Tag Archives: Fatsia japonica

End of Month View – February 2017

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The Shady Bed is looking good despite the gloom.  Here is probably the largest clump of Hellebores and they’re joined by the sweetly scented Sarcococca and the constant Fatsia japonica.

Elsewhere, the main view is very gloomy (not helped by timing my photos an hour before some watery sunshine emerged).img_2116

In the troughs there are plenty of shoots, but as yet no colour.  Did I mention that I’d replaced the old Stocks at the back with new cuttings?  And whilst they don’t seem to be making much progress, the self seeded Cerinthe in the path in front is romping away…img_2120

The Swing Beds are still looking quite full but hardly flowery.  Many herbaceous plants still need a cut back, as do the roses, which are looking extremely wild and woolly.img_2121

The two Clematis cirrhosa ‘Freckles’ are still blooming well on the pergola, but definitely rather tatty on close inspection.  And I fear pruning the Rosa St Swithun growing amongst them is going to be a little challenging!

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More bulbous shoots in the Grass Bed, but as yet no blooms here either.img_2124

I’ve pruned all the roses in the Mid Century bed, but still haven’t attacked the Salvias.  In the foreground you can see some overwintered Antirrhinum which look closer to flowering than some of the bulbs!

The soil level has fallen in this bed again this year

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so lucky I’m prepared!

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On the other side of the garden in the Oak Bed the Hamamelis (H. Arnold’s Promise) is glowing against the wall.  It probably deserves rescuing from all that dead foliage!img_2133

In the Bronze Bed the Narcissi ‘Cragford’ are the furthest advanced of all my daffodils and will soon be ready to ‘pop’.

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Also ready to pop any minute, my other Hamamelis, H. Aphrobite.  Just a couple of blooms so far, but much promise and such a lovely colour.img_2135

In the greenhouse, the Winter Sunshine Sweet Peas have now been planted out,img_2128

there are seeds stirring in the damp darkness (I hope)img_2129

and on the windowsill a few perky Muscari latifolium, returned again from the Wedding Flowers of two years ago.  Step niece Hannah (whose wedding it was) is now proud mum to Hamish so, looking at the colour, I should probably have sent them over!)img_2126

And to finish, you can’t beat a jolly pot of ‘Tete a Tete’.img_2137

With thanks to Helen at the Patient Gardener for hosting everyone’s EoMV.

End of Month View – January 2017

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A grey old day for January’s EoMV, which is a shame, as Saturday was beautiful – but then I was far too busy digging to take photos!

Over the last two weekends I’ve finally got out in the garden after an absence of at least a month.  However, in many ways, the work has seen me going backwards to go forwards.  The final bulbs, Allium sphaerocephalon were bought for the two Lavender Beds, but as both were full of Convolvulus, Couch Grass and generally past-their-best plants, a big dig was called for before I could plant them.  Happily the digging was dug and, although you can’t see them, the bulbs are in.img_2042

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The good news is that there are now large new areas of bed to ‘play’ in, but that requires thought and planning, both of which take time, so no firm plans as yet.

One thing I have mentioned before is the desire to move the Acacia baileyana purpurea from the Mid Century bed and I’d like its new location to be in the left hand Lavender Bed, in the centre of this photo (in front of the Choisya, which I think I’ll remove).

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The problem is, when to do the deed?  Now would seem a sensible time to move many plants, but the Acacia is on the cusp of bursting into bloom for the first time, so now doesn’t seem exactly conducive.  Thoughts?img_2052

Further round the garden, more bare earth tells of more activity – I finally pulled the old, very leggy Matthiola incana (Stocks) out of the troughs and replaced them with these cuttings taken from the ‘mother’.  These have been in pots for a while, so I’m not sure how long they’ll take to find their feet.  They look pretty pathetic at the moment!img_2045

The two Swing Beds are still quite green but everything needs a good cut back and tidy up. I’ve read it’s better to wait to do this until the temperature picks up as the old growth protects the newer shoots, particularly on tender plants such as Salvias and Penstemons.  Well, that’s my excuse.img_2048

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In the Grass Bed, more bare earth after a big clear out last year.  This is a bit of a shame as I’ve previously had masses of Forget me knots here and I’ll miss them.  img_2050

I’m trying to move various clumps in from other areas where they’re not wanted, but I still don’t think I’ll achieve the lovely froth of last year:IMG_0293

I had a tidy up of the Herb Bed yesterday and whilst most are looking understandably tired, the Sorrel is looking fresher and more productive than ever.  Any recipe suggestions?img_2054

The Shady Bed is exhibiting a good showing of glossy foliage.  I’ve never noticed before how the Fatsia japonica leaves echo the Hellebores.  To the left of the Hellebores the Sarcococca is flowering, picking up the white of the Hellebore to the right.  Shame the fern in the middle is so chewed!img_2058

At the Western end of the garden, in the shady Oak Bed there is the merest hint of bloom in the Witch Hazel (Hamamelis ‘Arnold’s Promise’), and some more Hellebores,img_2062

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whereas at the end of the Bronze Bed a far more exotic scene of flowering Aeoniums in front of luxuriant Melianthus major foliage.

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Meanwhile in the greenhouse, plenty of bulbs in pots to look forward toimg_2055

and this.  Finally, an empty bulb box!img_2056

And to finish, my Rosemarinus prostratus.  I mentioned in GBBD how it wasn’t very ‘prostratus’, time to eat my words!img_2067

With thanks to Helen at the Patient Gardener who hosts EoMV.

End of month view – October 2015

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For a moment last weekend I thought the 31st was on Friday, and, as I was headng away for a few days, thought I’d have to take my photos on Sunday.  How different they would have been!  In less than a week the garden has become so much more autumnal.  Not only my Cercis canadensis ‘Forest Pansy’ colouring up in the centre of the photo, but the lawn almost completely obscured by fallen leaves from the over-the-road-oak.

