Tag Archives: Calendula Sunset Buff

End of month view – July 2016

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Another set of rather bleached photos as these were taken around midday when I found a minute spare.

After the big clear out in June, the grass bed was planted with Ammi, Cosmos and Calendula and all are starting to fill out.  I hadn’t really thought through how tawny the grasses would get, and the colouring is working well with the marigolds.  I’m hoping by the time they’re exhausted the Ammi and Cosmos will be in full swing and I can just turf them out.

Meanwhile the Swing Beds are rather overrun with Diascia personata but are at least looking more flowery than they were this time last year, but that won’t last long if I don’t get some water on them.

I’m trying to add more blues to these beds with some Scabious grown from seed (Scabiosa atropurpurea ‘Blue Cockade’) as well as the sister’s Penstemon (P. Stapleford Gem mentioned here) but they’re still not really making any impact.  And although I have chopped back the pink hardy geranium at the front, there’s still too much of it, and it does leave a large uninteresting green patch when it’s stopped flowering.IMG_1403

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In the Mid Century bed the Rhodochiton which were such a success on the obelisk last year, still haven’t got going and a couple have definitely perished.  I do have some spares so need to get those planted before it’s all too late.  I’ve pulled out all the poppies now but they have been replaced by the rather gaudy Gladioli Black Star (discussed here).  Annuals here of Antirrhinum and Malope are still just getting going.

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In the Veg Bed the most striking thing is the Sweet Peas.  I’ve actually planted two rows this year, there’s another wave coming behind, opposite the runner beans.  As for actual veg the courgettes are (predictably) taking over, and there’s plenty of chard.  The French Beans, Runners and Mange Tout have all been a little slow to get going, and they too would benefit from a really good soaking.IMG_1398

Highlight of this area for me has to be the home grown Agapanthus.  As I’d hoped, they’re obviously loving the heat of the wall at the back of the strawberry bed.

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At the other side of the garden in the Bronze Bed the Dahlia ‘Happy Single Dates’ are going from strength to strength and proving how much happier Dahlias are with their feet in the ground.  The number I’ve still got in pots are clearly feeling (and looking) rather disgruntled.IMG_1380

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In the greenhouse the tomatoes and cucumbers are hurtling up the bamboos, but haven’t been too productive to date – more water (and food) required, I feel.

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The aubergines have their first flowers.  Quite how Monty Don was harvesting fully grown aubergines weeks ago I have no idea!IMG_1391

Non edibles include my lovely Plumbagos as well as this glory lily (Gloriosa rothschildiana).IMG_1396

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And there are new biennial seeds coming to start the whole cycle again.IMG_1394

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And to finish, a few pots currently looking good.  IMG_1407

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With thanks to Helen at the Patient Gardener who hosts the EoM meme.

End of month view – June 2015

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I’m joining Helen at the Patient Gardener to share my June End of Month view.

As some of you know, I opened my garden on Sunday for the local hospice as part of a group opening, and I have to say when I got back from work on Thursday I was devastated to see how exhausted everything looked.  Despite some watering and tidying there were definitely areas that were past their best, but the show must go on and I actually got lots of lovely comments (and over 150 visitors!)IMG_7889

All the photos, apart from the one above, were taken in Monday’s bright sunshine, and I’ve struggled a bit with the light levels.  The one above however, was taken during the opening, and you can see it was a lot greyer.  Luckily (for the visitors, not for the garden!) we missed all the rain bar a few drops.IMG_7907

The Swing Beds were definitely struggling, and even the roses which had looked so lovely the weekend before, were going off a little.  There are Dahlias and Cosmos and Dianthus carthusianorum (grown from seed) amongst other things still to come here, so I hope I can keep it going.

