Tag Archives: Aster Frikartii Monch

End of month view – August 2018

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Late again for End of Month View, and some rather dodgy photos to boot!

The roses above – Flower Carpet Pink – are back on stream and providing good colour in a garden otherwise rather lacking in colour now.

The Swing Beds are pretty much flower free apart from the Asters.IMG_4265

We’re enjoying the return of the decking –IMG_4246

and we even managed to save the vine that grew along the front.  That’s now been joined by some fuller looking troughs with Cosmos bipinnatus ‘Antiquity’ and Pelargonium ‘Choun Cho’.IMG_4255

The veg patch is pretty chaotic but we’re still picking plenty of goodies. IMG_4267

The Zinnias in the Grass Bed have filled out and are providing plenty of picking blooms.

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At the western end of the garden, the ‘Pat Austin’ roses and ‘Happy Single Date’ dahlias have been joined by the Arctotis ‘Flame’.   I just love those spiky blooms!

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The dahlias I’d planned to combine with the Asters in front of the greenhouse were similar to the Arctotis but much bigger, with the fabulous name ‘Mel’s Orange Marmalade’ – see photo below from Sarah Raven website.

Buy Dahlia 'Mel's Orange Marmalade' | Sarah Raven

Sadly, I can’t show my own photo as (I’m not sure if I’ve mentioned this before) I was supplied with the wrong ones, and instead they were pink.  However, they haven’t thrived (probably too dry and not rich enough soil) so in future I think I’ll focus on just the Agapanthus and Asters, and forget the Dahlias.IMG_4245

In the greenhouse, as well as plenty of tomatoes and a few cuttings coming along, these small aubergines ‘Slim Jim’ have done really well.IMG_4258

Aside from that, a few pots, and that’s about it! IMG_4264

With thanks to Helen at The Patient Gardener who hosts our End of Month Views

End of month view – August 2017

Well it’s all gone to hell in a hand basket – end of month view four days late – hopeless. And the photos, taken last weekend when I’d nearly run out of light, are hopeless too!  Ah well, as mentioned before, I find these monthly views handy for me, so think I’ll still take you for a spin.

The Mid Century bed above is looking appropriately ‘bruised’ and the ‘gladdies’ continue to make their presence felt whether I like it or not – and I still can’t make up my mind!

The troughs have been a bit of a disaster this year – the Cosmos Antiquity never really got going, so I’ve allowed the enormous self seeded shoo fly plant (Nicandra physaloides) free rein as there’s not much else going on.  The trailing sweet peas ‘Pink Cupid’ really didn’t like the heat of the metal trough – I suppose not surprisingly – and pretty much all curled up and died.  I’d like to try them somewhere else next year, but worry that with any pot I’ve have a similar problem, and yet if not in a pot how do they trail?IMG_3075

The Veg patch is showing off some rather more successful sweet peas than the ‘Pink Cupids’ but these too have suffered from lack of water.  I’ve definitely had far more blooms from the greenhouse ones this year.

As well as the blooms I’ve had the usual broad beans, runner beans and courgettes but had a terrible time germinating french beans and sugar snaps this year and so haven’t had any.

I am growing Sarah Raven’s flower sprouts or ‘Kalettes’ for the first time this year which are a cross between Brussels sprouts and kale and have ‘baby’ kale in the  place where you’d expect the Brussels to be.  I haven’t harvested any yet and at the moment the plants don’t even seem to be showing much sign the kalettes will appear.  I have just checked the SR website and it suggests I should be harvesting from September to November, so hopefully there’s still time…

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The Swing Beds still have a reasonable amount of interest with the VerbenaPenstemons, Salvia and Asters as well as the incredibly long flowering Diascia personata.IMG_3067

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I shared the view over the Grass Bed as last week’s Wordless Wednesday.  It really was a glorious day and the Cosmos ‘Psyche White’ have been great this year.

