Tag Archives: Abutilon Orange Marion

Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day – April 2017

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Very late with GBBD but, looking back to March’s End of Month View, spring has suddenly accelerated in the last fortnight and some tulips have come and gone!

There are a few Narcissi still hanging on – Lieke

and Jazz

Even more astonishing are a few Fritallaria meleagris, still flowering in the lawn.

And although some tulips have finished, Tulip Queen of the Night, is still looking mighty fine – what a colour!

And what another colour!  Tulip Jimmy in the Bronze Bed.

Plenty of over wintered Antirrhinums.  I particularly like the first one, A. majus nanum Black Prince, and lovely to see them flowering so early.

Other annuals already flowering Nicotina mutablis – this either self seeded or survived the winter (er, in which case it can’t be an annual!)

and good old Cerinthe major purpurescens.  This one’s a bit mildewed already, but you’ve got to love that astonishing slatey purple flower colour.

Plenty of Pelagoniums too, these two in the greenhouse

but these two outside (and have been all winter).

Also in the greenhouse I’m excited to see this small shrubby plant blooming again.  It hails from Madeira, but I’m not sure of the name.

Abutilon Orange Marion is showing off her crinkled petals

and the Sweet Peas are definitely on their way now.

But to finish a rather bonkers combination which I’m rather chuffed with – not for the fainted hearted:

With thanks to Carol at May Dream Gardens who hosts everyone’s GBBDs.

Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day – January 2017

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Amazingly, despite the recent freezing weather, I still have a number of the annual Nicotiana mutablis flowering in the Swing Beds (the one above caught up in the bare branches of the Elaeagnus).

The overall look of the garden is very wintery, but close inspection revealed a number of further blooms, including roses Rosa ‘Flower Carpet Pink’img_2002

and neighbouring Rosa ‘Berkshire.  Note the matching pink stripe on the Phormium – I can’t take credit, both were inherited!img_2003

There are still a couple of Gazanias clearly confused what month it isimg_2009

and likewise this Pelargonium ‘Surcouf.’img_2019

In addition to Erysimum Bowles Mauve I currently have this pair in flower.  The first one E. ‘Red Jep’ was bought last year after I’d admired it so much when I visited Hyde Hall.  The second rather yellow one was grown from seed, and I think is E. Ivory Giant.

By the front steps the Rosmarinus prostratus is covered in blooms, but is hardly looking very ‘prostratus’.

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And whilst I’m chuffed to see Rosemary’s Babies are also flowering, I’m not entirely sure what I’m going to do with them…..img_2012

This Teucrium fruticans plant is really very woody but seems to have responded quite well to a severe hack back last year.img_2036

Similarly this Anisodontea capensis is also past its best, with the stem currently tied to a post to prevent it falling over.  It’s a beautiful shrub when happy in the sun, but mine’s definitely showing its age (I know the feeling).img_2033

There’s nothing in the Veg Patch for the Diving Lady to admire except some rather scruffy kale, so I’m glad she’s still got a pretty pool.

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In the Mid Century bed the Acacia baileyana purpurea looks like it’s going to flower for the first time.  It’s a lovely little tree with gorgeous foliage, but I really don’t think it’s in the right place and will have to go.  But where to move it?img_2032

In the greenhouse there are a few plants flowering – this Abutilon ‘Orange Marion’img_2015

and a couple more Pelargoniums.

I also discovered this beautiful Iris histioides ‘Lady Beatrix Stanley,’ which would definitely be brought into a more prominent positionimg_2017

if only she had some friends!img_2018

Back outside the sun continues to bring out the Freckles

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and I’m waiting with bated breath to see when it will do the same for these:img_2007

With thanks to Carol at May Dream Gardens who hosts everyone’s GBBDs.

Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day – October 2016

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Not many new blooms compared to last month’s GBBD, but I thought I’d share this lovely Abutilon, A. ‘Orange Marion.’