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The Grass Bed has a very limited palette of plants, just the grasses (Stipa tenuissima), looking lovely at this time of year, the self seeded Cerinthe, Allium ‘Hair’ (which has been very badly ‘rusted’ this year), the Verbascum chaixxi Album I grew from seed and the Catananche caerulea, which are new and I just love.  However, around all this is much bare soil, following the disposal of all the dead forget me nots, but I’m not sure what else to add.  I still have various seedlings kicking around, so perhaps I’ll pop some of them in.  IMG_7903

Above is the new Mid Century Bed which is really starting to fill out.  The Ranunculus are still going strong and have now been joined by the first of my new roses to flower, Rosa Munstead Wood, just gorgeous.  I’ve also planted some annuals here including Centaurea cyanus Black Boy, Daucus carota Black Knight, Molucella and Malope.  The Centaurea are just starting to flower, but hopefully the rest will have appeared by next month’s EOMV.

In the other new bed, the Bronze Bed, some combinations have worked, including this one of Calendula Sunset Buff, Achillea Terracotta and Nasturtium Caribbean Crush.IMG_7892

But in common with the Swing Beds, the overall look is a bit exhausted.  However, this picture does show clearly why I wanted the new bed as you can see just how shaded the Oak bed is, in comparison, across the lawn.IMG_7893

In the veg beds, the beans and peas are all rushing up their poles, we’re having the best Raspberry crop ever IMG_7913

and the Diving Lady has again got somewhere to swim

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The raised cutting beds are still looking rather empty apart from plants that overwintered.IMG_7917

But the barrow, which has been a bit of a mess for quite a while, had a good tidy up in honour of the opening, and is looking rather pretty again.IMG_7915

The barrow sits to the right of the greenhouse and this year I’ve added some more orangey plants here too.  Firstly the Antirrhinum Orange Wonder, which I’d originally grown for the Bronze Bed but decided there was more room here

IMG_7919and also the Lathyrus Belinensis, grown in pots either side of the greenhouse door.  These have been really slow to get going but are now starting to look more settled.  They don’t grow as tall as ‘normal’ sweet peas, and nor do they have the same fragrance, but I love their bicoloured flowers and how they work with both the brick and the pot.  I just need them to fill out!

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And to finish, the one bed looking untouched by the recent heat – the Shady Bed looking cool and calm.  IMG_7920

With thanks to Helen for hosting this meme.

End of month view – May 2015

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Sadly the Swing Beds are currently having rather a lull after the gorgeous bulbs in evidence last month.  Whilst in April and early May they were bright with a succession of tulips, now, whilst the roses are starting and there is a vast amount to come, the main blooms are the rather quiet, understated Nectoscordum.

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I moaned about them last year, so I really think they’ve had their day and I should replace them with something jollier and more visible from a distance.  Shame Alliums don’t come in the shocking pink of the Pink Impression Tulips!

The right hand swing bed is showing a little more colour with the geraniums, Cerinthe and self seeded foxglove.IMG_7611

And it is lovely that the roses are finally making a real impression on the pergola (four years after planting).

You can also see the netting erected for the sweet peas.  They’re currently being a little shy and seem currently to have been rather stopped in their tracks by the shock of being moved out into the ground.IMG_7609

The Grass Beds, to the right of the Swing Beds, still have their rather exhausted forget me nots, and I really need to clear these to make way for some annual planting to take their place.  Last year I planted some seed grown perennial Verbascum chaixii album in this bed and they’ve come back better than ever.  Problem is, I’m not sure I really want them there…IMG_7612

The troughs are resplendent with last autumn’s planting of Allium Purple Sensation.  They’re growing amongst the gloriously scented stocks, Matthiola incana, but sadly are also accompanied by a rather tatty array of decaying daffodil foliage.  Last year I had the bright idea that I should turn the troughs around to hide the dying foliage at the back.  This would have been an absolutely brilliant solution if only we could have lifted the troughs!   Hopefully the foliage has now done its job, so shortly I should be clearing it to add some annuals for the summer.

