Tag Archives: grevillea

Garden Bloggers Bloom Day – March 2016

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I’m starting with this lovely group of Fritellaria meleagris which I have to confess I bought in a pot from Waitrose.  The ones I’d planted in the shady lawn a couple of year ago seem to have dwindled to nothing, and I was feeling their loss.  I can’t quite decide whether I’ll plant these out after flowering or if it’s all rather a lost cause.  I do so love them.

Elsewhere other bulbs are coming up well.  The number of Narcissi has increased since last month – as well as N. ‘Tete a tete’ there are a couple of inherited onesIMG_0076

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more of the new Narcissus ‘Cragford’, which have been blooming well for a month,

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and, oh look, my first N. Jenny!IMG_0054

I went a bit mad with the Crocus ‘Cream Beauty’ this year after they were all eaten last year, and I’ve now got plenty in various pots, having kept them safe in the greenhouse during their infancy.

One advantage of a failing memory is that I can’t remember which Narcissus I planted to follow on –  I could look it up, but think I’ll just wait and see!IMG_0277

My two Hamamelis, ‘Aphrodite’ andIMG_0059

‘Arnold’s Promise’ are still blooming with their beautiful orange and lemon zesty flowers.IMG_0058

The Hellebores have gone from strength to strength with all the clumps significantly bigger than a year ago.IMG_0057

There are a few blooms flowering out of season – this Grevillea, which I’ve recently uncovered under a huge Fuchsia I just pruned,IMG_0075

an Argyranthemum,IMG_0074

this little DianthusIMG_0065

Cerinthe major pupurescensIMG_0066

and a couple of Pelargoniums which somehow never got brought in over the winter.  Luckily I seem to have got away with it!

This is a plant I don’t think I’ve ever featured as I havent known it’s name.  For the majority of the time it looks like a low growing conifer, but at this time of year it’s smothered in these tiny white/pink flowers and is absolutely stunning.  I finally discovered its identity at the recent RHS show, it’s a Coleonema, I think Coleonema ‘Sunset Gold,’ and it’s an absolute belter.IMG_0078

Another favourite, the Leptospermum (or tea tree plant) still covered in blooms.IMG_0050

And to finish, something I really wish wasn’t here – one of a number of clumps of wild garlic, or ransoms, Allium ursinum.  I’d better get weeding.IMG_0073

With thanks as ever to Carol at May Dreams Gardens who hosts the GBBD.

Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day

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Pretty slim pickings for GBBD today, but I love the optimism of this perky geranium.

I shared my favourite hellebore last Wednesday, but I’m delighted to have more to show.  Like Julie at Peonies and Posies, my hellebores are bulking up, but there’s definitely room for more!

This Cornus Mas featured on another Wordless Wednesday is still flowering well and, growing in a pot by the front steps, it makes a very cheery greeting.IMG_9835

This Abutilon ‘Orange Marion’ is also in a pot outside, which is starting to feel rather risky bearing in mind how the temparature’s dropped.IMG_9845

The Grevillea‘s also outside and still looking good.IMG_9856

Not blooms, but they were once!  These are the lovely, fluffy seed heads of Clematis ‘Freckles’. Perhaps I should try planting some.IMG_9854

Talking of seeds, whilst the Rhodochiton atrosanguineus is still flowering, there are also some stems which have now turned to seed heads.

I am already growing some (bought) Rhodochiton seeds which I planted late last summer,IMG_9866

but if anyone fancies trying this lovely plant themselves please drop me an email at jenhumm116@yahoo.co.uk with your address and I’ll send you some of the seed heads through the post.  I clearly can’t guarantee success but Chloris assures me they’re easy!

With many thanks to Carol at May Dreams Gardens  for hosting everyone’s GBBD.  Why don’t you pop over and have a look at what everyone else has blooming now?

 

 

Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day – February 2015

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As in January, a strange mix of spring bulbs and rather more exotic plants are blooming.  The Grevillea above has a number of genus companions, including this one.IMG_6026

These are both outside, the first in the ground and the other in a pot that’s too heavy and too far from warmth to move.  Bearing in mind they’re (largely) Australian, do you think they’re following the seasons down under?