Other Autumn tinted blooms include this Helenium.  I think I’ve previously said it’s ‘Moerheim Beauty’, but I’m starting to think it’s ‘Sahin’s Early Flowerer’ instead.  img_1760

The rest of the garden is still largely pink.  Many Salvias, including ‘Dyson’s Scarlet’, ‘Cerro Potosi’ and ‘Stormy Sunrise.’

Asters are still blooming well, this one, Aster novae-angliae ‘Sptember Ruby’img_1780

and this Aster frikartii ‘Monch’.img_1779

I was delighted to discover during a weekend clear out that I had taken some cuttings last year.  Hurrah!img_1764

Whilst the Pink Flower Carpet roses are still flowering prolifically, img_1751

other roses are more of an individual treat – R. St Swithun,img_1777

R. ‘Jubilee Celebration’img_1791

and this, very precious R. ‘Freeman 1987.’  This isn’t the most robust rose, but very special at it was bought and named for us by our two lovely ‘kids’ in recognition of our silver wedding anniversary in 2012.img_1794

A number of Dahlias are still clinging on, indeed some are returning after a recent drought induced pause, including ‘Hillcrest Royal’img_1792

‘La recoleta’img_1784

And, according to Sarah Raven, these are both ‘Tamburo’, but I feel the second is an imposter!img_1754

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As far as annuals are concerned, sadly the majority have given up the ghost, I think due to drought.  However, this tobacco plant, Nicotiana mutablis is doing a good job of lighting up the back of the Swing Beds.img_1774

I love this shrub, Anisodontea capensis, but it has now got very leggy.  According to the RHS it’s normally grown in a cool greenhouse – thank goodness I hadn’t read that when I planted it!  The RHS also suggests it can be propagated either by seed in spring or semi ripe cuttings in summer.  I think it might be time to make some new babies so that the mother ship can be ‘retired’.img_1790

And to finish, a few Nerine bowdenii.  These were inherited with the house, and always surprise me with their exoticism at such a grey time of the year.

I can’t quite work out whether I want more or not.  What do you think?img_1762

With thanks to Carol at May Dream Gardens who hosts everyone’s GBBDs.

Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day

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Pretty slim pickings for GBBD today, but I love the optimism of this perky geranium.

I shared my favourite hellebore last Wednesday, but I’m delighted to have more to show.  Like Julie at Peonies and Posies, my hellebores are bulking up, but there’s definitely room for more!

This Cornus Mas featured on another Wordless Wednesday is still flowering well and, growing in a pot by the front steps, it makes a very cheery greeting.IMG_9835

This Abutilon ‘Orange Marion’ is also in a pot outside, which is starting to feel rather risky bearing in mind how the temparature’s dropped.IMG_9845

The Grevillea‘s also outside and still looking good.IMG_9856

Not blooms, but they were once!  These are the lovely, fluffy seed heads of Clematis ‘Freckles’. Perhaps I should try planting some.IMG_9854

Talking of seeds, whilst the Rhodochiton atrosanguineus is still flowering, there are also some stems which have now turned to seed heads.

I am already growing some (bought) Rhodochiton seeds which I planted late last summer,IMG_9866

but if anyone fancies trying this lovely plant themselves please drop me an email at jenhumm116@yahoo.co.uk with your address and I’ll send you some of the seed heads through the post.  I clearly can’t guarantee success but Chloris assures me they’re easy!

With many thanks to Carol at May Dreams Gardens  for hosting everyone’s GBBD.  Why don’t you pop over and have a look at what everyone else has blooming now?

 

 

Dahlia delights at Gilberts

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My lovely chat with one of the Hillier’s staff trying to identify a rogue dahlia mentioned in my Sir Harold Hillier Garden revisited post, led to us leaving Hilliers to visit Gilberts Nursery, just the other side of Romsey.  Gilberts have a ‘dahlia field’ open from August to October, where they grow 400 dahlias which they supply as tubers and cuttings.  It was an amazing sight and a fabulous opportunity to see so many dahlias in one place.

