Tag Archives: Clematis cirrhosa ‘Freckles’

End of month view – November 2018

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Another late, ‘warts and all’ EoMV of a garden largely untouched (and largely unchanged) from a month ago.

I definitely feel I’m losing the plot – and probably not just gardening wise.  Luckily, in the shot above, the freshly mown lawn suggests a better cared for garden than is currently the case!

Luckily also, the mild weather here means I haven’t yet had any real frosts and Pelargoniums such as this ‘Choun Cho’ continue to flower.IMG_4593

The vine, which was rather brutally detached from the decking when it was replaced earlier in the year, has been reattached and is surprisingly putting on some attractive fresh growth.

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Whilst the Veg Bed has still not been cleared (and there are plenty of nutty ‘Pink Fir Apple’ potatoes still to dig) I did have a massive cut back of all the bay shoots around the Diving Lady so she can be see out again.IMG_4595

Either side of the swing the two Swing Beds are now almost completely devoid of colour, with just a handful of Salvia blooms remaining,IMG_4596

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but in the middle, draped across the swing arch, the Clematis cirrhosa ‘Freckles’ is looking like a pretty but very overgrown fringe.IMG_4598

The Grass Bed has been mostly cleared of dying Zinnias but this has again exposed all the missing Stipa Tenuissima plants which used to line the back of this bed and were sadly lost last winter.

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The Mid Century bed still has the odd rose flowering and another Salvia, but little else except a random Nicotiana (middle front) which has popped up unexpectedly.IMG_4601

Below you can see that the Silk Tree – Albizia julibrissin ‘Ombrella’ is looking a little peaky.  I’m hoping she perks up and next year provides rather more than the solitary bloom she provided this summerIMG_4592

Round to the western end of the garden takes us past the last of the flower carpet roses and the inherited Nerines.

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At this side of the garden I’ve finally cleared the decaying Dahlias but the bed is still clogged with leaves from the ‘over-the-road-oak’.

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In the shrub planted Oak Bed I stumbled across these Hamamelis buds.  I think it’s ‘Arnold’s Promise’, but don’t think I’ve ever seen him this early before.IMG_4616

Looking much better than either of the beds is the oft-featured tray of succulents.  I wonder when I’m going to need to get them under cover?IMG_4614

Finally, into a very untidy greenhouse.  A bit of a hack through the tomatoes ended up with these as collateral damage.IMG_4602

As last year, in the late part of the growing season we’ve had a bad infestation of whitefly in the greenhouse so (unbeknown to me) having seen them advertised online, the OH ordered some biological pest control and these cards arrived and were hung up while I was away in the week.  I’ve just taken a moment to look the product up and I think it’s possible the parasitic wasps which are supposed to target the whitefly won’t hatch unless it’s an average of 17 degrees and sadly there’s not much chance of that now!IMG_4605

On a more positive note I did finally get around to taking some Salvia and Pelargonium cuttings,

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so hopefully I’ll have more plants like this, S. ‘Love and Wishes’ (3rd place in the RHS ‘Plant of the Year’ in 2015) to play with next year!IMG_4607

With thanks to Helen at the Patient Gardener for hosting EoMVs.

End of Month View – October 2018

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Firstly, apologies for the numerous dodgy photos – I’m not quite sure what the excuse is – and the lateness!

So, the good news is the work crisis, which has been hanging over me since July, has passed and we live to fight another day.  Hurrah!

The bad news is, as you’ll see, I still haven’t managed a proper garden tidy up.  (AND I let the OH go away on a golfing holiday, so no grass cutting either!)

However, bearing in mind I missed last month’s EoMV as we were away, I thought I’d post anyway, warts and all.

The usual quick twirl takes us past the decaying Veg Patch (note the Diving Lady is completely lost behind the rampant Bay growth.  They’ll all have to be cut back – anyone want any bay leaves?)

The veg are pretty much all over for the year, apart from plenty of tasty, nutty flavoured Pink Fir Apple potatoes still in the ground waiting to be dug up.

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The roses in the Swing Beds seem to have finally finished flowering, so it’s pretty much just the Salvias and Verbena left now.

