Tag Archives: Hornbeam

Just pleachy #3

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Only very long standing readers will have seen this picture of the hornbeams we planted in a neighbour’s garden in February 2014 (posts here and here).  Unfortunately, in the intervening two years they have had no further attention.

This morning, with the sun shining and the realisation that they were definitely overdue a visit, they looked like this.  Not only seriously shaggy, but also, in many cases, no longer attached to their frames.IMG_0278

I set to with my secateurs at the left hand end, cutting back to the eight horizontal branches coming from each trunk.  And at the same time, the OH started at the right hand end, attempting to fix the frames in situ.  Not an easy task.

After an hour and a half (and a sleet storm) I could no longer feel my fingers and  I’d snipped as much as I could.   I had also run out of the brilliant rubber covered metal ties I was using, as well as any more frames robust enough to attach my newly streamlined branches to, so I left the OH fiddling with wire and bamboo and went in for lunch.

I’m slightly concerned that the ‘after’ photo below is looking rather a lot like the before one at the the top, but as the OH commented, ‘we’re talking a ten year project.’

I’ll keep you posted.IMG_0279

 

 

End of month view – September 2014

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The trouble with going somewhere as amazing as West Dean (see my last post) is that your own garden can’t help but suffer by comparison.  But, having said that, it’s always good to see fabulous gardens as they hopefully inspire us to do better.

Like West Dean, I do have some Asters, including this inherited one which is very tall and has flopped badly, but still makes a wonderful showIMG_5050

but this one, Aster Frikartii Monch, in the left hand Swing Bed, is much better.  It’s still a little floppy, but a better colour and a much bigger flower.  I love the way it goes with the Verbena bonariensis.  (I think the colour is a better match in real life than in the photo).IMG_5046

In the right hand Swing Bed, you can see the matching Aster as well as the out of control Rosa Snow Goose.  I think a ladder and a pair of gaunlets is called for.IMG_5048

On the posts either side of the swing the rose Rosa St Swithun is having a lovely second flush.  I really need to tie these branches in too, but think I’ll leave it until they’ve finished flowering now.

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The Grass Bed is looking a little better now that the Nasturtiums have recovered from the drought.  I like the colour combination of the orange of both the Nasturtium and the Fox and Cubs with the purple Salvia, but this bed still desperately needs a good sort out.

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In the veg patch, likewise, the runner and french beans have all recovered from the drought and are cropping well.  However the Pumpkin Munchkins have finished and need to be brought in.  Some of the courgettes are still going strong, but nearly all have succumbed to mildew.IMG_5045

By the conservatory the (inherited) Nerines are coming into flower.  They always strike me as a rather incongruous plant for this time of year, but at least they add some colour.IMG_5038

In the greenhouse, as well as lots of tomatoes (yum),IMG_5060

and Cucamelons (not so yum!)IMG_5056

I’ve finally got peppers, both the long pointy red ones (well they will be one day)

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as well as some rather sweet little orange onesIMG_5059

Many pots are still going strong, but most won’t survive the winter and so will have to be moved into the greenhouse – never a trivial task!IMG_5040

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And to finish, a quick catch up of my ‘borrowed’ garden.  The Tithonia and Sunflowers featured last month continue to bloom their golden socks offIMG_5071

but the real development is a bed I created underneath the hornbeams we pleached earlier in the year (see part 1 and Part 2).  The hornbeams need a bit of a hair cut now, but have taken really well and I’m looking forward to seeing the blossom in the spring.

Again, like the Tithonia and Sunflowers, all the flowers here are annuals, but this time on a pink theme including Cleomes and Cosmos as well as the greens of Molucella and Amaranthus.  It really is amazing what you can achieve in one season with a few hands full of annual seeds!IMG_5066

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With many thanks, as ever, to Helen at the Patient Gardener,  for hosting everyone’s End of Month views.

Just pleachy!

2014 02 014 Before we get on to the ‘pleachy’ aspect of this post I just had to share this picture of a gorgeous hellebore (as well as my gorgeous thumb).  Of course hellebores are shy and retiring and like to keep their faces downcast and demure which, when they’re as lovely as this one, is just so frustrating (hence the thumb).  And yet, in the same way that I really don’t like the idea of pink delphiniums, I think perhaps a ‘look you in the eye’ hellebore would lose some of its magic.  Surely at this time of year we’re resigned to having to work at finding things worth looking at in the garden – even if it does mean getting down on our hands and knees in the bog that used to be the lawn.

So, back to the title.  Today was rather unusual as, in addition to plants, it also involved two men and a digger – not my usual gardening style.  The day was spent outside in the bluster (but luckily not the rain) planting trees in a neighbour’s garden.  The idea was to plant a row of hornbeams to pleach into a screen.  Of course there are some wonderful ready pleached trees, but these will cost you at least £500 each.  Instead we were dealing with some trees which cost £30, but clearly there would be more effort involved.

Firstly we had to decide on the approach for the structure to both train and support them.  We wanted something sufficiently sturdy, but not so obtrusive it detracted from the trees, we wanted something which could be removed once the trees are established, so no concrete, and we didn’t want to use wire as I’d read it can cut into the branches you’re trying to train.

I think it’s fair to say there were some robust ‘discussions’ going on over the weekend as to the best approach.  And nothing had been decided by the time I had to drop my son at a paintballing event on Sunday.  Now this may seem irrelevant, but in a serendipitous way, it turned out to provide the solution, as there, at the paintballing site, were some lovely hazel rods for sale.  I picked up three bundles for £5, perfect.

So, together with the posts, the rods and the bamboo, we had our kit:

Whilst Nimbus and I were working on the structure to train the trees against, A and Andy the digger man were busy banging in the posts:

Having erected the posts, next we planted the trees.  We decided it would be easier to plant them without any other structure in place and then, once the trees were in place we would attach the bamboo and hazel frames to the posts and then train the trees onto the frames.  We used the digger to dig a long trench and then positioned the trees and backfilled with some sandier, lighter soil.  We didn’t add manure to the planting area as I’d heard that if you make the immediate planting area too rich the tree doesn’t bother to push its  roots out to the surrounding soil.  We gave them all a good soak, despite the forecast rain, and tomorrow we’ll top dress the whole trench with manure.

So, below you can see the trees in position.  Since then we’ve also put one frame in place and tomorrow we should finish the job.  I’ve already started pruning away the branches growing either in the ‘wrong’ direction, or below the level we want the screen to start, and tomorrow will start to train the remaining branches onto the four bamboo ‘layers’.

It’s not exactly instant but I’m excited to see the finished effect tomorrow – and even more excited to see the hornbeams greening up in the spring.

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