Whilst catalogues and websites do a great job of showing the actual blooms, seeing them growing as plants – how tall, how bushy and how many blooms – was a completely different experience.  It not only made me want to buy dozens of dahlias, but rather tempted me to open a dahlia field on the Isle of Wight!IMG_8347

Here are a random selection of the ones that appealed to me

Barry WilliamsIMG_8355

GI JoeIMG_8376

Hapet VinetteIMG_8395

Crazy LegsIMG_8363

AthalieIMG_8349

Piper’s PinkIMG_8393

CoccineaIMG_8369

Danjo docIMG_8367

Little SallyIMG_8391

Mels Orange MarmaladeIMG_8387

Dark SpiritIMG_8365

Karma NaomiIMG_8379

Karma ChocolateIMG_8381

Black NarcissusIMG_8360

So, whilst I didn’t identify the mystery dahlia (on the right), I did discover the similarly shaped Coccinea (left) as well many others to tempt me.

Thanks Gilberts, it was an education.

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The Greenhouse review – March 2015

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This month in the greenhouse there’s a degree of ‘moving on’.  The Calendula ‘Sunset Buff’ (destined for the new Bronze Bed) and first wave of broad beans (Stereo) have been moved out to the cold frame.

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Many of the cuttings taken towards the end of last year like the Diascia  Personata (black square pots in the foreground), and the dark pelargonium (out of shot, but whose mother plant is pictured flowering today in the first picture),  are growing well and have been potted up individually.  Meanwhile, some of the original plantings of sweet peas (in the background) are growing a little too well and need pinching out.IMG_6100

The second wave of sweet peas is developing wellIMG_6103

and a second wave of broad beans and more sweet peas are filling up the right hand end of the greenhouse bed.

The green tray filled with water is what I use to soak my seed trays before sowing.IMG_6104

And, as plants are potted on or moved out, the latest wave of seeds –  tomatoes, aubergines, cucumber, melon and some hardy annuals – are taking their position on the heated propagation mat (and in the rather dilapidated propagator too).

The uncovered seed tray at the back contains the Gentian acaulis I mentioned last month.  So far only three have come up.  The planting instructions suggested a cold spell may be required but I’m not sure how that would affect the ones that have actually germinated (any thoughts?).  But something needs to be done if the Diving Lady has any hope of a Gentian pool!IMG_6105IMG_6101

There aren’t many blooms in the greenhouse at the moment, certainly none actually planned, but I can offer two.  Firstly, the simple daisy flower of the marguerite.  Like the pelargonium, this has ‘offspring’ cuttings now ready to pot on, to fill pots for a summer display, IMG_6109

and secondly Abutilon Orange Marion.  No cuttings this time, but instead I’m mollycoddling some seedlings which self sowed around the plant, were planted up last year and are now individually filling 9cm pots.  Having done that, however, I’m not quite sure what I’m going to do with six more orange Abutilons.  A hedge perhaps?IMG_6108

With thanks as ever to Julie at Peonies and Posies for hosting this Greenhouse meme.

Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day – January 2015

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So, a funny GBBD – I seem to have a mix of ‘expected’ early spring flowers, like the Iris Gordon, above and belowIMG_5756

together with some tender, hot climate flowers that you think would know better.  For example Melianthus major has just decided to have a second flush of flowers right now:

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But to continue with ‘expected’ flowers, I have a only a few hellebores so far –

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Correa backhouseana,IMG_5775

the odd Clematis Freckles, IMG_5788

and my one paltry Witch Hazel, Hamamelis, (could be Arnold’s Promise, but now starting to doubt it after Chloris said it was the last to flower…)IMG_5770

Less expected at this time of year are succulent flowers.  These are in the (unheated) conservatory.  Two SempervivumsIMG_5749

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and an Aeonium.IMG_5751

Meanwhile, outside, Anisodontea capensisIMG_5796

two Grevillea,IMG_5792

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my incredibly long flowering LeptospermumIMG_5757

and my stalwart Fuschia microphylla.IMG_5779a

And in the greenhouse, in case you’re missing the sun, I’ll finish with Abutilon Orange Marion.IMG_5777

With thanks to Carol at May Dreams Gardens who hosts the GBBD.

