Tag Archives: Anisodontea capensis.

Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day – January 2017

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Amazingly, despite the recent freezing weather, I still have a number of the annual Nicotiana mutablis flowering in the Swing Beds (the one above caught up in the bare branches of the Elaeagnus).

The overall look of the garden is very wintery, but close inspection revealed a number of further blooms, including roses Rosa ‘Flower Carpet Pink’img_2002

and neighbouring Rosa ‘Berkshire.  Note the matching pink stripe on the Phormium – I can’t take credit, both were inherited!img_2003

There are still a couple of Gazanias clearly confused what month it isimg_2009

and likewise this Pelargonium ‘Surcouf.’img_2019

In addition to Erysimum Bowles Mauve I currently have this pair in flower.  The first one E. ‘Red Jep’ was bought last year after I’d admired it so much when I visited Hyde Hall.  The second rather yellow one was grown from seed, and I think is E. Ivory Giant.

By the front steps the Rosmarinus prostratus is covered in blooms, but is hardly looking very ‘prostratus’.

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And whilst I’m chuffed to see Rosemary’s Babies are also flowering, I’m not entirely sure what I’m going to do with them…..img_2012

This Teucrium fruticans plant is really very woody but seems to have responded quite well to a severe hack back last year.img_2036

Similarly this Anisodontea capensis is also past its best, with the stem currently tied to a post to prevent it falling over.  It’s a beautiful shrub when happy in the sun, but mine’s definitely showing its age (I know the feeling).img_2033

There’s nothing in the Veg Patch for the Diving Lady to admire except some rather scruffy kale, so I’m glad she’s still got a pretty pool.

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In the Mid Century bed the Acacia baileyana purpurea looks like it’s going to flower for the first time.  It’s a lovely little tree with gorgeous foliage, but I really don’t think it’s in the right place and will have to go.  But where to move it?img_2032

In the greenhouse there are a few plants flowering – this Abutilon ‘Orange Marion’img_2015

and a couple more Pelargoniums.

I also discovered this beautiful Iris histioides ‘Lady Beatrix Stanley,’ which would definitely be brought into a more prominent positionimg_2017

if only she had some friends!img_2018

Back outside the sun continues to bring out the Freckles

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and I’m waiting with bated breath to see when it will do the same for these:img_2007

With thanks to Carol at May Dream Gardens who hosts everyone’s GBBDs.

Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day – October 2016

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Not many new blooms compared to last month’s GBBD, but I thought I’d share this lovely Abutilon, A. ‘Orange Marion.’

Other Autumn tinted blooms include this Helenium.  I think I’ve previously said it’s ‘Moerheim Beauty’, but I’m starting to think it’s ‘Sahin’s Early Flowerer’ instead.  img_1760

The rest of the garden is still largely pink.  Many Salvias, including ‘Dyson’s Scarlet’, ‘Cerro Potosi’ and ‘Stormy Sunrise.’

Asters are still blooming well, this one, Aster novae-angliae ‘Sptember Ruby’img_1780

and this Aster frikartii ‘Monch’.img_1779

I was delighted to discover during a weekend clear out that I had taken some cuttings last year.  Hurrah!img_1764

Whilst the Pink Flower Carpet roses are still flowering prolifically, img_1751

other roses are more of an individual treat – R. St Swithun,img_1777

R. ‘Jubilee Celebration’img_1791

and this, very precious R. ‘Freeman 1987.’  This isn’t the most robust rose, but very special at it was bought and named for us by our two lovely ‘kids’ in recognition of our silver wedding anniversary in 2012.img_1794

A number of Dahlias are still clinging on, indeed some are returning after a recent drought induced pause, including ‘Hillcrest Royal’img_1792

‘La recoleta’img_1784

And, according to Sarah Raven, these are both ‘Tamburo’, but I feel the second is an imposter!img_1754

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As far as annuals are concerned, sadly the majority have given up the ghost, I think due to drought.  However, this tobacco plant, Nicotiana mutablis is doing a good job of lighting up the back of the Swing Beds.img_1774

I love this shrub, Anisodontea capensis, but it has now got very leggy.  According to the RHS it’s normally grown in a cool greenhouse – thank goodness I hadn’t read that when I planted it!  The RHS also suggests it can be propagated either by seed in spring or semi ripe cuttings in summer.  I think it might be time to make some new babies so that the mother ship can be ‘retired’.img_1790

And to finish, a few Nerine bowdenii.  These were inherited with the house, and always surprise me with their exoticism at such a grey time of the year.

I can’t quite work out whether I want more or not.  What do you think?img_1762

With thanks to Carol at May Dream Gardens who hosts everyone’s GBBDs.

Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day – November 2015

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I took these photos on Saturday as I knew I’d be out all day Sunday, and not only was it pouring with rain but the wind was blowing at around 50mph making it officially a gale.  Consequently some of the photos are rather blurry as, funnily enough, is it was difficult to persuade the blooms stand still.

The number of plants blooming has dropped off dramatically in the last week or so, and the vast majority of my annuals have now flowered themselves to death.  The blooms which are still flowering are overwhelmingly pink, a colour largely inherited when we moved in, but which has been further augmented over time, to the point where this post is rather extraordinarily monochrome.

