Return to the Duver

IMG_1484During Tuesday’s moody mistiness I finally completed the usual dog walk to the Duver for the first time since spraining my ankle on the 12th.

The main change has been an explosion of lime green Alexanders (Smyrnium olusatrum).

According to Sarah Raven in her “Wild Flowers” book it is “supremely edible, with a flavour a bit like celery, parsley or chervil…..the best tasting bit comes from the centre, blanched naturally by the outer layers of leaves”.  Well perhaps I’ll give it a go, the ladybird seems to like it:IMG_1489 (2)As well as the Alexanders, there is a large patch of wild garlic flowering (which I could also eat, I feel a forage coming on!)IMG_1487Further down towards the coast there was a lovely selection of different catkins

IMG_1497and then finally at the coast, well not much to see at all.IMG_1502

 

7 thoughts on “Return to the Duver

  1. Chloris

    What a lovely spot. I didn’t realise that you could eat Alexanders. Talking of eating wild flowers I had my first nettle soup last week, my daughter cooked it for a mother’s day dinner. Have you tried it? I must try cooking ransoms(wild garlic). Do you use them for flavouring or as a veg?

    Reply
    1. jenhumm116 Post author

      Hi Chloris, I’ve only made nettle risotto and it was a bit of a car crash, so haven’t tried soup! We had some ransoms flowers sprinkled (by the husband) over his fish pie last night. They were delicious – slightly wilted by the heat of the pie and just a little oniony, rather than garlicky, I’d say.

      Reply
  2. Lucy Corrander

    Lovely photographs – though you too seem to be having spring in an autumn drizzle/mist.

    There are masses of Alexanders where I live too. And I too have wondered whether to try eating them but have never plucked up the courage. The idea of them tasting like parsley, chervil or celery is perplexing because, to my palate, these three have quite distinct and different flavours.

    Reply
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