 

Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day – November 2014

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So it’s November, and whilst the garden isn’t exactly overwhelmed with blooms, there are still many flowers – and some quite exotic.  Firstly this orange abutilon, Abutilon ‘Orange Marion’. This is still sitting on my barrow and has been flowering non stop since June.  It’s in a large pot so will be brought into the greenhouse once frost is threatened, but in the meantime it’s enjoying the sunshine.

There are still roses flowering – Snow Goose,IMG_5385

and two inherited, nameless varieties:IMG_5352

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Another good genus still going strong is Salvia, Salvia microphylla ‘Cerro Potosí’IMG_5376

unknown and IMG_5372

Salvia ‘viridis blue’, flowering in front of the Stipa tenuissima in the grass bed.IMG_5381

Climbers include Honeysuckle and IMG_5387

Clematis ‘Freckles’.IMG_5380

In the ‘med’ beds, this Potentilla nepalensis ‘Shogran’ is still flowering well.  I just love this particular shade of pink.IMG_5392

On the more exotic side, flowers which you think should perhaps know better than to be flowering in November, there is a Grevillea (is it just me or do the buds remind you of a rather pretty  fist?)IMG_5370

Marguerites, still looking cheerful despite the chill, IMG_5369

Nerine bowdenii,

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Zinnia ‘Giant Dahlia Mixed’, in the cutting troughsIMG_5362

and the lovely diascia I was given by Nick Peirce from White Cottage Daylilies, which I wrote about here.  I really must ask Nick what it’s called.IMG_5378

And still the Verbena bonariensis come!IMG_5388

With thanks as ever to Carol at May Dream Gardens for hosting GBBD.

Garden bloggers’ bloom day – August 2014

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The garden is continuing to struggle with lack of water – particularly after our two week absence – and consequently I’ve decided to get ‘up close and personal’ for today’s GBBD, and have taken my macro lens on safari.

My first stop was a bed I’ve ‘borrowed’ from a neighbour (no, not the cutting garden, featured in last month’s GBBD, another neighbour) where I’ve planted a lot of orangey annuals – Helianthus Claret, Calendula officinalis Neon, Calendula officinalis Indian Prince and Tihonia rotundiflora ‘Torch’.

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Back in my garden, I also have a couple of orange blooms.  Firstly Abutilon Orange Marion which we bought last year at the end of the summer, from a reduced stand at Wisley.  It was overwintered in the (unheated) greenhouse, and did look very sorry for itself, but was cut back hard and this year has done really well in its position in a pot on the barrow.  During the spring it had lots of little seedlings around the main stem and these have all been potted on.  I’m not entirely sure the garden needs six more orange abutilons, but how could I resist?

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And the second is unnamed as it was a gift, but it has small flowers, as you can see, raised above chive like leaves.  I have a number of these in pots after I divided the original, which are destined for the Med Beds, but like so many things, remain unplanted.IMG_4415

Away from orange, I have a number of (also unnamed) salvias flowering now

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as well as plenty of pelargoniums.  The first is dark. like Lord Bute, but doesn’t have the paler edging.  The second is a lovely dainty scented leaf variety and the third is Pelargonium Sidoides.  I love these flowers too, but I’ve found they are getting a little ‘leggy’ by this time of the year.

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And to finish, I love green flowers, and my Bells of Ireland (Molucella laevis) have been best ever this year.  IMG_4394

Unfortunately, I’m not so convinced about my so called Aster chinensis ‘Hulk.’  I don’t remember Lou Ferrigno bursting out of his shirt and turning pink, but perhaps that’s just me.

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With thanks as ever to Carol at May Dream Gardens for hosting GBBD.