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This is a particularly atrocious photo, but I love the heavy fringe of Clematis cirrhosa ‘Freckles’.IMG_4572

I’m delighted to see a couple of the lovely Icelandic poppies in this pot are still surviving.  They really were one of my favourite things this year.IMG_4577

The greenhouse beds, which were looking quite coordinated earlier in the year with blue Asters and Agapanthus, have now been overwhelmed by rampant Nasturtiums.  IMG_4567

On the other side there’s a chaos of pots, many of which were moved from the decking when it was rebuilt.  Most need to be moved back (although some are tender and need to be moved into the greenhouse), but before I do that I must get them some little ‘feet’ to raise them up.IMG_4568

In the meantime, the new decking is looking clean and clear.  Doubtless not for long!IMG_4569

The Mid Century bed still has a few roses clinging on, as well as a matching SalviaIMG_4579

There are a few fresh looking Nerines just coming out.  These were inherited when we bought the house and I’m always struck by how incongruous they look at this time of year.

I’m not sure I like them, but frankly, with so little else going on, I really shouldn’t complain!IMG_4582

I love this brave looking bloom on the (unknown) rose by the front steps.  Clearly it didn’t get the memo from the surrounding hips that it’s supposed to be over and done with!IMG_4583

At the western end of the garden the Bronze Bed is a mess of mildewy dahlias.  Nearly all my Dahlias struggled with the lack of water this year, but these ones seemed to give up particularly early.IMG_4585

One of the better beds at the moment is the Oak Bed which still has the autumnal leaves of the Cercis canadensis ‘Forest Pansy,’ as well as a good display of other shrubs.IMG_4587

And to finish, the old tin bath (which has currently been moved as a section of wall is being repainted).  The Pelargonium is ‘Choun Cho’ bought at vast expense last year from Crocus, but I took cuttings at the end of the year and now have loads of really vigorous plants that have largely pushed everything else out!  However, I really love the colour and shape, so I’m not complaining.  What I must do is watch the weather as I wouldn’t want to lose them!IMG_4584

With thanks to Helen at the Patient Gardener for hosting our End of Month Views – whether on time or not!

In a vase on Monday – all white now

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Happily, not only did I not succumb to the flu, but my three family ‘sicknotes’ are all recovered, hence part of the reason for the title.  The second one is obvious, the blooms are, pretty much, all white.

I have very little white in the garden, not because I don’t like it, but because I don’t like mixing it with other colours (hence my white themed planting in the Grass Bed last summer of just white Cosmos, Malope and Erigeron). 

What prompted today’s vase was the waft of Sarcococca scent I got when taking my ‘End of Month view’ photos earlier today.  The Sarcococca was planted as a tiny specimen and this is the first year it’s been large enough to smell ‘in passing’ (ie rather than grovelling on hands and knees for a sniff!)  Consequently, I thought it would be lovely to cut a couple of stems for the house.

Thinking I’d go with a white theme, I then added some stems of Leucojum (Giant Snowflake),IMG_3880

and some little stems of the evergreen Coleonema ‘Sunset Gold’.   This is now a large plant at the top of the ‘lavender’ steps, bought years ago as a good foliage plant.  The fact that it also produces such exquisite little star shaped blooms at an otherwise bloom-free time of year is a massive bonus.  Like the Sarcococca, I’ve never it picked for a vase before, so I’m not sure how well it will last.

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Lastly I added a couple of stems of Clematis cirrhosa ‘Freckles’.  This is currently providing a veritable curtain across the front of the swing, and although most blooms are either over, or distinctly tatty, a few are still perfect.IMG_3885

The photos were taken with flash (something I usually try to avoid), as the light was so poor by the time I’d come inside.  However, for once, I like the effect as the flash helps to highlight the white against the dark granite surface.IMG_3887

Whilst the vase was put together on Sunday, this morning I’ve really enjoyed having the scent wafting around the kitchen.  In fact, bearing in mind how small the stems are, they pack a wonderful perfumed punch and I can’t believe I didn’t think to cut a little sprig last year.  I’m not sure how long the scent will last, but as I’m leaving for London again early tomorrow, I’m sure it will see me out!

With thanks to Cathy, at Rambling in the Garden who’s sharing a lovely spring display this week and, as usual, hosting all our Monday vases.