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The Lavender Beds are rather dominated by the Erysimum Bowles Mauve, but hey, there are worse things…IMG_7597

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One bed I rarely show is the drive bed.  I planted new alliums here this year too, this time Allium Violet Beauty, which are slightly larger and paler than A. Purple Sensation.  Also, I moved numerous Sisyrinchiums here as they were threatening to take over the Swing Beds.  I was inspired by this vase, as I thought the Sisyrinchiums would echo the colour of the Rose, R. Snow Goose.  The Sisyrinchiums aren’t quite in flower, but I live in hope that the composition will work and be enhanced by the Alliums.  We’ll see (in a week or two…).

As for the self seeded Gladiolus byzantinus, well, I think I’ll leave them be for the minute.  But, ooh, light bulb moment, is this what I should be adding to jolly up the Swing Beds?IMG_7591

On the other side of the drive, the Cytisus is looking spectacular and the colour is now picking up on the buds and flowers of the inherited rose.

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Progress on the new beds is still reasonably slow.  The Mid Century bed has precisely two blooms, both Ranunculus I planted as bulbs.  They’re not exactly as ‘bruised’ as the planned colour scheme, but they’re the first I’ve ever grown, and I love them.IMG_7613

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Just as a little aside, in 2012 I visited the Flower Farm at Carlsbad, California, and the Ranunculus there were absolutely unbelievable – see photo from their website below.

I’d love to start a Ranunculus farm here, but really not sure the island can quite match the Californian climate…

Anyway, back to home.  The new Bronze Bed isn’t displaying anything in the way of blooms other than the Calendula Sunset Buff, sown last year.  Like the Swing Beds, there’s plenty to come, but I am starting to worry that the Hamamelis, now in leaf in the centre of this bed, is taking up too much room.  Hmmm.IMG_7592

On the far side of the lawn from the new Bronze Bed above, you can see how the over-the-road-Oak’s shadow almost completely covers the Oak Bed.  I really need to try to add some more interest here, but the lure of planning and planting the new Bronze Bed  – in almost full sun – is of course far greater.IMG_7594

Another shady area is this bed, running along the north side of the porch.  This has been completely given over to hostas, which are now bulking out nicely after three years.

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Meanwhile, in the veg bed, the canes are up and the first wave of peas and beans are in.IMG_7606

And to finish, a view of the utter chaos in front of the greenhouse.  These are just some of the seed trays, turfed out of the greenhouse and hardening off all over the gravel.

And no, I don’t know where they’re all going to go.  So don’t ask!IMG_7617

With many thanks to Helen at the Patient Gardener for hosting everyone’s End of Month Views.

Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day – May 2015

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Whilst there are a few tulips still clinging on, the majority of bulbs flowering now are Alliums. Above, Allium Purple Sensation, matching beautifully with the stalwart Erysimum Bowles Mauve behind. Funny, I don’t remember that combination last year, and yet they were both there!

In the Swing Beds, Nectoscordum siculum (not a true Allium, but in the family), are just starting to bloom.  Last weekend my daughter, old enough to know better, took great delight in peeling back some of the papery sheaths to help them on their way.  I think she missed this one.IMG_7237

In the Drive Bed, Allium Violet Beauty, planted new for this year.IMG_7223

Sharing the Drive Bed with the Alliums are these Erysimum Ivory GiantIMG_7210

and growing on the fence above, Rosa Snow Goose, in bud and fully open.IMG_7227IMG_7228

In the new Bronze Bed the Calendula I grew from seed last year, Calendula Sunset Buff, are one of the first things to flower.  I love the soft apricot colouring.IMG_7211

Annoyingly, not all of the seeds I planted seem to be Sunset Buff.  These two, whilst very jolly, were not what I had in mind for the bed, and so I’ve now moved them out to the raised cutting beds.