The Perlagonium ‘Surcouf’ continues to smother both pots, and increasingly the trellis behind, to the extent where I wonder whether at some state I’ll move the Clematis out altogether and concentrate on just getting the Pelagonium to climb.

Poor (Clematis) Princess Di (as it is she) seems to be as unhappy in my pots as she was in later life, but that’s a whole other subject…..IMG_3065

Another couple of really successful pots have been the pair by the greenhouse doors. These were another Sarah Raven suggestion and have been truly spectacular this year – Thunbergia ‘African Sunset’ with Arctotis ‘Flame’.  I’m hoping I’ll be able to overwinter the Arctotis and even make some more by taking cuttings, but I’ll have to start again with the Thunbergia as it is annual.

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In the Greenhouse Beds I’ve had a clear out of the Nasturtiums as I’m hoping to expose some soil so the Poppies will seed.  I’ve also planted out some Aster Frikartii ‘Monch’ (some of which were grown as cuttings, and some bought months ago).  The idea was to increase the number in the Swing Beds, but they’re currently so rammed with plants I was worried the Asters wouldn’t get established, so thought they’d be better where I can keep an eye on them.  Even if I decide to move them later, I’m sure they’ll be happier having finally got their ‘feet’ in the soil.IMG_3062

At the other side of the garden, the Dahlias and Roses are still pumping out blooms in the Bronze Bed. IMG_3056

By the long table there have been a couple of late Wisteria blooms – but these aren’t them. These are Dolichos Lablab ‘Ruby Moon’ which I had growing in the pots by the front door which have self seeded in a pot I’m growing a Clematis in.  The Clematis is taking its time to get going so these have been a lovely surprise.   Goodness knows how they got here!IMG_3059

Into the greenhouse and I’m delighted the Plumbago has bounced back from near drought induced death to be spectacularly floriferous again.

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And to finish, Aubergine ‘Slim Jim’.  He’s a good looking lad, but I haven’t tasted him yet!

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Garden Bloggers Bloom Day – August 2017

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Plenty of blooms for my late GBBD, starting with this lovely Cosmos, C. ‘Psyche White’.  This is flourishing in the Grass Bed together with the newly planted Erigeron sommerneuschnee and

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and the late sown Malope trifida ‘Alba’ which has only just started flowering.IMG_3045

Bringing more colour, plenty of Dahlias – pink (clockwise) ‘Hillcrest Royal’, ‘Roxy’, ‘Burlesque’ and unknown (!)

dark – D. La Recolata

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and orange –  the old favourite D. Happy Single Date

More pink from fabulous Perlagonium ‘Surcouf’ now climbing the trellis

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and a couple of other colour duos in the Swing Bed – Aster frikartii ‘Monch’ in the foreground with Nepeta ‘Six Hills Giant’ behind

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and Salvia x jamensis ‘Stormy Sunrise’ and Diascia personata

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Meanwhile, in the tin bath by the steps, the jolly Gazanias continue to flowers their jolly socks off.

 

In the Bronze Bed the oft featured roses and dahlias have now been joined by Echinacea ‘Summer Cocktail’IMG_3016

and Agastache ‘Apricot Sprite’ grown from seed (from Special Plants) last year.

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And to finish this little Viper’s Bugloss, also grown from seed and still sitting in the seed tray while I try to decide where to plant it.  I think it deserves better!

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I’m joining Carol at May Dreams Gardens to celebrate GBBD, why don’t you see what others have blooming?

End of month view – September 2016

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Not a great deal of colour in the garden now, thank goodness Verbena bonariensis (above) and the Pink Flower Carpet roses (below) can be relied upon!img_1651

Sadly, plants I mentioned in last year’s September post that I wanted to increase, I seem to have fewer of, namely the Aster frikartii ‘Monch’ and Caryopteris x clandonensis ‘Heavenly Blue’.  I never did take cuttings last year, so perhaps I’ll add to the list of cuttings I’m hoping to take next weekend once the daughter’s out of the way!img_1641img_1644

One plant that is finally making a bit of a show is the Nicotiana mutablis at the back of the bed.  This was planted out late but is now providing some height and colour at the back of the bed, but is not quite as widespread as I’d hoped.