The Rosa Flower Carpet Pink (top) I’ve mentioned numerous times, but it really is an incredible ‘doer’, (although the buds do get rather battered in the rain).  Here it is joined by the extraordinary Nerine bowdenii – ridiculous flowers for November!

The shrub below, Leptospermum, is planted close to the two blooms above and it too flowers for months.IMG_9515

Another shrub Anisodontea capensis is looking better now than it has all year.  It was planted a few years ago and has definitely taken some time to settle in.  I grew one at a previous property against a south facing wall and to be honest I think it would prefer that kind of protection, but it does get plenty of light and has now grown to the extent that I’m thinking it could do with a spring pruning.IMG_9548

The shrub below offers a more expected bloom at this time of year, Daphne x Pink Fragrance ‘Blapink‘ and has been planted in a pot so that I can move it closer to the house to enjoy the lovely scent.IMG_9526

My last pink shrub is another one having a fabulous late flush.  This is by far my favourite fuschia, F. microphylla.  I love the dainty pink bells which are followed by black berries.IMG_9520

The climber Rhodochiton atrosanguineus still has plenty of blooms, but it has been rather battered by the rain.IMG_9540

Another genus of plants hanging on are my Salvias.  This one, Salvia Dyson’s Scarlet, was new this year and is still absolutely amazing.IMG_9545

Other Salvias still have blooms, but aren’t in the same league.  This one’s Salvia East Friesland

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and Salvia microphylla ‘Cerro Potosi’IMG_9537

And to finish, a rather incongruous shot of the heat and sun loving Zinnias, looking sad and bedraggled in the November rain. IMG_9524

With many thanks to Carol at May Dreams Gardens  for hosting everyone’s GBBD.  Why don’t you pop over and have a look at what everyone else has blooming now?

Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day – January 2015

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So, a funny GBBD – I seem to have a mix of ‘expected’ early spring flowers, like the Iris Gordon, above and belowIMG_5756

together with some tender, hot climate flowers that you think would know better.  For example Melianthus major has just decided to have a second flush of flowers right now:

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But to continue with ‘expected’ flowers, I have a only a few hellebores so far –

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Correa backhouseana,IMG_5775

the odd Clematis Freckles, IMG_5788

and my one paltry Witch Hazel, Hamamelis, (could be Arnold’s Promise, but now starting to doubt it after Chloris said it was the last to flower…)IMG_5770

Less expected at this time of year are succulent flowers.  These are in the (unheated) conservatory.  Two SempervivumsIMG_5749

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and an Aeonium.IMG_5751

Meanwhile, outside, Anisodontea capensisIMG_5796

two Grevillea,IMG_5792

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my incredibly long flowering LeptospermumIMG_5757

and my stalwart Fuschia microphylla.IMG_5779a

And in the greenhouse, in case you’re missing the sun, I’ll finish with Abutilon Orange Marion.IMG_5777

With thanks to Carol at May Dreams Gardens who hosts the GBBD.

 

Garden bloggers’ bloom day – September 2014

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Like last month I’ve used GBBD as an excuse to use my macro lens to get up close with my blooms, starting with Anemone ‘Honorine Jobert’ above.  The blooms are so amazingly fresh for so late in the year – verging on the virginal!

With similar shaped flowers I still have multiple varieties of Cosmos flowering:

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Click CranberriesIMG_4759

and RubenzaIMG_4729

A rather more complicated daisy flower is provided by my Zinnia ‘Giant dahlia mixed’,  It’s been a great year for Zinnias – they’ve loved the sun and heat and have been one of the few flowers to have coped with the lack of water.  And they’re just so jolly!IMG_4709

To round up some of the other annuals I’ve grown from seed this year – a couple of Cleomes IMG_4761

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Molucella laevisIMG_4762

Helianthus ‘Claret’IMG_4755

Salvia viridis ‘Blue’ (here with the increasingly invasive ‘Fox and Cubs’, Pilosella aurantiaca)IMG_4739

And a new one this year, Nicotiana ‘Black Knight’.

For some reason I don’t do that well with tobacco plants.  Whilst I’ve been successful with Sylvestris in the past, I always have difficulty with ‘Lime Green’ (which I love for cutting, so I keep trying) and didn’t have success with Mutablis when I tried it last year.  Conversely this one, which I’m really not sure about, seems to be doing ok.  Such is gardening….IMG_4772

Next a couple of shrubs flowering now – Caryopteris x clandonensis ‘Heavenly Blue’, which looks lovely at this time of year with the similar coloured Asters.IMG_4735

and Anisodontea capensis.IMG_4749

And to finish, some rather more exotic blooms.  Firstly my Glory Lily, Gloriosa superba ‘Rothschildiana’.  This lives all year in the (unheated) greenhouse.IMG_4774

Next my Plumbago, which for the first time this summer I’ve brought outside and seems to be thriving, but I’ll obviously have to move it back to the greenhouse fairly soon.

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And lastly, an inherited shrub that’s planted outside, and has survived snow and frosts and yet looks very exotic.  Firstly the buds and then the flowers.  Do you think it’s some sort of Grevillea?  The leaves seem a little big for a Grevillea (they’re about 5cm long and 1.5cm wide).  But whatever it is I love it!IMG_4779

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With thanks as ever to Carol at May Dream Gardens for hosting GBBD.