A few daffodils are still blooming, this one, the very late N. Sinopel is in the Grass Bed,IMG_7238

these are N. Bellsong, in the greenhouse pots,

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and these N. Lieke.IMG_7221

In the Oak Bed the broom is blooming.  It’s an inherited plant so I’m not sure which one it is, but Cytisus Scoparius Killiney Red looks similar.  There have been years when this flowers at the same time as the Bottlebrush it’s planted next to, but sadly not this year.IMG_7218

In one of the Lavender Beds, this little Cistus is looking happier than it has for a while – perhaps because of the hot dry April.IMG_7232

For scent I have to mention my stock flowers, Matthiola Incana.  I think this is my favourite garden scent of all, shame you can’t scratch and sniff!IMG_7233

And to finish, not yet a bloom, but oh what a pregnant bud!IMG_7234

With thanks to Carol at May Dreams Gardens  for hosting everyone’s GBBD.

End of month view – April 2015

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This has been such a glorious April and I have so enjoyed all my bulbs in the spring sunshine. Above, in the Grass Bed, are Tulip ‘Spring Green’ together with two different Narcissi.  I had originally planted ‘Sinopel’, which is supposed to have a rather green eye, but I’d noticed last year they weren’t repeating well, so I topped them up with ‘Lieke’ which look quite similar. Here they are close up in the copper pot by the steps:IMG_7003

The tulips in the Swing Beds have been a revelation.  I have never planted so many tulips directly in the ground, fearing marauders. Last year I planted a lot in pots, with the idea I would move them in and out of gaps in the bed, but it was all too much like hard work and I also wasn’t so keen on the tulips I’d selected anyway.  This year I took my chances, planted them in the ground and (unlike the dratted crocuses) all have been left well alone.  Hurrah!

When I posted my Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day post on the 15th, I included a picture of the tulips below and said I thought they were Tulip ‘Mistress’ as they were my ‘Earlies’.  However, I wasn’t convinced, and so yesterday asked the very helpful and knowledgeable Karen at Peter Nyssen  (where I’d bought the bulbs from), and she set me straight.  These ones are actually the ‘mids’ ‘Pink Impression.’

Although they were glorious, they didn’t last long as sadly the very windy weather mid month blew their large, blowsy blooms to bits.IMG_6977

However, in a fit of mad extravagance, I had planted two further tulips – ‘Mistress’ and ‘Menton.’   And although ‘Mistress’ was supposed to flower in April, and ‘Menton’ in May, they’re actually working better together than I think either would have with the ‘Pink Impressions’ and I’m just loving their sugared almond girliness. IMG_7022

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Furthermore, my new Peter Nyssen contact has assured me that both the ‘Pink Impressions’ and the ‘Mentons’ are reliably perennial (up to 5 years or so) as long as you plant them deeply enough, and dead head and feed with a high potash feed as soon as they’ve finished flowering.

I do hope this is the case as it wasn’t a trivial outlay and it would be great if I only had to replace the ‘Mistresses.’ (I’m sure there’s a joke there somewhere…)

The two new beds and the Shady Bed were shown in Sunday’s Resolve and Realise post but I will add a close up of the Bronze Bed not shown previously, showing the Tulip ‘Prinses Irene’ (bought in pots which I assume is why they’re so short), the Libertia and one of the new buds on the Calendula ‘Sunset Buff’.

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The hostas are just starting to emerge in the (aptly named) Hosta Bed.  You can see the OH has been out with the blue pellets while my back was turned.  Sigh.IMG_7029

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The Drive Bed isn’t looking too exciting at the moment, with few daffodils and some rather leggy Erysimum Ivory Giant, but if you look closely, as a result of more extravagance with Peter Nyssen, there are dozens of Allium buds just waiting for their moment.  If I’m lucky, it will coincide with the Snow Goose rose flowering above.  We’ll see!IMG_7006

And to finish, my rather paltry showing of Fritillaria Meliagris, but I do love them.

I honestly believe there are more than last year, and on that basis I think I’ll continue my quest for lawn domination.  Hey, for less than £25 I can buy another 200 bulbs.  That’s got to make sense. Or is it just me?IMG_7000

With many thanks to Helen at the Patient Gardener for hosting everyone’s End of Month Views.