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In the Grass Bed the Ammi visnaga ‘Green Mist’ and Cosmos bipinnatus ‘Fizzy White’ have largely run out of steam and instead the Nasturtiums and some self seeded Cerinthe have taken over.img_1645

In the Mid Century bed there are still a few dark blooms, but it’s the Acacia, Acacia baileyana ‘Pupurea’ (centre) that’s really taking off.  I’m slightly concerned as to what to do with this.  In theory this can reach 8m x 6m which really isn’t what I want in this bed.  I’m wondering whether some judicious pruning can keep it more shrub sized?  I do love the almost metallic foliage.img_1646

To the right of this bed you can see a huge inherited clump of Asters, shown closer below.  However in this photo you can also see the numerous weeds seeded in the pebbly path –img_1648

and even more below.  After trying and failing to move some larger Verbena bonariensis plants to the back of the Swing Beds, I deliberately left the small seedlings here with a view to moving them ‘later’ and now they’re as big as the ones I failed to establish.

Hopefully, if I plant them later in the year, the weather will be kinder than the scorching summer and I can weed the paths and plant some height at the back of the Swing Beds with one stone, as it were.img_1649

At the other side of the garden the Dahlia Happy Single Date is still going strong, (although a bit mildewed) but there is little else of interest here now.img_1654

The tray of succulents is still looking good, but they, of course, cope so much better with neglect!img_1655

There are some other good pots – these lovely Pelargonium ‘Surcouf’ (another one on the cuttings list)

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and the Dolichos lablab ‘Ruby Moon’ seed pods are just astonishing.

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Over in the Veg patch things are mostly coming to an end.

The Chard stems are glowing in the sunshine, but the leaves are very tired and tatty.img_1640

And in the Rhubarb/Strawberry bed there’s just one beautiful Agapanthus bloom.  Oh, and after saying I’d move the white ones out of this bed and into the Greenhouse beds, guess who forgot to mark the relevant plants.  Doh!img_1639

In the greenhouse there are still plenty of tomatoes, this one, Marmande, tastes fabulous, particularly cooked.

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I haven’t planted many seeds, but these Erysimum definitely need to go out.img_1635

And to finish, the apple tree.  In the eight years we’ve been here this tree has never produced anything more than conker sized what I thought were crab apples.  And now, suddenly this year, not only are there dozens of fruits, but many are almost proper apple sized.  Shame they don’t taste of much!

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With thanks to Helen at the  Patient Gardener  who hosts everyone’s EOMVs.

Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day – September 2016

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Over a week late with GBBD, but I still wanted to post as a record for me.  (I’m not sure having my daughter home is conducive to blogging!)

Whilst the raised cutting beds have been pretty hopeless this year due to lack of water,  the Zinnia above Z. elegans ‘Luminosa’ is doing well, whilst these Diascia personata, grown from cuttings last year, are going mad.  I mean to move them into the Swing Beds, but life keeps getting in the way.img_1585

In the Swing Beds the Nicotiana mutablis are starting to get going, but were definitely planted out too late to make the impact I was after.img_1597

They’ve been joined by Scabiosa atropurpurea ‘Blue Cockade’, also grown from seed, shown here with Aster frikartii Monch. img_1601

Further blue is provided by the lovely Caryopteris x clandonensis ‘Heavenly Blue’. Apparently this can be propagated by cuttings, so I really should try to make some more as I love it.img_1600

Elsewhere there are still roses going strong – R. Flower Carpet Pink,img_1582

R. Jubilee Celebrationimg_1618

and R. Munstead Wood.img_1614

Joining the rose above in the Mid Century Bed are Antirrhinum majus nanum ‘Black Prince’ (not looking very black to me!)img_1610