End of month view – October 2017

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Today’s ‘End of Month View’ features photos actually taken on Friday as it was such a beautiful day I was compelled to capture it.

This first view is over the statuesque Ricinus communis ‘Carmencita’ to Bembridge harbour beyond.  Amazing to think that, as a half hardy annual, the Ricinus was just a seed eight months ago!IMG_3637

Walking across the decking there are still blooms on the Pelargonium ‘Surcouf’

as well as in various other pots.

Round to the Strawberry Bed you can see the Agapanthus are rather taking over.  I have now chopped back the seed heads, but I fear the strawberries are being squeezed out.

The  Swing Beds still have a bit of colour, largely from the Salvias, but also the Verbena bonariensis and a few asters and rosesIMG_3651

The pergola is luxuriantly draped in Clematis cirrhosa ‘Freckles’, but surely the amazing thing about this shot is the colour of the sky!IMG_3653

This Grass Bed photo is one of total chaos, and is in fact is no longer representative as I spent Saturday afternoon pulling out all the spent annuals and rediscovering the Stipa tenuissima at the back, which give the bed its name.  Dozens and dozens of Nasturtium seeds fell onto the bed as I was clearing, so next year they’ll be back with a similar vengeance unless I’m very determined.

I finally got my bulb order in last weekend and this bed is destined to be one of the beneficiaries. Last year the vast majority of bulbs planted here were eaten by some critter or other, so I’m hoping next year will be more successful.

In the left hand Lavender Bed I’m delighted that my little silk tree Albizia julibrissin ‘Ombrella’ is doing well –

it’s already come a long way from this twig (see to the left of this photo from April).  I wonder if next year it will flower?IMG_2355

Walking round the house to the western end of the garden takes you first past the Flower Carpet roses, looking ridiculously perky,

and then the old tin bath, also full of summery Gazanias and Osteospermums.

Once round the corner things take a definitely autumnal turn, 

but you’ve got to love that Cercis – talk about bonfire night!

Back round to the greenhouse, and you have to admire the continuing blooms of the greenhouse pots.  These have been blooming non stop since June and have been an absolute joy. 

The greenhouse, however, has not been such a joy.  It’s latterly suffered an infestation of whitefly, so I’ve hoiked nearly everything out, discarding all the tomatoes and cucumbers

and leaving pretty much everything else outside like a mad ‘bring and buy’ plant sale.

Fingers crossed the whitefly expire before the temperature drops – and anyone with any whitefly tips, please do share!  

With thanks to Steve, at Glebe House Garden, who now hosts End of Month views.

End of month view – September 2017

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The best bit about this view is the newly mown, stripy lawn – thanks hubs!

Taking the usual End of Month tour takes us firstly past the metal troughs which have been taken over by two enormous, self seeded Shoo-fly plants (Nicandra physalodes).  I confessed last month that the Cosmos and trailing Sweet peas planted in the troughs this year were unhappy with such hot roots, so I’ve let the Shoo-flies take over.

The plan for next year is an abundance of Pelargoniums – reckon they’ll be happier?IMG_3322

Talking of unhappy, the Veg Patch is a little sorry now too.  Not only have the cutting flowers largely given upIMG_3325

but the Diving Lady’s pool has dried up, and the beans have fallen over.IMG_3327

And those of a sensitive disposition look away now – I seem to be feeding the Island’s Cabbage White caterpillar population with my ‘Flower Sprouts.’

The Flower Sprouts are a cross between kale and Brussel sprouts, which supposedly grow ‘baby’ kales (kalettes), at the leaf axils (where you’d ordinarily find the Brussels).  I’ve been trying to convince myself that I don’t need the leaves as they’re not the crop, but I guess without the leaves there is no ‘engine’ to grow the ‘kalettes’.  Hmmm.IMG_3324

On a cheerier note the Swing Beds are still colourful, with even a Lupin in bloom.IMG_3330

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On the Swing Pergola itself there is a veil of flowering Clematis cirrhosa ‘Freckles.’IMG_3336

Whilst up close they’re very pretty, from a distance I have to admit they’re rather a mess!IMG_3334

Interestingly, the Cosmos in the Grass Bed which got damaged in earlier windy weather, has now all but disappeared, with the white Malopes and self seeded Nasturtiums taking over.  IMG_3338

In the Mid Century Bed the Ricinus communis ‘Carmencita’ has been hauled back upright having flopped right over the path, and is still providing fabulous foliage to accompanyIMG_3319

the remaining blooms, particularly the Dahlia ‘La Recoleta’ and the roses.