Resolve and realise – April 2015

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Such beautiful April weather and yet I still find myself gravitating to the greenhouse rather than doing ‘proper’ gardening outside.  What’s that all about?

So let’s see what I was supposed to do this month:

New for April

  • Prune various shrubs that probably should have been pruned already

Sort of tick.  I delegated the pruning of the shrubs in the shady bed to the OH and he hacked through in a style which I’d like to say was reminiscent of Ross Poldark, but I can’t lie to you.  He hacked through.  Enough said.

  • Continue planting seeds, pricking out and potting on

Oh the seeds and the seedlings – I’ve now planted over 75 different seeds this year.  And no, I’m not entirely sure what I’m going to do with them all.

My dear mother, who sadly never had a greenhouse, raised all her seedlings on the kitchen windowsill and called them her ‘babies’.  As a stroppy teenager I was indifferent to the green fingered nurturing going on in front of my eyes, and yet now, of course, I’m the one doing the nurturing, with unimpressed teens of my own.  I’m sure there’s no coincidence that as my children have grown and required (demanded!) less nurturing, I’ve transferred my attentions elsewhere…

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  • Plan cutting garden

No.  As I mentioned last week, I have had the offer of space in J&A’s walled garden to grow cutting flowers and so now I need to plan which plants might survive the shady spot, which will require the sunny spot and which I should grow at home in the very shallow cutting beds I used last year.

  • Provide supports for broad beans and plant out second wave

Tick.  I planted out the last lot and then rigged up a cat’s cradle affair with poles and string.  And forgot to photo it.

  • Start to erect structures for beans and sweet peas

No structure for beans yet but I have used two of our West Dean made willow structures for sweet peas.  The first in the greenhouse and the second, a semicircular affair, which was made by the OH with no particular purpose, turns out to have been made to measure for wrapping around a crab apple:

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Sadly, the two largest willow structures we both made, which were made to fit into two particular pots, look rather ridiculously top heavy and so I think we’ll have to buy new pots to accommodate them, which wasn’t really the idea.

  • Tidy up shady bed and lavender beds

I’ve had a tidy of the shady bed (see top photo).  The white honesty I grew from seed last year is flowering well, together with the Anemone blanda White Splendour I planted as bulbs in the autumn.

  • Continue planting up the two new beds

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It’s a bit difficult to see what’s going on but there has been further planting.  Firstly the new roses mentioned last month have gone in, including Rosa Falstaff Climbing on my ‘obelisk’.  I’ve also planted out some Cirsium riulare ‘Atropurpureum’ I grew from seed last year.  And also, since this photo was taken, I divided up a clump of Astrantia Roma and have put in a couple of clumps of that.

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There are plenty of seedlings to go into the Bronze Bed but apart from a few more Calendula Sunset Buff, I haven’t planted anything else out.

So carried forward

  • Plan cutting garden
  • Erect structures for sweet peas and beans
  • Tidy Lavender Beds

New for May

  • Plant out sweet peas, peas and beans
  • Plant out greenhouse plants
  • Continue with seeds and cuttings
  • Improve watering options (we have a well and two ‘holding’ tanks and many watering cans, but sometimes you just need a hose!)

So not a bad month.  What have you been up to in this glorious weather and what are your plans for the coming month?

End of month view – March 2015

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All of a sudden, spring has sprung.

This morning (Monday) was beautifully sunny and everything was looking so perky and fresh. Above are a few spare wedding flowers which never made the cut for this weekend’s trip to the bright lights, but they seem happy to have stayed at home.

There’s a lot of other interest at this time of year from pots and containers.  The bath by the front steps has finally filled out, and there are still tulips to come. IMG_6444

 

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and in the trough Narcissi Minnow have just started flowering.IMG_6456

The two Swing Beds have daffodils (Narcissus Jenny) and Forget me nots already flowering, but so much else on the verge.IMG_6459

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The Grass Bed has temporarily (?) lost its willow alliums after wind damage over the weekend, but is looking good with just the Stipa tenuissima and the Forget me nots.  They do seem a deeper blue this year – do they fade over time?IMG_6455

The two lavender beds are starting to fill out too, but both still need a proper tidy up.IMG_6449

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The Oak Bed is probably at its best this month, with hellebores, bergenias and more Jenny daffodils.IMG_6445

And here’s another shot of the reprieved Phormium near the front door.IMG_6441

But the real excitement, is the beginning of the two new beds.