As well as the Iris reticulata ‘Gordon‘ featured last month, IMG_5985

this has now been joined by Iris reticulata ‘Blue Note’, providing an early pool for the Lady Diver. Although why on earth she’d want to be swimming outside this early in the year I have no idea.IMG_6020

I’m very excited to report that since last month, my Hamamelis count has increased to three. The one below is the one I think is ‘Arnold’s Promise’.IMG_6000

This has been joined by a very small  H. Jelena featured in last week’s Wordless WednesdayIMG_6012

and, as of yesterday’s visit to the Hillier Gardens, a rather more magnificent H. Aphrodite.  I’m very chuffed that Aphrodite was my Valentine treat from the OH!IMG_5987

There are more Hellebores blooming, although they’re still not good at lifting their heads.  I seem to recall last year the first ones below, in particular, became more erect as the month went on.IMG_5994IMG_5998IMG_6008

As far as bulbs are concerned, I actually have more of these (inherited) Leucojum than Snowdrops. IMG_6016

as well as many little Muscari Armeniacum ‘Big Smile‘, planted in pots.IMG_6015

My only real ‘winter interest’ shrub is the Sarcococca confusa.  Sadly this is tucked away in the shady bed, thus breaking all the rules about keeping it near the door so you can enjoy the perfume.

I have been considering digging out a large Phormium (which is near the door) and replacing it with something new for winter interest, but I just can’t decide what would be best.  I’m vacillating between Daphne/Lonicera/Viburnum.  Any thoughts?IMG_6006

One of my favourite plants flowering at the moment is this little primrose.  It is self seeded on the steps which run between the two Lavender Beds.  It’s a lovely colour, rather more ‘dusky’ than this picture would suggest.  I would love more of it, but I’m terrified to try to dig it up to divide it in case I just rip the plant from the roots (it’s growing in a very small crack).  And I’ve never seen any likely looking seeds.IMG_6004

And, in case you’re missing the sun, (as I said last month), I give you the following.

Not quite as sunny as last month’s Abutilon ‘Orange Marion‘, but this one is the better named –Viola ‘Sunny Side Up’,IMG_5982

With thanks as ever to Carol at May Dreams Gardens who hosts the GBBD.

Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day – January 2015

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So, a funny GBBD – I seem to have a mix of ‘expected’ early spring flowers, like the Iris Gordon, above and belowIMG_5756

together with some tender, hot climate flowers that you think would know better.  For example Melianthus major has just decided to have a second flush of flowers right now:

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But to continue with ‘expected’ flowers, I have a only a few hellebores so far –

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Correa backhouseana,IMG_5775

the odd Clematis Freckles, IMG_5788

and my one paltry Witch Hazel, Hamamelis, (could be Arnold’s Promise, but now starting to doubt it after Chloris said it was the last to flower…)IMG_5770

Less expected at this time of year are succulent flowers.  These are in the (unheated) conservatory.  Two SempervivumsIMG_5749

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and an Aeonium.IMG_5751

Meanwhile, outside, Anisodontea capensisIMG_5796

two Grevillea,IMG_5792

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my incredibly long flowering LeptospermumIMG_5757

and my stalwart Fuschia microphylla.IMG_5779a

And in the greenhouse, in case you’re missing the sun, I’ll finish with Abutilon Orange Marion.IMG_5777

With thanks to Carol at May Dreams Gardens who hosts the GBBD.

 

Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day – November 2014

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So it’s November, and whilst the garden isn’t exactly overwhelmed with blooms, there are still many flowers – and some quite exotic.  Firstly this orange abutilon, Abutilon ‘Orange Marion’. This is still sitting on my barrow and has been flowering non stop since June.  It’s in a large pot so will be brought into the greenhouse once frost is threatened, but in the meantime it’s enjoying the sunshine.

There are still roses flowering – Snow Goose,IMG_5385

and two inherited, nameless varieties:IMG_5352

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Another good genus still going strong is Salvia, Salvia microphylla ‘Cerro Potosí’IMG_5376

unknown and IMG_5372

Salvia ‘viridis blue’, flowering in front of the Stipa tenuissima in the grass bed.IMG_5381

Climbers include Honeysuckle and IMG_5387

Clematis ‘Freckles’.IMG_5380

In the ‘med’ beds, this Potentilla nepalensis ‘Shogran’ is still flowering well.  I just love this particular shade of pink.IMG_5392

On the more exotic side, flowers which you think should perhaps know better than to be flowering in November, there is a Grevillea (is it just me or do the buds remind you of a rather pretty  fist?)IMG_5370

Marguerites, still looking cheerful despite the chill, IMG_5369

Nerine bowdenii,

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Zinnia ‘Giant Dahlia Mixed’, in the cutting troughsIMG_5362

and the lovely diascia I was given by Nick Peirce from White Cottage Daylilies, which I wrote about here.  I really must ask Nick what it’s called.IMG_5378

And still the Verbena bonariensis come!IMG_5388

With thanks as ever to Carol at May Dream Gardens for hosting GBBD.

March’s barrow

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To be honest the barrow hasn’t moved on much from February.

The fuschia (amazingly) continues to flower, but I’ve also added my Grevillea to the mix, as well as the Carex ‘Everillo’ to pick up on the yellow of the Tete a tete.  Lastly I popped a pot of tulips, which were flowering in the greenhouse, on top of the Cineraria.