Amaranthus caudatusimg_1615

and Dahlia ‘La Recoleta’.img_1613

Whilst the Grass Bed was supposed to be taken over by Ammi visnaga ‘Green Mist’ and this lovely Cosmos, C. bipinnatus ‘Fizzy White’img_1603

instead it’s been rather overwhelmed by self seeded Nasturtiumsimg_1606

and this grass, which I’m sure I originally grew from seed a couple of years ago, but now can’t remember the name of.  Help!img_1608

In the veg bed, this Lathyrus ‘Heathcliff’ must be one of the very last Sweet Peas.img_1592

In the greenhouse, the Plumbago is still flowering wellimg_1588

and has been joined by the Mandevilla Sundaville Pink.  Some of you might remember these rather gaudy plants were bought at Hampton Court Flower Show to go in pots with the wonderful Pelargonium Surcouf, but I couldn’t bear to plant them together as they weren’t quite the same pink.  Consequently, they’ve been left in the greenhouse, repotted twice, and are absolutely thriving.  Shame I’m now not sure I actually like them!img_1587

To finish this cheeky orange Diascia.  I bought this as a plug plant months ago and it’s in a pot by the front door and has been in almost constant flower ever since.  Gotta love a bit of bedding!img_1628

With thanks to Carol at May Dreams Gardens who hosts everyone’s GBBD (on the, er, 15th of the month!)

In the first year they sleep…

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Late in the summer of 2014 I was at my sister’s new house in Hertfordshire and admired an inherited Penstemon flowering profusely in view of her kitchen window.

Conscious of how very pink my garden is, I thought a lilac Penstemon would work well late in the year with my Aster frikartii ‘Monch’ and Caryopteris x cladonensis ‘Heavenly Blue.’  I snaffled a few cuttings, put them in a plastic bag and travelled back over land and sea to the Isle of Wight.  Once there I planted them in gritty compost and later potted up the healthy cuttings into 9cm pots.

In the spring I planted them out in the Swing Beds and waited for them to add a late summer lilac explosion.  It never came.

All in all I consider Penstemons pretty easy and was a little disappointed (not to mention embarrassed) at the no show of (what I now have identified as) my ‘Stapleford Gems.’  And then last weekend I was walking along the pebbly path to the left of the left hand Swing Bed and there, growing completely horizontally, was just one perfect Penstemon flower head, demonstrating exactly the metallic purply blue colour I’d remembered.IMG_9658

And the title?  Coincidentally, talking to a gardening friend on Saturday, I heard a phrase I’d not come across before relating to perennials, which made me feel a little bit better:

“In the first year they sleep, in the second they creep and in the third they LEAP.”

So, maybe two more years until my lilac explosion, but I’m prepared to wait.Photo courtesy of http://www.alamy.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In a vase on Monday – When two worlds collide

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If Cathy, at Rambling in the Garden, who hosts ‘In a vase on Monday’, wasn’t already using the epithet ‘The Golfer’ for her husband, I would definitely have used it for mine.  He joined the local ‘Shanklin and Sandown’ golf club shortly after we moved to the island and this Saturday became their captain.

A week earlier he had (casually) asked if I could produce some flowers for his ‘Captain’s Drive in’ event on Sunday, when he hosted as captain for the first time, and ran a charity competition, to be followed by cream teas at the clubhouse.  Whilst my initial reaction was ‘no’, I looked around the garden and realised there were still hundreds of blooms. What I couldn’t quite picture was how they would work together, and then I realised, they didn’t have to.

There were to be ten tables of ten, so I splashed out on some cute spherical jam jars from Nutleys and set about making two matching arrangements for each table, twenty in all.

It all seemed like quite a good idea, until many hours later on Saturday….