We’ve already admired Hamamelis Aphrodite in the Bronze Bed, but she is now definitely past her best.  However, she’s been joined by a few things – some bought in Tulip Prinses Irene, some Calendula ‘Sunset Buff‘ grown from seed and Libertia peregrinans, a gift from my friend Louise at the Old Rectory garden.

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There’s still plenty more to come, largely grown from seed, to try to keep the cost down, but I did confess to splashing out on some new roses here.

The Mid Century Bed has been named after the structure the OH bought for my 50th last year after I’d admired something similar in a magazine and he went and got it made by the local blacksmith!  It’s been waiting well over six months for its final home, and here it is.

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As well as my lovely obelisk (not strictly but not sure what else to call it) the bed now contains lots of transplanted Cerinthe, some bought Digitalis Mertonensis (I grew some from seed but as they’re still only about an inch or so across I can’t see them flowering this year) and some bulbs.

But as you can see, there’s still plenty of space, which couldn’t be more exciting 😀

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With thanks as ever to Helen at The Patient Gardener for hosting our End of Month Views.

The Greenhouse review – March 2015

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This month in the greenhouse there’s a degree of ‘moving on’.  The Calendula ‘Sunset Buff’ (destined for the new Bronze Bed) and first wave of broad beans (Stereo) have been moved out to the cold frame.

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Many of the cuttings taken towards the end of last year like the Diascia  Personata (black square pots in the foreground), and the dark pelargonium (out of shot, but whose mother plant is pictured flowering today in the first picture),  are growing well and have been potted up individually.  Meanwhile, some of the original plantings of sweet peas (in the background) are growing a little too well and need pinching out.IMG_6100

The second wave of sweet peas is developing wellIMG_6103

and a second wave of broad beans and more sweet peas are filling up the right hand end of the greenhouse bed.

The green tray filled with water is what I use to soak my seed trays before sowing.IMG_6104

And, as plants are potted on or moved out, the latest wave of seeds –  tomatoes, aubergines, cucumber, melon and some hardy annuals – are taking their position on the heated propagation mat (and in the rather dilapidated propagator too).

The uncovered seed tray at the back contains the Gentian acaulis I mentioned last month.  So far only three have come up.  The planting instructions suggested a cold spell may be required but I’m not sure how that would affect the ones that have actually germinated (any thoughts?).  But something needs to be done if the Diving Lady has any hope of a Gentian pool!IMG_6105IMG_6101

There aren’t many blooms in the greenhouse at the moment, certainly none actually planned, but I can offer two.  Firstly, the simple daisy flower of the marguerite.  Like the pelargonium, this has ‘offspring’ cuttings now ready to pot on, to fill pots for a summer display, IMG_6109

and secondly Abutilon Orange Marion.  No cuttings this time, but instead I’m mollycoddling some seedlings which self sowed around the plant, were planted up last year and are now individually filling 9cm pots.  Having done that, however, I’m not quite sure what I’m going to do with six more orange Abutilons.  A hedge perhaps?IMG_6108

With thanks as ever to Julie at Peonies and Posies for hosting this Greenhouse meme.

End of month view – June 2014

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Well, what a balmy June.  However, partly as a consequence of this balminess, I feel like the garden has got away from me this month.  There has been too much indulging in garden visiting (there have been others, watch this space…) and just not enough proper graft.  One thing I have spent a significant amount of time doing is watering – especially all my pots.

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Whilst others around the country have had some significant downpours, we’ve had nothing but the odd shower and as a consequence I’m developing arms like Popeye from carrying endless watering cans around.  Whilst we’re lucky enough to have a well (and associated complicated pump and holding tanks) the water pressure isn’t high enough to use a hose, hence the endless cans – and impressive muscles!