By the Drive Bed, the Cherry’s leaves are now now nearly gone (and those of the Photinia in front were largely sacrificed for the Drive In vases)IMG_9487

In the Bronze Bed the Dahlia Happy Single Date is continuing to flower and the colouring sits well with the now very tawny Hordeum Jubatum.  At the back, the Melianthus Major is providing a rather incongruous, fresh looking contrast.

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Elsewhere the palette is rather less autumnal, with the Grass Beds still showing some colour with Cosmos, Salvia and Asters all clinging on.IMG_9477IMG_9478

In the Mid Century Bed the Salvia Dyson’s Scarlet and Rhodochiton atrosanguineus are the main survivors, with the feathery foliage of the Mimosa, Acacia baileyana pupurea in between the two.

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One definite disappointment in this bed has been the Daucus carota ‘Black Knight’.  Not only has this provided great umbels of white rather than the bruised purple I was expecting, but they’ve completely flopped everywhere too.IMG_9501

On close inspection, I have found some evidence of the colour I was expecting, but you’ll need your glasses…IMG_9503

Most of the roses are now finished, but the odd ones are clinging on, and here they’ve been join by the Nerine bowdenii, bulbs I thought I’d lost earlier in the month.IMG_9481

There are still plenty of pots everywhere, many containing tender plants.  As ever I’m playing Russian Roulette with the weather as I try to eke out the last tomatoes in the greenhouse before I pull them out and fill the space with pots.IMG_9491

The plant on the right below is Daphne x Pink Fragrance ‘Blapink’ my first ever Daphne, which I must move closer to the front door to enjoy it at closer quarters while it’s still flowering.IMG_9493

The Shady Bed, which hasn’t featured for a while, is looking much the same as always.  The Fatsia japonica at the back provides constant structure, and you can see the Hellebore leaves at the front providing promise of flowers in a few months’ time.  There are a few ferns here and some hostas, but I would like to add more.IMG_9488

The recent wet weather has kept the Diving Lady’s pool topped up, but she hasn’t got much to look at except a few straggling raspberries, beans and courgettes.

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I wonder if she saw who nibbled this?IMG_9497

With thanks as ever to Helen at the Patient Gardener for hosting our End of Month Views.

End of month view – October 2014

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I’m joining Helen at The Patient Gardener’s end of month meme a day late, apologies!

The picture above shows the lovely Cercis canadensis ‘Forest Pansy’ peeking over the willow fence and matching beautifully with the self sown vine.  The picture was taken earlier in the week and sadly, already the cercis leaves are starting to fall.

Elsewhere in the garden there are still vestiges of summer to admire with the St Swithun Rose (yes I know it should have been tied up) arching over the swing in the sunshineIMG_5262

and succulents still flowering outside.IMG_5248

The Swing Beds are still showing some colour with penstemons, salvias and asters, but there’s a lot of chaos (certainly the climbing roses) and I still need to dig up the sisyrinchiums which are taking over the front of both beds.  I think I should also look at dividing some of the perennials, particularly the geraniums.IMG_5253

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The shady bed continues to look good despite no flowers.  I love the structure the caster oil plant, Fatsia japonica provides at the back of this bed.IMG_5276

In the veg patch there isn’t much to see apart from Chard (below) and a number of collapsed structures which need to be taken down.IMG_5256

With regard to fruit, there is still a small crop of autumn raspberries, as you might expect, IMG_5258

but I certainly wasn’t expecting this!  Strawberries in November – the world’s gone mad!IMG_5255

In the greenhouse I haven’t yet cropped my Mini Belle Yellow peppers.  To be honest now I’ve grown them, I’m not quite sure what to do with them.  Somehow I don’t have much need for raw peppers to add to a picnic for snacking any more….IMG_5277

Also in the greenhouse, over the last few weeks I’ve done something I haven’t done before, which is to let my Sungold Tomatoes do their own thing, unrestricted .  Having carefully pinched out the side shoots on all my tomatoes up until the end of September, I read/heard somewhere that Sungold can continue cropping until December under glass, and so, whilst all the other tomatoes will very shortly be pulled up, I’m just letting the Sungolds do what they want and then I’ll see whether I can harvest any more.

Of course one of the problems with this is that the plants are now right up to the top of the greenhouse and impossible to reach without a chair or ladder, but as they are my favourite tomato to eat raw, I feel a little mountaineering will be worth it.IMG_5278

I’ve also been busy taking cuttings of lavenders and pelagoniums.  I went to a talk at our local horticultural society recently and the speaker, one of the lecturers at the Isle of Wight college, said he always takes cutting into seed trays, and crams in 20!  I’ve always tended to put 4 or 5 around the edge of a terracotta pot, but I thought I’d try his method (although I drew the line at 12) and see how I get on.IMG_5279

Over in the ‘borrowed’ garden, the OH has been busy strimming all the brambles on the far side of the wall so that we can now see the recently arrived sheep.  There are still annuals flowering in the bed in front of the wall – Cosmos, Cleomes and Amaranthus – but the Ammi have pretty much given up.

A little later in the year, when the hawthorn trees are dormant, I’ll need to prune them into shape and tie in the required new growth.  Overall I’ve been delighted with how well they settled in since planting them at the beginning of February.

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And the Tithonia ‘hedge’ I mentioned in my GBBD post is also still going strong, although not quite as strongly as a couple of weeks ago.

Cathy at Rambling in the Garden queried my measurements but I don’t think I was far out. There are 11 plants and the bed must be nearly 20ft long and some of the plants are definitely taller than me (alright, not many!) and I’m 5ft 7.  Believe me now?

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