So here they are, Cosmos Purity and Ammi,IMG_9337

Rosa Snow Goose and Zinnia Giant LimeIMG_9338

Helianthus Italian White and hebeIMG_9325

Rosa Jubilee Celebration, Cerinthe and Antirrhinum Orange wonderIMG_9329

Rosa Pink Flower Carpet, Antirrhinum and HoneysuckleIMG_9330

Dahlia Happy Single Date, Scabious Fata Morgana and mintIMG_9341

Zinnia Raspberry Cordial, seedheads of Iris unguicularis and Photinia leavesIMG_9327

Zinnia Giant Wine and Antirrhinum Liberty CrimsonIMG_9332

Cosmos Double Click Cranberries and Dahlia Downham Royal.IMG_9334

and lastly Salvia Horminum ‘Oxford Blue’, Aster frikartii ‘Monch’ and LinumIMG_9335

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And of course what happened?  They’ve already signed me up for New Year’s Eve.

Oh Captain, my Captain, what have you started?IMG_9349

End of month view – September 2015

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Such a glorious day for my EOMV photos – so much more cheery than last month’s post which looked like October in August!

This part of the garden has taken on a rather purple hue with the Verbena bonariensis, Erysimum Bowles Mauve and asters.  In the two photos below, you can also see the lavender heads, but these are now grey rather than their original mauve, and should really have been trimmed back by now.

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In the left hand Swing Bed, as well as the Aster Frikartii Monch, you can see the annual Cosmos Dazzler and a matching bright pink Penstemon.  These Penstemons were already in the garden when we moved here and were transplanted to these beds five years ago when they were newly created. There are quite a number of them and in prior years they’ve provided a strong presence in these beds, whereas conversely, this year, they’ve been notable by their absence.  I’m not sure whether they got knocked back by frost early in the year, whether I cut them back too hard or whether they’ve suffered from competition, but I’ve missed them, and I’m delighted they’re back.IMG_8816

In the right hand bed, as well as the same plants as the left side, there is also a Caryopteris (front left), Caryopteris x clandonensis ‘Heavenly Blue’.  This is a fabulous plant and matches beautifully with the Aster.  I’ve just checked the RHS website and apparently is can be propagated by cuttings, so that’s another one to add to my propagating list – I would definitely like more Asters and Caryopteris in these beds.

One thing I could do with less of, however, are the hardy geraniums in the front.  There used to be a mix of these, Alchemilla mollis and various other shorter perennials, but the geraniums seem to have bullied the rest and at this time of year they’re just green lumps.  It’s not good enough, but what to replace them with?

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In the grass bed, I’ve mentioned previously that I’d planted out spare Zinnia Raspberry Cordials here to replace the Verbascums I’d pulled out.  I don’t think the quite stiff Zinnias really work with the grasses, so I’ll be thinking again for next year.

In the front of this bed are numerous self seeded Nasturtiums, N. Black Velvet, but the blooms seem to be almost completely obscured by the leaves.  What’s the point of that?IMG_8804

The Mid Century bed is still doing pretty well, but certain plants have got rather out of control – certainly the Malope (which should have been staked but never was) and the Centaurea cyanus Black Boy which I think could also do with some support, but here the salvias are looking great, the Jubilee Celebration rose is blooming again and of course the Rhodochiton atrosanguineus continues its rampage up the obelisk.

The plant in the middle of this photo is an Acacia, Acacia baileyana ‘Pupurea’.  This had beautiful smoky grey, feathery foliage, but I’m concerned it’s got a bit droughted during the summer and hence is showing this rather golden colour.  For a plant that I don’t believe is known for its autumnal tints, this is a bit of a worry, but it seems healthy enough, so hopefully will pull through.

