruly array just outside the door…)

At the back of the greenhouse I have sweet peas for the first time.  Firstly Lathyrus tingitanus,

IMG_7705in my view, one of the prettiest flowers, but sadly no scent, so in addition I’ve planted Lathyrus Juliet, which is just starting to flower, and smells gorgeous.  Hopefully I’ll manage to grab the odd moment to sit at the table and enjoy them both.

On either side of the sweet peas are bamboo supports with a variety of tomatoes – this year, ‘Sungold’, ‘Gardener’s Delight’, ‘Black Cherry’, ‘Country Taste’, ‘Ferline’ and ‘Green Zebra’.  All were new to me this year except ‘Sungold’, which is a firm favourite.  And all grown from seed (all seed from Chilterns except ‘Green Zebra’ which was from Sarah Raven).  In addition to the tomatoes I have mini cucumbers ‘La Diva’ as well as Melon ‘Sweetheart’.  I’ve only tried melon once before and it was a disaster, but according to Chilterns, ‘Sweetheart’ is a “very early Charentais type melon, arguably the variety best suited to our irregular climate, more tolerant of cooler temperatures and quicker to mature”.  We’ll see.

I’ve also planted a few clusters of Basil seedlings along the front edge.IMG_7703

To the left of the door I’ve now planted up a number of pots.  Last year the plants in this area were just in grow bags, but they didn’t seem to do very well, and, as I’d used these pots before and so had them available, I thought I’d go back to them.

In the pots I have Aubergine ‘Kaberi’, Pepper ‘Marconi Rosso’ and Pepper ‘Padron’.

IMG_7702In addition, the OH went to the local boot fair last weekend and bought some more Aubergines, which are now luxuriating in this rather magnificent pot, standing about 80cm tall.  I will of course be furious if his do better than mine!IMG_7704

On the right hand side of the door I have the area with the heated propagation mat, but this has now been turned off.  Here I’ve planted a number of biennials and perennials for next year.  I’m not sure they really want to be inside, but I do find I can keep a much better eye on them here, and so I’ll see how they get on.  I could move them out to the cold frame, but plants there do tend to suffer from a degree of neglect which, if they were children or animals, would get me into serious trouble.IMG_7707

And the final area, also to the right of the door, is my ‘potting’ area.  This is still cluttered with numerous tender plants grown as cuttings and still seeking their place in the world/garden.  Amongst other things, there are some Dahlias (Roxy), Pelargoniums, (including the lovely ‘Sidoides’), and  Sedum (looking much better than the mother plant which has been badly chewed outside)IMG_7708

And, right by the door, one of a pair of Plumbago plants.  I just love this plant and do so hope it will be flowering by the garden opening on the 28th of this month.

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With thanks as ever to Julie for hosting.  Why don’t you go and see what she’s been up to in her TWO greenhouses!

Greenhouse Review – mid May 2015

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I was standing in the greenhouse on Sunday and, looking around, I said to my husband, ‘I think things have got a little out of hand’.

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There is no doubt that my seed growing and cutting taking activities have reached almost epidemic proportions and I can’t seem to stop.  However, these photos do show the ‘before’ positionIMG_7258

I’m delighted to report that since these photos were taken I have moved numerous seed trays outside and the greenhouse is looking a little less crammed.

I still haven’t moved all the tender plants outside, which I’m sure is over cautious, but I’ve yet to plan all my pots and so it’s not clear where they should go anyway. IMG_7259

And there are so many more than last year because of, yes, all those cuttings.IMG_7265

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Last month I was fretting about planting out my sweet peas because I needed the pots to plant my peas and beans, well as you can see, the root trainers still haven’t been evacuated, and so the beans have had to find alternative lodgings.IMG_7263

One place (of three so far) where I have planted out sweet peas is on one of the willow supports in the greenhouse.  The support sits just behind the small table and chairs and I’m hoping when I sit at the table, which I often do to write plant labels (of which there are very many) I’ll be able to enjoy both the blooms and the scent.  I’ve never grown sweet peas in the greenhouse before and I’m intrigued to know how strong the scent will be.  One of the sweet peas I’ve chosen isn’t actually scented (Lathyrus tingitanus) but the other one, Lathyrus Juliet, is, so here’s hoping she can do the job on her own!

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Other plants growing away strongly are my dahlias.  These ones, Bishop of Canterbury, were stored as tubers last year as they had been grown in pots that I wanted to plant up for spring.

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And guess what?  I’ve recently taken a few cuttings of both these and Dahlia Roxy, the other dahlia I had from last year.  There really is no hope for me!

Perhaps by next month the greenhouse will seed tray free, but I somehow doubt it – what about the biennials?

With many thanks to Julie and her beautiful, organised greenhouse at Peonies and Posies for hosting this Greenhouse meme.

Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day – May

IMG_2303 (2)Eleagnus ‘Quicksilver‘ with (I think) Green Orb-Weaver spider.  I had never noticed the flowers before, so thank you GBBD for making me look!

Last month I said was all about the tulips, and whilst every other tulip is long gone, my gorgeous Angeliques are still flowering, so I think they deserve a final curtain call.

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Also in pots (as well as those on the barrow) I’ve got lots of pelargoniums and maguerites.

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I’ve also taken a couple of photos of flowers on the succulents,

but the big news has to be the number of roses coming into bloom.  These three were inherited, so I’m afraid I don’t know the names,

but these were all planted by me in the last three or four years, and they’re finally starting to look properly established – Madame Gregoire Staechelin

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Rosa Korizont

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and Rosa St Swithun

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This Veronica prostrata is another plant that looks much more settled than it did last year.IMG_2311

I love the colour of this Potentilla, I think it’s Potentilla nepalensis ‘ShogranIMG_2262

The Cerinthes are just getting better and better, here with Erysmum ‘Winter Orchid’IMG_2294

However, I’m not entirely sure about this Clematis, Josephine, I think she may be a little too showy for my likingIMG_2278

On a rather more subdued note, a dark Aquilegia with Nectoscordum siculum.  I’m not convinced about the Nectoscordum either, but for the opposite reason – I’m not sure it’s showy enough – but it’s so perennial I don’t have the heart to rip it out.IMG_2327

I certainly wouldn’t want to be without my Allium Purple SensationsIMG_2307 (2)

But to finish, my first sweet pea – the Tangier Pea, Lathyrus tingitanus.  which I wrote about in January.  How the year’s flying by…

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With thanks again to Carol at May Dream Gardens for hosting GBBD.