I’m also delighted that the Cercis canadensis ‘Forest Pansy’ (planted in April) has survived despite my rather haphazard attentions over the summer and is now looking settled.

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The Silk Tree (Albizia julibrissin f rosea), planted at the same time as the Cercis, is also fine, but looking a little overwhelmed by the Asters in the photo below!

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In the Greenhouse beds, my clearing of the Nasturtiums last month (in an effort to expose some soil for the poppies to self seed) didn’t exactly go to plan.  Instead, the Nasturtiums are back in force and sadly, there’s no sign of any poppy seedlings.IMG_3342

In the Greenhouse Pots, a Sarah Raven combo has been flowering for months – Arctotis ‘Flame’ and Thunbergia ‘African Sunset.’

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Whilst in the greenhouse, most things are coming to an end,IMG_3343

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the cuttings are just beginning.IMG_3344

One thing I’m hoping to grow more of is this Pelargonium ‘Choun Cho.’IMG_3345

Along by the house, the Flower Carpet roses are back with a vengeance and smothered in buds.

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Buds too on the Nerines.IMG_3351

Round the corner the inherited roses by the gate are reflecting the (definitely inherited!) pampas.

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In the tin bath at the top of the steps, the Osteospermum ‘Serenity Rose Magic’ (also from Sarah Raven) have survived best of everything in here.  I took plenty of cuttings at the weekend so hopefully I’ll have more next year.IMG_3353

The Bronze Bed is still doing well – the ‘Happy Single Dates’ are only looking a little thin because I’d picked loads for a big vase.

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And to finish, better late than never.  My neighbour gave me seedlings of Morning Glory ahead of June’s garden opening, but sadly I didn’t get them planted out until quite some time later.  But look, they’re flowering now – thanks Rosy!

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With thanks too to Steve, at Glebe House Garden, who has taken over hosting End of Month views.

End of Month View – February 2017

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The Shady Bed is looking good despite the gloom.  Here is probably the largest clump of Hellebores and they’re joined by the sweetly scented Sarcococca and the constant Fatsia japonica.

Elsewhere, the main view is very gloomy (not helped by timing my photos an hour before some watery sunshine emerged).img_2116

In the troughs there are plenty of shoots, but as yet no colour.  Did I mention that I’d replaced the old Stocks at the back with new cuttings?  And whilst they don’t seem to be making much progress, the self seeded Cerinthe in the path in front is romping away…img_2120

The Swing Beds are still looking quite full but hardly flowery.  Many herbaceous plants still need a cut back, as do the roses, which are looking extremely wild and woolly.img_2121

The two Clematis cirrhosa ‘Freckles’ are still blooming well on the pergola, but definitely rather tatty on close inspection.  And I fear pruning the Rosa St Swithun growing amongst them is going to be a little challenging!

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More bulbous shoots in the Grass Bed, but as yet no blooms here either.img_2124

I’ve pruned all the roses in the Mid Century bed, but still haven’t attacked the Salvias.  In the foreground you can see some overwintered Antirrhinum which look closer to flowering than some of the bulbs!

The soil level has fallen in this bed again this year

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so lucky I’m prepared!

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On the other side of the garden in the Oak Bed the Hamamelis (H. Arnold’s Promise) is glowing against the wall.  It probably deserves rescuing from all that dead foliage!img_2133

In the Bronze Bed the Narcissi ‘Cragford’ are the furthest advanced of all my daffodils and will soon be ready to ‘pop’.

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Also ready to pop any minute, my other Hamamelis, H. Aphrobite.  Just a couple of blooms so far, but much promise and such a lovely colour.img_2135

In the greenhouse, the Winter Sunshine Sweet Peas have now been planted out,img_2128

there are seeds stirring in the damp darkness (I hope)img_2129

and on the windowsill a few perky Muscari latifolium, returned again from the Wedding Flowers of two years ago.  Step niece Hannah (whose wedding it was) is now proud mum to Hamish so, looking at the colour, I should probably have sent them over!)img_2126

And to finish, you can’t beat a jolly pot of ‘Tete a Tete’.img_2137

With thanks to Helen at the Patient Gardener for hosting everyone’s EoMV.

Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day – February 2017

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One solitary Tete a tete Narcissus to herald this February’s GBBD!

With the photos taken in Sunday’s gloom, it was a joy to find more yellow elsewhere from Cornus mas,img_2076

rather tatty looking Erysimum ‘Ivory Giant’img_2088

Hamamelis ‘Arnold’s Promise’img_2085

and the rather acid yellow of an Aeonium flower head.  (This latter one in the greenhouse!)

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Less yellow and more green, the emerging flower spikes of Euphorbia characias Wulfenii. The joke is that this burgeoning clump is self seeded, whereas the plant I bought and positioned carefully closer to the swing, is a complete wimp in comparison.img_2096

The following pair were featured ages ago in a Wordless Wednesday called ‘Blues Brothers’ – they are both members of the family Lamiaceae, and both flowering now Rosmarinus prostratus and Teucrium fruticans,

The pergola is still smothered in Clematis cirrhosa ‘Freckles’ but I have to admit that the recent wind and cold has made the majority of them look rather chewed.  I had to work hard to find this one!img_2098

I don’t have much white in the garden as I find it hard to mix successfully with other colours, but at this time of year there are a few exceptions – beautifully scented Sarcococca confusa,img_2093

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and this pot of Crocus – Crocus chrysanthus Miss Vain.  These have been growing in the greenhouse so now they’re out in the open I hope they don’t get eaten.  Wouldn’t be the first time.  Grrr.img_2100

And to finish, a lovely clutch of Hellebores.

With thanks to Carol at May Dream Gardens who hosts everyone’s GBBDs.  Why don’t you pop over and see what others have blooming now?

Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day – January 2017

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Amazingly, despite the recent freezing weather, I still have a number of the annual Nicotiana mutablis flowering in the Swing Beds (the one above caught up in the bare branches of the Elaeagnus).

The overall look of the garden is very wintery, but close inspection revealed a number of further blooms, including roses Rosa ‘Flower Carpet Pink’img_2002

and neighbouring Rosa ‘Berkshire.  Note the matching pink stripe on the Phormium – I can’t take credit, both were inherited!img_2003

There are still a couple of Gazanias clearly confused what month it isimg_2009

and likewise this Pelargonium ‘Surcouf.’img_2019

In addition to Erysimum Bowles Mauve I currently have this pair in flower.  The first one E. ‘Red Jep’ was bought last year after I’d admired it so much when I visited Hyde Hall.  The second rather yellow one was grown from seed, and I think is E. Ivory Giant.

By the front steps the Rosmarinus prostratus is covered in blooms, but is hardly looking very ‘prostratus’.

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And whilst I’m chuffed to see Rosemary’s Babies are also flowering, I’m not entirely sure what I’m going to do with them…..img_2012

This Teucrium fruticans plant is really very woody but seems to have responded quite well to a severe hack back last year.img_2036

Similarly this Anisodontea capensis is also past its best, with the stem currently tied to a post to prevent it falling over.  It’s a beautiful shrub when happy in the sun, but mine’s definitely showing its age (I know the feeling).img_2033

There’s nothing in the Veg Patch for the Diving Lady to admire except some rather scruffy kale, so I’m glad she’s still got a pretty pool.

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In the Mid Century bed the Acacia baileyana purpurea looks like it’s going to flower for the first time.  It’s a lovely little tree with gorgeous foliage, but I really don’t think it’s in the right place and will have to go.  But where to move it?img_2032

In the greenhouse there are a few plants flowering – this Abutilon ‘Orange Marion’img_2015

and a couple more Pelargoniums.

I also discovered this beautiful Iris histioides ‘Lady Beatrix Stanley,’ which would definitely be brought into a more prominent positionimg_2017

if only she had some friends!img_2018

Back outside the sun continues to bring out the Freckles

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and I’m waiting with bated breath to see when it will do the same for these:img_2007

With thanks to Carol at May Dream Gardens who hosts everyone’s GBBDs.