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I still have plenty of tender plants such as pelargoniums and marguerites in smaller pots, but in my large troughs I have rather mad Cosmos.  This is Cosmos Purity which (in common with many of my annuals) could really have done with some staking.  However, I quite like the mad exuberance, and the plants are still going strong, (unlike the double flowered Cosmos in the Cutting Garden down the road).  I think part of the problem is the vine, planted by the OH, which is growing along the back of the troughs and pushing the Cosmos forward.  I have to say I’m not at all convinced about the vine – the grapes are barely edible and it obstructs the view when you’re sitting at the table on the decking, but to date the OH won’t hear of me ‘editing’ it.  Grrr.

As well as the Cosmos, there are some Matthiola Incana plants here, originally grown from seed two or three years ago.  They’re really rather leggy now, but I just love the scent of stocks so I’m rather loathe to pull them out.

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The old tin bath by the front steps has filled out well and has a rather gaudy/cheery (depending on your perspective) array of Gazanias and Chocolate Cosmos, Cosmos atrosanguineus (also featured in this morning’s Wordless Wednesday).  There are also very dark flowered pelargoniums in here, but they seem to have been a little overwhelmed.  And I’m a bit confused about the dark foliage plants at the front – I thought they were the dark leaved Ipomoea, the Potato Vine, but looking at them online, the leaf shape seems to be palmate, whereas mine are heart shaped so I’m not so sure.  Can anyone else think what it might be?

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And lastly, the new Bronze Bed.  Some of you will remember that this was created out of the lawn earlier this year to take advantage of the fact that the area near the house is very sunny, whereas the bed further from the house is shaded by the oak tree over the road.  The picture below hopefully demonstrates this.  Both the oak and the bed on the far side of the lawn are in full shade whereas the new bed is singing in the sunshine.

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It has all gone rather bonkers, with the Dahlia, Happy Single Date, by far the most floriferous of all my dahlias this year, the Hordeum Jubatum seed heads scattering all over the place (and dog) and the Icelandic Poppies still coming.  Happy date?  Happy face!IMG_8828

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With thanks to Helen at the  Patient Gardener  who hosts everyone’s EOMVs.

Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day – September 2015

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So it’s September, which has to be Aster time – see Aster Frikartii Monch above.  This is my definite favourite and I’m hoping next year my recent cuttings will be filling out the Swing Beds and forming a late purple haze together with the similar coloured Verbena bonariensis.

Another genus looking good now is Salvia.  I’m not 100% sure about all these names, but I think I have Salvia Dyson’s Crimson,IMG_8526

Salvia x jamensis ‘Stormy Sunrise’IMG_8515

Salvia microphylla ‘Cerro Potosi’IMG_8510

and Salvia East Friesland

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There are plenty of pelagoniums still going strong, the first two unnamed, IMG_8507IMG_8503

and then P. SurcoufIMG_8504

and this dainty scented pelargonium, P Pink Capitatum.  The flowers are much smaller than the ones above, but I love the markings and the bright green, scented foliage.IMG_8502

And many of the roses are back for a second appearance – Rosa Flower Carpet, with a huge number of budsIMG_8492

Rosa KorizontIMG_8513

This one a gift from my friend Louise at the beautiful Old Rectory Garden – Rosa Jacques Cartier.IMG_8511

This is St Swithun, growing up the front of the swing pergolaIMG_8514

and Rosa Munstead Wood, new this year in the Mid Century bed,IMG_8525

and now joined by the similarly coloured dahlia, D. Downham Royal.IMG_8524

Other dahlias include D. Happy Single Date, in the Bronze Bed,IMG_8538

and D. Fifteen love (bought from Waitrose of all places, and still in its pot while I decide whether I should squeeze it into the Bronze Bed with the one above)IMG_8500

And to finsh, a couple of annuals still looking good – magnificent Molucella

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and still very fresh to look at (although now rather collapsed in habit!) Malope.IMG_8530

With many thanks to Carol at May Dreams Gardens  for hosting everyone’s GBBD.  Why don’t you pop over and have a look at what everyone has has blooming now?