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So, having made my excuses, here we go.  The first picture is the grass bed.  I still love the Stipa tenuissima, but the rest of the bed is looking rather a mess.  The hope was that the dark nasturtium (Nasturtium Black Velvet) would pick up on the dark orange of the buds of the fox and cubs, but the latter seem to be going over, and rather than orange I have numerous tiny dandelion type seed heads, which don’t go with anything.

On a more positive note, behind the fox and cubs, but in front of the grasses, I’ve planted a whole row of the Verbascum chaixii album which I grew from seed last year.  These are just starting to flower so hopefully by next month I will have pulled out the spent fox and cubs and have some towering verbascums to admire.

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This is the left hand swing bed, which is looking a bit exhausted.  I haven’t pulled up the foxgloves yet in the hope that they’ll self seed, but the combination of them, the brown Nectoscordum heads and my very poorly Euphorbia wulfenii is not good.  However, hopefully some concerted effort in pulling all the above out, cutting back the geraniums (out of shot at the front of the picture), and giving some space, food, time and water to various annuals I’ve planted out recently (Cosmos Rubenza, Malope, Cleomes) as well as the existing Astrantia, Roses and Penstemons, will pull things back from the brink.

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The ‘Med Beds’ (ie Mediterranean) either side of the greenhouse door are looking rather better.  The Geranium and Potentilla are flowering well, the Eryngium are preparing themselves and I’ve planted out many of the Agapanthus I grew from seed.  I don’t suppose they’ll flower this year, but fingers crossed for next.  I’m also pleased with the Euphorbia mysinites (at the front), which I also grew from seed and must now be about four years old.

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This is the left hand Lavender Bed, the ones described as ‘bonkers’ in last month’s End of month view.   (Both lavender beds are shown in the foreground of the top photo).

Here you can see the old Allium Purple Sensation dead heads in amongst the lavender.  The colour of the lavender is picked up by the Veronicastrum behind, with a yellow flowering Euphorbia for contrast (and the ubiquitous Verbena bonariensis)

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The shady bed is continuing to look lush, despite the hot weather, and the inherited rose is flowering well

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and the hostas were also looking great, right up until the scaffolders came and planted their scaffold and ladder on them.

IMG_3666A new addition this month is my raised cutting beds which were made out of some repurposed greenhouse staging.  I’m a bit concerned as to how shallow they are, but whenever I pull up annuals at the end of the season the roots never go very deep so I hope with food and water they’ll do ok.  I’ve already cut some Amaranthus viridis, Molucella laevis as well as the Marigold, Calendula Sunset Buff, but the vast majority are still to come.

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Meanwhile, in the veg bed, the Diving Lady’s pool runneth over (and is being invaded by courgette leaves), but at least she now has plenty to look at:

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As well as three different sort of courgettes (yes, I know, too many altogether), I’ve planted French Beans (Cobra), Runner Beans (Painted Lady and Polestar), Chard Bright Lights, Cavalo Nero, Mange Tout, Sugar Snap peas and Pumpkin Munchkin.

IMG_3671I’ve finally planted out the greenhouse bed with tomatoes, cucumbers and, for the first time, Cucamelons.

IMG_3670And on the staging, second waves of beans and peas (which need to go out), various seedlings (the ones in the foreground are Abutilons) and cuttings, as well as in the grow bags some (rather diminutive) peppers and aubergines.

IMG_3643The wisteria is kindly providing a second flush, and the Oak Bed, which I always find disappointing, is actually looking rather calm in the heat of June.

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And to finish, the most exciting development.  After some weeks’ persuasion, the OH has finally agreed that we can lose some lawn to make another bed (see hose line below) as long as ‘he doesn’t have to dig it’.  Wish me luck!

With many thanks, as ever, to Helen at the Patient Gardener,  for hosting everyone’s End of Month views.

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